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Publication numberUS2143182 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 10, 1939
Filing dateMay 5, 1934
Priority dateMay 5, 1934
Publication numberUS 2143182 A, US 2143182A, US-A-2143182, US2143182 A, US2143182A
InventorsLester Barr John
Original AssigneeLester Barr John
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Accessory for steering
US 2143182 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

.1. L. BARR 2,343,182

y ACCESSORY ma STEEMNG Jan. w, 1939.

@riginal Filed May 5, 1934 2 Sheets-Sheet l Jam., w, w39. J1 L. BARR MMSE ACCESSORY 1 FOR STEERING Original Filed May 5, 1934 2 Sheets-Shee 2 Patented Jan. 10, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Application May 5, 1934, serial No. 724,168

Renewed October 13, 1936 19 Claims.

My invention relates to mechanisms which iacilitate the steering of vehicles in circumstances such as parking and unparking vehicles in confined spaces.

It is particularly adapted to facilitate steering of automotive vehicles.

It is an object of the invention to provide a pressure operated lift element capable of elongation while at the same time permitting the element to be moved into a position out of the way of the operating mechanism of the car and without materially affecting the road clearance thereof.

A further object of the invention is to provide 'a mechanism of the type described which tends to center itself transversely and longitudinally.

Another object of the invention is toprovide a lift lement capable of elongation which is so constructed as to give a substantially uniform lift per unit of elongation regardless of the transverse displacement of its ground engaging portion.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a lift element which may move forward or backwards, or sidewise in either direction, without injury to the mechanism, in response to movement of the vehicle while the device is in use.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a lift element which will, when it is in use, compensate for any movement of the vehicle without injury to the device or to the vehicle, and which will, by reason of said compensating provisions, operate smoothly.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a cam device which, in cooperating with the elongating portion of the lift element, will compensate for lateral displacement of the foot and lift element with respect to a fixed spot on the Vehicle.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a liitelement which is constructed so that it inherently retains its characteristics of uniform lift even though the vehicle has been moved transversely during the lifting operation..

I With these and other objects in View, which may be incident to my improvements, the invention consists in Ithe parts and combinations to be hereinafter set forth and claimed, with the understanding that the several necessary elements comprising my invention may be varied in construction, proportions and arrangement. without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

1n order to make my invention more clearly understood, I have shown in the, accompanying drawings means for carrying the same into practical effect without limiting the improvements in their useful applications to the particular constructions, which, for the purpose of explanation, have been made the subject of illustration.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a view in side elevation partly diagrammatic, showing my lift device in ground engaging position attached to the front axle of the automobile.

Fig. 2 is a detailed front elevation of my device showing in dash lines transverse displacement of the lift element and the operation of the device for compensating for such movement, and also in dot dash lines the device raised into the inoperative position.

Fig. 3 is a View taken along line 3-3 of Fig. 2, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Fig. 4 is a view taken along line 4--4 of Fig. 2, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Fig. 5 is a detailed sectional View taken through a longitudinal axis of the fluid pump.

Fig. 6 is a view of a modied form of the device, such View being a view in front elevation.

Fig. '7 is a sectional view taken along the longitudinal axis of the piston of a modied form shown in Fig. 6.

Referring to the drawings, Fig. 1 shows a side frame I on which is himg a front spring element 2 by means of a front spring shackle 3 and a rear spring shackle 4. The spring 2 is attached to the axle 5 by means of U-bolts 6. The axle 5 has attached to its front side a support I which comprises a U-shaped member having a base 8, a side piece 9 and a front I I. by means of U-bolts I2 tothe axle 5. The front I I of the support 1 is in eieot a cam plate and is provided with a cam surface I3.

I have shown a cylinder head I4 provided with an aperture I5 in its upper end. The cylinder head I4 is tightly fitted around a cylinder I6. The cylinder head is provided with slots I'l in which fit pivot members I8 and I9. The pivot member I9 is inserted in aperture 2l formed in the base 8 of the support 1. The pivot member i9 is provided with a reduced portionv 22 which actually ts in one of the slots il. The other slot Il ts over a reduced portion 23 of the pivot I8 which is inserted in portion II of member l and which is provided with a nut 24, a spring holding section 25 and an outer annular disc 2S. The construction permits pivoting of the cylinder I6 and the cylinder head I4 on the pivots I8 and IS and also permits the cylinder head and cylin- The support 8 is attached der to slide up and down by reason of the slots I1.

