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Publication numberUS2142816 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 3, 1939
Filing dateJan 23, 1935
Priority dateJan 23, 1935
Publication numberUS 2142816 A, US 2142816A, US-A-2142816, US2142816 A, US2142816A
InventorsWalter Grumbacher
Original AssigneeSpiral Binding Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Binding construction
US 2142816 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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Patented Jan. 3, 1939 NITED s'ra'rss PATENT orrics 1 3.10.81 BINDING cossmcnou Walter WNW York. ll. 1., signer-to corporations! New York Application January 38, 1085, Serial No. 8,181 3 Claims. 281-) This invention relates to an arrangement for binding sheaves or stacks of sheet material and coordinately therewith to a method of associating a spiral binding with such sheaves or stacks.

For purposes of convenience of disclosure and description I have herein illustrated and de-' scribed the arrangement as employing a-spiral wound wire for binding the stacks together. I do this because such a spirally wound wire serves effectively in connection with my invention and as to certain phases forms part of my invention. However, as to other phases, it does not necessarily so serve. Therefore, it will be understood that where I refer to this binding element as a spiral, my invention is not to be so limited, unless specifically called for by the language of the claims.

Binding constructions as at present used have many disadvantages. Among these may be mentioned lack of adjustability so that the stack cannot be opened to the full extent, that is, to the extent of substantially 360 and even where such opening is possible, it is found that binding or sticking of the parts occurs.

Where binding elements of the spiral or the .ring type are used, a further objection is found where the binding elements: are positioned so as to project outside the book, which is objectionable in the eyes of many people because of the appearance of the binding and because of the fact that these projecting elements may cause injury to articles with which they come in contact.

Among the objects of my invention therefore are: the provision of a binding construction which permits adiustability of the stack through substantially 360 with substantial freedom from binding; the provision of a backing having a raised portion through which .the binding elements are threaded for purposes of attachment and whereby the tendency to bind is reduced; the provision of a binding in which the binding elements are concealed when the book or stack is closed, and in which the binding elements are covered so that they cannot damage articles with which the stack comes in contact; the pro- Figure iisaplanviewof one embodimentof my invention in the form of a book;

Figurefls an end elevationofthebookofl 'lgure Figure 3 is a plan view of one of the elements of the binding shown in Figures 1 and 2;

Figures 4 to ll show various steps in the assembly of the book shown in Figures 1 and 2;

Figure 12 is an end view similar to Figure 2, showing a second embodiment Figure 13 is a perspective view showing a further embodiment of my invention:

Figure 14 is a plan view of one element of the assembly of Figure 13 in developed form;

Figure 15 is a perspective view showing another modification of my invention;

Figure 16 is a plan view of still another modifled form; and

Figure 1'7 is a section taken on the lin'e'lI-l'l of Figure 16, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Before proceeding with the detailed description of my invention, it is desirable to point out one of its outstanding features. This consists in the idea of providing a backing for the stack which has an upstanding portion, which is perforated so as to receive binding elements. These perforations are therefore disposed above the plane of the backing. In the forms illustrated the upstanding portion is shown as disposed perpendicularly to the backing, and this relation has many advantages, although it is not strictly necessary, as freedom from binding may be attained with other conformations as long as they involve passing the binding elements through perforations raised above the plane of the backing.

Referring now to the drawings in detail,.I have attempted to show one embodiment of my invention in Figures 1 and 2, wherein a book comprising a stack of sheets 30 is associated with a cover 32 by a spiral binding element 34 passing through perforations 36 in the stack, and also through an element 38, which I shall refer to hereinafter as the connecting element, and which is associated with the cover 32 in any suitable manner, such as, for example, by pasting, where the element :8 is made of paper or paper-like material. For that purpose the element 38 comprises flaps l0 suitable for being pasted or otherwise associated with the cover 32 as clearly appears from Figure 2, and at its middle portion it has a section 42 which in its normal position is intended shown at 39, to accommodate the spiral binding element 94. The construction of this embodiment will be made more clear in connection with the man-- ner of assembly of the connecting element 88 and the stack of sheets. The element 38 isshown in developed form in Figure 3, and by viewing said figure it, will be observed that flaps 48 form the extreme side portions thereof, and that the flaps 48 are bounded by the dotted lines 84, which in the finished article are lines of folding or bending. The middle portion comprises two strips 88, which in the assembled articleare doubled over into. substantial juxtaposition. This doubling over or bending takes place along the median line 48.

