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Publication numberUS2140205 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 13, 1938
Filing dateDec 7, 1935
Priority dateDec 11, 1934
Publication numberUS 2140205 A, US 2140205A, US-A-2140205, US2140205 A, US2140205A
InventorsHaage Konrad
Original AssigneeDelmag Deutsche Elmasch & Moto
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Diesel engine
US 2140205 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

K. HAAGE DIESEL ENGINE Dec. 13, 1938.

Filed Dec. 7, 1935 .ln mm for Patented Dec. 13, 1938 DIESEL ENGINE Konrad Henge,- Esslingen-on-the-Neckar, Germany; assignor to "Delmag Deutaohe Elektromaschinen & Motor-en-Bau-Aktiengesellschaft, Esslingemon-the-Neckar, Germany Application December '1, 1935, Serial No. 53,337 In Germany December 11, 1934 Claims.

My invention relates to internal combustion engines and more especially to two stroke cycle engines operating on the Diesel principle, in which combustion of the mixture of fuel and air 5 is brought about by the heat of compression.

My invention has particular reference to two stroke cycle Diesel engines operated with a comparatively long working stroke and it is one of the objects of this invention to provide means whereby the scavenging and the charging of the cylinder with fresh air can be obtained in a particularly simple and efflcient manner. 1

In the Diesel engines hitherto designed the supply of fresh air for scavenging the cylinder after each combustion and for supplying the necessary air for combustion of the fuel has always been effected by means of positively controlled inflow or outflow ports which have either been valves or slots controlled by the piston or otherwise, such valves or slots having been provided in these engines besides the exhaust slots..

According to the present invention I altogether avoid the provision of separately controlled inflow ports by simply utilizing for the supply of fresh air the exhaust ports which are alternately uncovered and closed in a well known manner by the working piston. In this manner the design of an engine of this kind is greatly simplified and the security of working nevertheless increased.

In the drawing ailixed to this specification and forming part thereof an engine embodying my invention is illustrated diagrammatically by way of example.

In the drawing,

Fig. 1 is an axial section of the working cylinder of the engine with the piston, which is partly shown in elevation, in its upper dead centre position;

Fig. 2 is a similar view illustrating the posi-' tion of the cylinder after it has'uncovered the inflow ports for the inflow of fresh air.

Fig. 3 is a cross section on the line A--B in Fig. 2;

Figs. 4 and 5 are similar cross sections of two further modifications of my invention.

Referring to the drawing and first to Figs. 1 to 3, in which the new engine is shown as applied to a power ram, 0. is the piston, the bottom end of which is supported by the pile b to be driven, while the cylinder 0, which forms the ram proper, is the part which carries out the working stroke to thereafter drop down and hitthe pile b or the pile extension e mounted thereon.

d is the piston rod which is fixed in the pile extension e by the bottom end I of the piston rod being conically enlarged and seated in a conical boring of the pile extension e, a threaded ring 9 being screwed into the bottom end of the pile extension e to force the end I of the piston rod into its conical seat.

A cavity h in the pile extension e serving as a fuel reservoir is connected by means of a conduit 1' with a fuel pump it, the piston rod m of which extends into the way of the nose 1!, provided near the bottom end of the cylinder 0. Whenever the piston rod m is depressed by the nose n, fuel is forced by the pump k into the pipe 0, which extends through a lining p in the axial boring q of the piston rod d and through the piston a, so that the fuel forced into the pipe 0 will be conveyed to and injected into the combustion chamber r and the cylinder 0.

Fig. 1 illustrates the positionof the parts at the moment when fuel is injected into the cylinder and ignited by the heat of compression of the -body of air enclosed between the piston a and the bottom of the cylinder.

The pressure of exthrough these ports.

However since, owing to the mass inertia, the cylinder continues its ascending stroke, the exhaust of the combustion gases is followed by a suction action, whereby air is now sucked in through the ports 8. As indicated by the arrows in Figs. 2 and 3, since the ports 8 extend in oblique direction towards the cylinder bottom, the bulk of the fresh air will flow upwardly towards the bottom of the cylinder.

The combustion gases,

which are still left in the cylinder, have collected close to the piston a or are exposed to the sucking action exerted by it.