In the cylinder is mounted a piston 27 which has a key way 28 which engages with a key 29 carried by a cylinder head 3I. The cylinder head 3l ts tightly to the cylinder I6 and is provided with stub shaft extensions 32 and 33. The base plate 8 of the support 'I is provided with cam surface corresponding to the surface I3 of front plate II and also surfaces corresponding to the surfaces 34 and 35 of the front plate II Mounted on stub shaft 32 is a roller 36 which is adapted to bear against these cam surfaces which correspond to the cam surfaces I3, 34 and 35 formed on the front plate Il and which can be easily discerned from an inspection of Fig. 2.

Stub shaft 33 is provided with a roller 38 which is adapted to follow over the cam surfaces I3, 313, and 35 formed on front plate II of support 1. A holding screw 39 holds this roller 38 in position, The roller 33 can be held in position by reason of the conguration of the base 8.

Mounted on the piston 2 isa fluid-tight head assembly of the usual type which I have designated by numeral 4I in the drawings.

In communication with the aperture I5 and the cylinder head Ill is a fluid-tight xture 42 communicating with a ilexible tube 43 through which is adapted to be fed fluid, such as oil, under pressure to the cylinder to operate the piston.

rIhe piston 2l is provided with an arm 45 having a spring catch 45 on its end. There is formed a bifurcated support 46 at the end of the piston 22'. Mounted on the piston 2l is a spring member 6.1i which is attached to the arm 44. Pivoted in the bifurcated support 86 on a pivot 88 is a female member 89 of a compression element 53. The female member is internally screw threaded and is adapted to receive a screw threaded member 5I provided with a ball 52. The ball 52 ts into sockets in a foot piece 53 and is held in place by holding plate 54 which may be fastened by holding screws 55 to the foot piece 53.

A lock nut 55 holds the members 5I and 49 at the proper adjusted length for the compression element. Fastened to a support 57 is a Bowden wire member 58 which passes through a hollow holding nut construction 59 on a support 58 which is held by U-bolts 6I on the axle 5. A spring member 62 is affixed to the support 50 and is adapted to bear against the upper surface of the holding plate 5@ of the foot member 53.

Spring 52, in combination with Bowden wire 58 acts as an anti-rattle. Bowden wire 58 passes through a cover sheath 53 and the wire 58 is attached to a ring 68 which may be mounted en a steering post 65 of the car. The ring 8d can be pulled to pull up on the Bowden wire 53 and to pull the mechanism up into the position shown in dotted lines in Fig. 2, at which time Bowden wire 58 holds the mechanism in the up position at the side of the axle and the spring 62 is exerting pressure on the top of the foot member. A .suitable hook (not shown) can be provided on the steering post onv which the ring 64 can be hooked to hold the device in its up' position as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 2.

Mounted on the frame l is a support 66 to which is pivoted at 58 a link 6l. Link 8l is pivoted at 68 to a hand lever 69. To the hand lever 8E. is pivoted at ll a fastening member l2. Fastening member I2 is attached to piston rod .'13, v

v`nPiston rod 'I3 passes through a packing gland l@ mounted in a head 75. The head 'I5 fits within a cylinder IE which is provided with a breather hole 'Il and a ller screw 'I8 which may be removed to fill the cylinder 'I6 which acts as a reservoir for the operating uid, which may be oil.

The head I5 is screwed as indicated at I9 into another head 8l. The piston 'I3 is adapted to reciprocate in aperture 82 in the head 75. A lock nut 83 holds the ensemble together, the cylinder I@ being held between head 8| and fitting over the head l5, the lock nut 83 exerting tension holding the whole together in operative position.

In head 8E is a relatively large valve aperture 88. From the aperture 84 is a communicating port 85 which leads tothe aperture 82 in the head l5. There is another port 8S that leads into the interior 5l of the cylinder I6. Another port 88 leads into another enlarged valve aperture 88. In thevalve aperture 84 is a ball 9| which is held pressed against the port 86 by means of spring 92. A screw head 93 holds the spring 92 in position.