While the element 38 has been shown in developed form in Figure 3, it is not to be assumed that it is necessarily manufactured in such flat developed form. On the contrary, I have indicated in successive steps a manner of forming the element 38 and an assembly of the element 88 with the stack 88, which I have found very convenient, and which does not involve blanking the element 88 in the flattened form shown in Figure 3.

Asshown in Figure 4 the starting point of this latter method of forming the element 38 is a plain blank of material which is indicated in Figure 4 by the letter A, and is shown as rectangular, although, as will appear, it is not necessarily so. The material used for the blank A may be of any character having the desired qualities for the purpose.

The first step is shown in Figure 5, and comprises doubling over of the blank A along the median line 48, so that the two halves are superposed. The next step, shown in Figure 6, involves perforation of the blank adjacent the bend 48, as shown at 39. Figure 7 shows the bending over of one free end along a line 48 and into a position at right angles to the perforated back portion so as to form a flap 48, and Figure 8 shows both free ends bent in opposition to each other. With this step the connecting element 38 may be said to have assumed its final form.

It is now possible to assemble the stack 38 and the binding element 88, by positioning them so that their respective perforations are in proper registration to receive the spiral. This may be done in various ways. I have shown in Figures 9 and 10 one manner of doing so which is very convenient. It involves bending the element 88 into its doubled over conformation, as shown in Figure 9, and then superposing it on the stack 38 so that the perforations thereof register with the perforations in the stack 38. The spiral binding element 84 is then inserted simultaneously through the stack and the element 38, as indicated in Figure 10.

Obviously this process may be modified in various ways. For example, the upper fiap 48 may be left extended outward instead of being superposed on the lower flap while the spiral is being inserted.

After the spiral element 34 has been inserted the parts may be brought into the relative position shown in Figure 11, in which the fiaps 48 are in aligned end to end relation, and the portion 42 stands out from the plane of the flaps 48.

It may'have been assumed from the preceding description that the perforations 39 of the element 88 are equal in number to the perforations of the stack. Such is not necessarily so, however. For instance, where a certain standard .will accommodate any one of the spirals.

series of perforations is used for the stack to accommodate a corresponding standard series of spiral binding elements, it is possible, with a suitable selection of standard pitches for the spiral elements to have a single standard pitch for the perforations of the connecting element 88, that To take a simple example, the pitch of the spirals maybe; two ,coils to the inch, three coils to the inch,'and four coils to the inch. 'By perforating the connecting element twelve to the inch, it will accommodate any of the spirals in the series. Obviously the same system of perforating may be-used for the stacks, although it will be understood that for certain purposes, as, for instance, where the strength of the binding is involved, it will-be advisable to have the number of holes in the stack equal to the number of coils in the spiral.

Figure 12 shows a construction in which the assembly consisting of the stack and the connecting element is not permanently associated with the cover but is readily removable therefrom. For this purpose the cover 62 is provided with pockets 18 adapted to receive the end or flap portions 68 of the connecting element 88, whereby the stack 88, which is connected with element 88 by the spiral 84 passing through the perforations, and the cover, are conveniently and securely bound in a readily separable .relation. The element 68 must obviously be sufficiently rigid so that it will perform this retaining function properly. Where it is made of paper, I have found that cementing together the two parts of the upstanding portion 12, adds greatly to the rigidity.

Whereas in Figure 12 the pockets in the cover for receiving the connecting element are longitudinally disposed in relation to the book cover, in Figures 13 and 14 is shown a cover having a pocket 98 transversely disposed along a transverse edge of the cover, and the connecting element 88 has end portions 89 adapted to slip into the pocket 98 and thereby to retain the element 88 in association with the cover. While not shown, it is to be understood that a similar pocket is disposed at the opposite edge of the cover.

Where a single continuous pocket receives both flaps 89, it is necessary to cut away a portion of theconnecting element 88 as shown at 82.

In Figure 13 is shown the development of the element 88. It will be observed that the upstanding perforated portion 94 forms the central portion of the element 88, and that the ends of portion 98 are cut away so as to form projecting flaps 89 adapted to fit into the pocket 98 of the cover.

In Figure 15 the connecting element 88 is shown as having its central upstanding portion 94 extending to the edge of the cover. This necessitates the formation of a slit at 98" in the upper wall of the pocket 98', thereby forming in effect two pockets. The portion 94' of the binding element 88' projects into this slit 96.