In this manner a mixture containing a sumcient percentage of fresh air'is obtained in the cylinder above the ports a.

When the cylinder 0, after having executed its full stroke; starts on its return stroke, the exhaust gases above the piston a are expelled for the greater part through the ports s until these ports are closed by the piston. The mixture of gas and air in the chamber above the ports is now compressed, until the cylinder has reached the position shown in Fig. 1, when the mixture of air and fuel is ignited by t sion.

he heat of compres- Instead of four radially arranged ports as shown in Fig. 3 I may also form the cylinder with three ports which may be arranged as shown in Fig.4with their middle axes intersecting at a point located eccentrically to the cylinder axis. In this manner I obtain the formation of eddies in the cylinder which is favorable as far as the scavenging of the cylinder and the refilling with a mixture rich in fresh air is concerned.

If, as shown in Fig. 5, the ports extend substantially in tangential direction into the cavity of the cylinder and if they are given the form of suitably configurated guide channels, it-is possible to obtain a helical upward movement of the air entering the cylinder along the inner wall, while the gases of combustion flow downwardly in the central zone of the cylinder cavity, being thus enabled to follow the piston a. This arrangement has been found to be particularly suitable.

Obviously the present invention is not only applicable to Diesel engines in which, as in the power ram shown by way of example, the cylinder executes the working stroke, but also to engines in which the piston reciprocates as usual relative to the cylinder.

I wish it to be understood that I do not desire to be limited to the exact details of construction shown and described for obvious modifications will occur to a person skilled in the art.

I claim:-

1. A two stroke cycle Diesel engine comprising in combination a cylinder and a piston arranged therein for relative reciprocation, one

- series of ports provided in said cylinder both for the exhaust of the combustion gases and for the inflow of fresh air, said piston being adapted to control said ports and to perform an additional suction stroke at a value corresponding to the amount of fresh air required.

2. A two stroke cycle Diesel engine comprising in combination a cylinder and a piston arranged therein for relative reciprocation, one, series of ports provided in said cylinder both for the exhaust of the combuston gases and for the inflow of fresh air, said piston being adapted to control said ports and to perform an additional suction stroke at a value corresponding to the amount of fresh air required, said ports extending in a direction inclined towards the cylinder bottom.

3. A two stroke cycle Diesel engine comprising in combination a cylinder and a piston arranged therein for relative reciprocation, one series of ports provided in said cylinder both for the exhaust of the combustion gases and for the inflow of fresh air, said piston being adapted to control said ports and to perform an additional suction stroke at a value corresponding to the amount of fresh air required, said ports being radially arranged so as to cause the air currents entering through the same into the cylinder to intersect at pointed angles.

4. A two stroke cycleDiesel engine comprisin in combination a cylinder and a piston arranged therein for relative reciprocation, one series of ports provided in said cylinder both for the exhaust of the combustion gases and for the inflow of fresh air, said piston being adapted to control said ports and to perform an additional suction stroke at a value corresponding to the amount of fresh air required, said ports being arranged so as to cause the air currents entering the cylinder to meet at points within said cylinder which are located eccentrically to the cylinder axis.

5. A two stroke cycle Diesel engine comprising in combination a cylinder and a piston-arranged therein for relative reciprocation, one series of ports provided in said cylinder both for the exhaust of the combustion gases and for the inflow of fresh air, said piston being adapted to control said ports and to perform an additional suction stroke at a value corresponding to the amount of fresh air required, said ports extending substantially in tangential direction to the inner surface of said cylinder KONRAD HAAGE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2691967 *Sep 9, 1949Oct 19, 1954Gonne Bell NoelPile hammer and like percussion machine
US2904701 *Jun 7, 1957Sep 15, 1959Stirling A ColgateElectrical generator and driving engine unitary therewith
US2934049 *Feb 26, 1957Apr 26, 1960Link Belt Speeder CorpDiesel power hammer
US3027883 *Feb 6, 1958Apr 3, 1962Delmag MaschinenfabrikDiesel hammer for pile drivers
US4920928 *Oct 13, 1987May 1, 1990Hammett Robert BMomentum engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/50.00R, 123/65.00E, 173/125, 123/77, 123/65.00W
International ClassificationF02B25/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02B2720/231, F02B25/00
European ClassificationF02B25/00