A spring 98 holds the ball 95 in the aperture 35 against the port 88. An apertured screw plug 58 bears against one end of the spring 54 and has a passageway therein through which iluid may pass to an enlarged aperture 9T formed in the head 8l.

The enlarged aperture 91 communicates with a port 38 that leads into the interior 81 of the cylinder. A conical valve member 99 is adapted to seat in a conical seat provided in the entrance to the port 98. In the top of the head 8l ts a screw threaded member IBI into which is also screwed a nut member E82. Between the two members is packing H33. Both members IUI and E52 are apertured to provide for the passage of a valve stem IM which carries an operating head 55 at its upper end.

On the head 3l is provided a support IDS upon which is pivoted'at I @l an operating lever I 08 which is operated by an operating rod |89. The operating rod ISS is adapted to be moved downwardly to pivot lever |98 to raise the head |05 and hence the rod IM, and release the conical valve 99 from its seat, as will be later described.

In operation the lever 69 is operated by hand by the operator to reciprocate the piston 13. Oil is drawn on the back stroke, i. e., to the left with the parts in the position shown in Fig. 5, through port 35 raising the ball SI. The oil then passes through port 85 into the aperture 82 in front of the piston 73. When the piston 'I3 moves to the right, the oil in front of the piston is forcibly ejected through ports 85 and 88, raising the ball and delivering the oil into valve aperture Sl whence it passes through connection I l2 into pipe I I I, thence into the flexible tubing s3 from whence it is delivered into the aperture in the cylinder I 6 lying above the piston head l. This oil forces the piston 2l downwardly.

Previously, the ring 68 had been manipulated to operate the Bowden wire 58 to permit the device to occupy its down position. The vehicle, on operation of the pump, as described, will be slightly raised to relieve the weight at least in part on at least one of the steering wheels, permitting them to be turned readily.

In turning the steering wheels, which may be partially contacting the roadway, and operating the mechanism, the device may at times tend to assume the positions indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 2, which occur at the bottom of that gure.

The device may more completely assume these positions if during the use thereof, with the steering wheels cramped, the vehicle is permitted 'to' move even slightly by releasing the brake of the vehicle.

the floor board II5 of the car.

The foot brake will preferably be used for convenience of operation to hold the vehicle stationary while the device is being used to relieve Weight on the steering wheels, and it is readily apparent that the drivers foot may very easily slip or otherwise ease up' on the pressure maintained on the foot brake, thus permitting the Vehicle to move some, especially when he is using the device on hills.

It is apparent that this device, by having a universal movement, will never be subjected to any strains and the dangerl of breaking that would occur and exist if it had a possible swinging motion in only one direction, be that direction either longitudinal or lateral. This is due to the fact that in turning the steering wheels while they are contacting the roadway, even though the vehicle is at rest, there isaI virtually lateral. movement imparted to that end of the vehicle to which they are attached, Which, in the conventional motor vehicle, is the front axle. This movement is due to the manner in which the steering wheels are mounted on the conventional motor vehicle.

Because of the contact of the rollers 36 and 38y with the cam surfacesl I3, the effective lift per unit of movement of the piston 21 will be approximately the same within certain defined limits.

In operation, the rollers pass over the cam surfaces I3, and thev upper slotted portions I1 of the cylinder head I4 `slide on the pivots i8 and I9. Y

It is to be noted that the spring 41 tends to prevent longitudinal displacement of the cornpression element. There isy a spring H3 which exerts a tension between pivot 25 and spring attachment member 45. This spring II3 tends to center the device from lateral or transverse movement. Since the forces exerted by the rollers on the cam surfaces I3 under tension of this spring tend to bring the device into the position shown in solid lines at the bottom of Fig. 2. This spring II3 also performs the function of holding the piston 21 up in the cylinder I6 when the device is not actually being used in lifting, and so in driving the vehicle after one lifting operation of several that are normally required when parking, the compression element is automatically raised from contact with the roadway,

as it is so adjusted that when not under presu sure from the piston 13, the foot 53 rides a little ways above the roadway in the lowered position.