In Figures 16 and 17 is shown a construction particularly suitable where metal is used. The connecting element I84 is of substantially the same conformation as that illustrated at 38 in of any suitable type, such as a spring catch.

In assembling the stack with the cover Ill it is therefore only necessary to depress the detent H2 and to slide the connecting element I of the stack into the channel I08, until it passes the detent H2. On releasing the detent III the stack is locked in place in the cover, being retained within the channel by the stop I at one end thereof and the detent H2 at the other end. Obviously, if desired, the stop H4 may also be made releasable.

It will be understood that while the binding elements 34 and 64 have been shown by way of illustration as of the spiral type. that they need not necessarily be of that conformation. Nor is the use of a single binding element rather than a plurality of binding elements precluded. For example, a plurality of spiral elements might be used, each extending inward from the respective ends of the stack, and meeting in the middle thereof. Or again, a still greater number of separate binding elements might be used.

Where, on the other hand, it is desired to use one or more continuous binding elements, these need not necessarily be of the spiral type. As an instance of such elements I may mention elements having a conformation attainable by threading a spiral element through the perforations and then deforming the coils of the spiral out of their spiral conformation without destroying the desirable freedom of motion of the stack along said coils, although limiting it. In particular the coils may be deformed so as to have a portion thereof extend longitudinally of the axis of the binding element and so as to result in a conformation for the latter in which a series of closed rings each having its plane disposed transversely to the original spiral axis, are connected in pairs by longitudinally disposed bars, all of these bars being arranged in end toend relation. Such a binding element permits an opening of the stack through 360.

While I have referred to the element 36 in the embodiment of Figure 1 and to the corresponding element in the other embodiments as a connecting element" because it has been illustrated in the various embodiments as made separate and apart from both the cover member and the spiral and as connecting the two, it will be understood that it can be made integral with and as part of the cover member in which event it will not be a connecting element in the sense of a separate element. So also, while I have shown this element 38 in the embodiment of Figure 1, and the corresponding element in the other embodiments, as doubled over, it will be understood that my invention is not to be so restricted unless called for specifically by the language of the claims.

Having thus described my invention and illus-- trated its use, what I claim as new and desir to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A book, comprising the combination with a plurality of superimposed sheets having loopengaging portions along corresponding-margins and a binding device therefor having a plurality of attaching loops in engagement with said sheets, of a cover element comprising a sheet of material having parallel rows of openings spaced in accordance with the spacing of said loops, said cover element being held in engaging relation with the sheet-binding device by having a portion between two rows of openings disposed within the loops and portions without said rows disposed without said loops. the loops being passed in and out through said openings, of which device, the portion of the cover element adjacent and between said openings being folded along a zone midway between the rows and secured together outside of but closely adjacent and parallel with the attaching loops.

2. A book comprising a stack of sheets having loop engaging portions along one edge thereof, a cover member having an intermediate fold therein dividing it into two parts, and having the portions thereof adjacent to said fold secured together in doubled over relation, perforations formed in said doubled over portions. and a binding element comprising loops passing through said perforations and through said loop engaging portions of the sheets.

3. A book, comprising the combination with a plurality of superimposed sheets having loop engaging portions along corresponding margins and a binding device therefor having a plurality of attaching loops in engagement with said sheets, of a cover element comprising a sheet of material having parallel rows of openings spaced in accordance with the spacing of said loops, said cover element being held in engaging relation with the sheet binding device by having a portion between two rows of openings disposed within the loops and portions without said rows disposed without said loops, the loops being passed in and out through said openings, of which the cover element has but two rows of openings. I

to provide for its engagement with the binding device, the portion of the cover element adjacent and between said openings being folded along a zone midway between the rows and secured together inside of but closely adjacent and parallel with the attaching loops.

WALTER GRUMBACBER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2894767 *Sep 13, 1957Jul 14, 1959Friedman Harry JPad books
US5445467 *Nov 4, 1993Aug 29, 1995Sisam SaBinding file
US6702330Jun 18, 2002Mar 9, 2004Robert John RocaBook with hidden spine
US7726695 *Oct 26, 2004Jun 1, 2010Meadwestvaco CorporationWire concealing cover for wirebound books
US20050052016 *Sep 8, 2004Mar 10, 2005Guido PelemanBinding element
US20060087111 *Oct 26, 2004Apr 27, 2006Howes Abby JWire concealing cover for wirebound books
Classifications
U.S. Classification281/29, 281/19.1
International ClassificationB42B5/12, B42B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationB42B5/12
European ClassificationB42B5/12