When it is desired to release the device, the operator presses upon a pedal II 4 mounted on This pedal Il@ is provided with a bell crank lever IE6 which is pivoted at II'I. 'Ihe bell crank lever pushes downwardly on the rod IDS and raises the valve 99 from its seat in the port 98, thus permitting `the uid under pressure in the cylinder I6 to pass through the port 98` back into the interior 81 of the cylinder 16. This use of the pedal I It is all that is necessary after each use of the pump. As the device is left in the vertical position during the entire parking maneuvering operation, spring I I3 holds it out of Contact with the roadway as the vehicle is moved.

It is contemplated that this device may be mounted on the front axle at a point midway between the two steering wheels, or that it may be mounted off to one side ofthe middle point. The side mounting would be the only one. adaptable for use on vehicles that have no front axle, the mounting being at some convenient place on the structure, provided in such vehicles, on which provision is made by the manufacturer for jacking up a front wheel. The difference between the central and side positions of mounting is that in the central position, certain movements ofthe compression element occur which are absent when the mounting is at the side. The reason for this difference is that when the central mounting is used, it is contemplated that there will not be enough lifting length provided in the piston 21 to raise the wheels of the vehicle completely off the roadway, but only enough to relieve the wheels of a sufficient amount of theV weight of the vehicle to allow them to be turned readily, 'leaving the wheels in contact with the roadway.

In the use of the side mounting, where only one wheel is relieved by the lifting device, provision may be made for either partially taking the weight olf that wheel, leaving it in Contact with the roadway, or there may be provided sufcient lifting length in piston 21 to raise the Wheel itself free of the road. In turning the steering wheels, when the mechanism for relieving weight on the wheels is in use, the device may at times tend to assume the positions indi,- cated by the dotted lines in Fig. 2, which occur at the bottom of that gure.

This is due to the fact that in turning the steering wheels while they are contacting. the roadway, even though there is no forward or backward motion of the vehicle, there isa virtual- `ly lateral movement imparted toy that end of the vehicle to which they are attached, which in the conventional motor vehicle is the front end. The reason for this is that the front or steering wheels are mounted on the vehiclein such a manner as to provide for easy steering of the vehicle and long life for the tires, and the same mounting that accomplishes these objects causes the front end of the vehicle to move sidewise when the steering wheels, provided they are contacting the roadway, are turned while the vehicle is at rest.

In the conventional motor vehicle the two steering wheels' are mounted on spindles which are mounted on the vehicle, usually one on each end of the iront axle, by means of king pins through spindle yokes. In some of the later models of motor cars, the iront axle as such, is done away with and there is provided a different construction for the front wheel mounting, but they too have the spindle for each wheel and the king pin for attaching the spindle to the vehicle. It is in the method of mounting the spindle, the king pin. and the spindle arm, that provision is made for easy steering and long tire wear.

Caster, camber, king pin inclination, toe-in, and turning radius are the names given to the different phases of steering wheel mounting, and they are ali present in the conventional motor car, as each plays its part, and has its function to perform.

Caster is the name given to the rearward leaning of the king pin to produce a trailing effect to the front wheels. The king pin is tilted backwards at the top by the method of mounting the axle to the iront longitudinal car springs, and as` it is a straight pin, that means that the bottom end of it is pointing forward of the point on the roadway where the center of the tire is` resting. Just as in the case of any kind of caster, there results the eifort of the wheels to run in a straight ahead position, due to their trailing position.

When the vehicle turns a corner, caster has the effect of tending to cause the wheels to come back to the straight ahead position. This is because the king pin, being tilted backward, and the wheel turning on the king pin, there is a lift given to the axle at the point where the inside wheel is mounted and a drop or lowering given tothe axle at the point where the outside wheel is mounted. After the driver releases the wheels from the turning force which he has applied they will tend to straighten out.

Lest it be confusing how this up and down motion is given to the two ends of the axle, perhaps it is Well to cite the fact that the inside Wheel, on the turn, really moves backwards, that is, in relation to its point of mounting where the spindle yoke is fastened in by the king pin, and the outside wheel moves forward. Of course, the result is that the king pins being tilted backward, the two wheels move oppositely in relation to the tilt of the king pins. The inside wheel on the turn will cause the portion of the Vehicle to which it is attached, usually the axle, to rise, because as the wheel turns backward, the spindle, due to the backward tilt of the king pin, tries to come closer to the ground. Of course, this is impossible as the wheel is around the spindle and will not permit the spindle to get closer to the ground than the radius of the wheel. However, when the spindle comes into the position caused by turning the wheel backwards, something must compensate for this dropping eiect, and what happens is that the axle, to which the spindle is attached, rises.

So also, on the other end, the wheel that turns moves forward in relation to the king pin, and due to the backward tilt of the king pin, the spindle, as it swings around, rises. Of course, the wheel cannot rise with the spindle as it must stay on the ground and carry the weight of the vehicle, so what happens is that the axle is drawn closer to the ground at this point. The wheel cannot get closer or farther from the ground as its position on the ground is always the same, but that is not true of the spindle, the angle of which, up and down from the end of the axle, changes, and the axle, or other part of the vehicle to which it is attached, moves up and down in response to these changes.

Now it is apparent that even though the Vehicle be at rest, there will be a sidewise motion imparted to the front end of the vehicle if the steering wheels are turned, be-cause of the rearward tilt of the topparts of the two king pins. As the two wheels turn, even though the vehicle is not moving either forward or backward, the front end of the vehicle shifts sidewise opposite to the direction in which the wheels are turned, being impelled in that direction by the same forces which cause the axle at the inside wheel to rise and at the outside wheel to drop, as described above.

Camber the name given to the angle that the steering wheels are inclined outward at the top. This is accomplished by the angle at which the spindle is mounted to the end of the axle, there being a sloping of the spindle, making the outer end of the spindle come closer to the ground than the inner end. The purpose of this camber is to cause the point of road Contact of the tire to come under the center of the king pin.

The king pin is mounted in such a way that the top of the king pin is inclined in toward the longitudinal axis of the vehicle, and the bottom projects outward along the line of the front axle. This is necessary in the present day motor cars with their small wheels and big tires, if the camber given to the wheels is to be practicable. Without it, there would have to be such a great amount of camber in order to place the road contact portion of the tires under a king pin mounted perpendicularly, that the wheels would have so great an inclination outward at the top that steering of the Vehicle on turns would be diincult, side strain on the wheels themselves would be severe, and there would even be danger of forcing a tire off the rim of the wheel. Moe tions due to camber are cared for by this device.

Camber adjustment without toe-in provision would cause the tires to wear on the shoulders. Toe-in is the phrase used to describe the inward inclination of the front portions of the wheels and it is obtained by mounting the spindles so that their outside, or free ends, are a little forward of the axle. This takes the weight off the shoulders and puts it upon the center of the tires, and also produces a marked steadying eifect upon the steering of the vehicle. Toe-in may cause certain motions that must be absorbed by my device, and its construction permits such motions to be absorbed during operation.

There is provision made in the steering assemf bly of a motor Vehicle to take care of the different sized arcs on which the two front wheeis travel when the vehicle makes a turn. This is called the turning radius, and it is obtained by setting the spindle arms, which turn the spindles through the spindle yoke around the king pin, obliquely from the steering knuckle. In this way, the wheels must spread apart at the front as they are turned, thus causing the outside wheel to run in a large arc and the inside wheel in a small arc. This construction also imposes certain motions on the front of the vehicle when cramping the wheels.

All of the above indicates the complex factors which affect this device in operation. The various features of construction which it embodies enable it to function smoothly and efficiently and to care for the variables which occur in its use.

n Figs. 6 and I have shown an alternate form of the device which comprises a support 263 which is attached by means of U-bolts 25 to the front axle 5. The support 209 is in eifect a cylinder head and is provided with an aperture ?@2 which communicates with the exible tubing 53. Screwed into the support 29) is a cylinder 203. Adapted to slide in the cylinder 253 is a piston 2M having the usual piston head M5 which I have indicated generally. Another cylinder head 295 is screwed over the cylinder 203. The piston 204 is provided with a bifurcated end 2B? which carries a pivot 258 on which is pivoted a support piece 289.

The support piece 209 has a pivot 2H which passes through bifurcated construction 2 i 2. The two pivots 2i l and 268 comprise a universal joint. The compression element is attached to bifurcated structure 212 and comprises two compression struts 2i3 set at an angle with a bracing member 2 l l between them. To the bracing member 2l@ is attached Bowden wire 58. Each of the compression struts ZIB carries a ball 2! 5, which ts within foot pieces 216.

l a spring support 2H.

There is provided on the support member On the `piston 204 is another spring support ZIB. The spring 21,9 Vhas its ends supported at 2H and ZIB. Spring 2| 9 tends to compress the device into its collapsed or upper position. The tension of the spring 2I9 of course acts in addition to the weight of the vehicle which latter quickly forces piston 264 towards its upper position until the feet Zl are ready to leave the roadway, when spring ZIS completes the upward movement of cylinder 204.

In the collapsed condition of the device, it may be raised to the horizontal position on pivot 2i! as indicated in Fig. 7 in dotted lines. In operation, when feet 216 are on the ground, there may be transverse or lateral displacement of compression struts 2l3 atany time during the operation, but such lateral or transverse displacement will not greatly change the amount of lift which will be obtained per unit of relative movement between the cylinder 203 and the piston M. "I his is apparent from an inspection of Fig. 6. The plurality of compression struts in combination with the feet members cause the members to give substantially uniform lift per unit of elongation (see dotted lines, Fig. 6, which show that this phenomenon occurs). In this form of .device there will be greater lift at points between the two positions shown of the lower or longitudinally swung Vcompression elements ZIE and 213, but this greater lift will not be harmful in operation of the device.

This device will center itself vertically after each lifting operation, as spring 2id raises piston 2&4 so that foot .pieces 2id are clear of the ground, and the struts `2I3 will swing freely .on pivots 268 and 2H to a vertical position.

While I have shown and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, I wish it to be understood that I do not confine myself to the precise details of construction `herein set forth, by way of illustration, as it is apparent that many changes and variations may be made therein, by those skilled in the art, Without departing from the spirit of the invention, or eX- ceeding the scope of the appended claims.

Even when only one of the steering Wheels is in contact with the ground, the various motions described herein at least in part occur.

I claim:-

1. In a steering accessory, a lift element, a foot therefor, means to elongate the lift element, and means adapted to give substantially uniform lift regardless of lateral displacement of the foot element.

2. In a steering accessory, a lift element, a foot member therefor, means to elongate the lift element, means adapted to give a substantially uniform lift regardless of lateral displacement of the foot element, and means permitting the lift element to be held out of operative position with its longitudinal axis substantially at right angles to that of the vehicle 3. In a steering accessory, a lift element, a foot member therefor, means to elongate the lift ele-- ment and cam means cooperating with the lift element to give a substantially uniform lift regardless of the lateral displacement of the foot element.

4. In a steering accessory a lift element, means supporting the lift element for universal movement on the vehicle, a foot member therefor, means to elongate the lift element and means to give a substantially uniform lift regardless of lateral displacement of the foot element.

5. In a steering accessory, a lift element, means supporting the lift .element for universal movement on the vehicle, means resisting transverse displacement of the lift element, a foot member for the lift element, means to elongate the eleyment and means `adapted to give a substantially uniform lift regardless of lateral displacement of the foot element.

6. In `a steering accessory, a universally pivoted lift element, a foot member therefor, means to` .8. In a steering accessory, a lift element, av

foot member therefor, 4a piston formed thereon, a cylinder in which the piston can reciprocate, a source of fluid `,under .pressure adapted to operate the piston to elongate the ,element and means adapted to lgive substantially uniform lift for aV given piston movement, regardless of the lateral displacement Yof the foot member Within predetermined limits, anda release mechanism permitting the return of the piston to its initial position.

9. In a steering accessory, a lift element, a foot v.member therefor, a piston formed thereon, a cylinder in which the piston can reciprocate, a source of fluid under pressure adapted to operate the piston to elongate the element, means permitting the element to be held out of operative position with its longitudinal axis substantially at right angles to that of the vehicle and means adapted to `give substantially uniform lift for a given piston movement regardless of lateral displacement of the foot member within determined limits.

10. In a steering accessory, a lift element, a foot member therefor, a piston formed thereon, a cylinder in which the piston can reciprocate, a source of fluid under pressure adapted to operate the piston to elongate the element, cam means cooperating with the element to give substantially uniform lift regardless of lateral displacement of the foo-t element.

11. In a steering accessory, a lift element, means supporting the lift element for universal movement on the vehicle, a foot member for the element, a piston formed on the element, a cylinder in which the piston can reciprocate, a source of fluid under pressure adapted to operate the piston, and means adapted to give substantially uniform lift regardless of the lateral displacement of the foot member within determined limits.

12. In a steering accessory, a lift element, means supporting the element for universal movement onthe vehicle, means tending to prevent transverse displacement thereof, a foot member therefor, a piston formed on the element, a cylinder in which the piston can reciprocate, and a source of fluid under pressure adapted to operate the piston to elongate the element.

13, In a steering accessory, a lift element,

means supporting the element for universal movement on the vehicle, means tending to prevent transverse displacement thereof, a foot member therefor, a piston formed on the element, a cylinder in which the piston can reciprocate, and a source of uid under pressure adapted to operate the piston to elongate the element, and means adapted to give a substantially uniform lift for a given piston movement regardless of lateral displacement of the foot member within determined limits.

14. In a steering accessory, a lift element, a foot member therefor, a piston formed thereon, a cylinder in Which the piston can reciprocate, means supporting the lift element for universal movement on the vehicle, means tending to prevent transverse displacement of the element, means tending to prevent longitudinal displacement of the element, a source of fluid under pressure adapted to operate the piston to elongate the element, and means adapted to give a substantially uniform lift for a given piston movement regardless of lateral displacement of the foot member within determined limits.

l5. In a steering accessory, a lift element, means permitting it to be held out of operative position with its longitudinal axis substantially at right angles to that of the vehicle, a foot member therefor, a piston formed thereon, a cylinder in which the piston can reciprocate, a source of fluid under pressure adapted to operate the piston to elongate the element, means adapted to give a substantially uniform lift for a given piston movement regardless of lateral displacement of the foot member Within determined limits and a release mechanism permitting return of the piston to its initial position.

16. In a steering accessory, a lift element,

means supporting the lift element for universal movement on the vehicle, a foot member therefor, a piston formed thereon, a cylinder in which the piston can reciprocate, a source of fluid under pressure adapted to operate the piston to elongate the element, means adapted to give a substantially uniform lift for a given piston movement regardless of lateral displacement of the foot member Within determined limits and a release mechanism permitting return of the piston to its initial position.

17. In a steering accessory, a lift element, means supporting the lift element for universal movement on the vehicle, cam means cooperating with the element to give a substantially uniform lift regardless of lateral displacement of the element, a foot member therefor, a piston formed thereon, a cylinder in Which the piston can reciprocate, and a source of fluid under pressure adapted to operate the piston to elongate the` element.

18. In a steering accessory, a lift element adapted to be elongated presenting a relatively broad base, bracing means cooperating with the base to present a lift element substantially the JOI-IN LESTER BARR.

a lift element.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2459016 *Jan 4, 1946Jan 11, 1949Abe CohenVehicle antiskid mechanism and wheel jack
US2792210 *Jul 23, 1953May 14, 1957Starr Morton HVehicle load elevating and indicating mechanisms
US3273858 *Jul 16, 1964Sep 20, 1966Woods Coburn FranklinTrailer tongue elevator
US3279755 *Jan 11, 1965Oct 18, 1966Redeman CorpMulti-stage hydraulic hoist
US7103995Feb 19, 2003Sep 12, 2006Curtis Industries Holdings, LlcJack for a working implement and method
US7228650 *Nov 18, 2004Jun 12, 2007Curtis Industries LlcJack for a working implement and method
US7260902Nov 18, 2004Aug 28, 2007Curtis Industries LlcJack for a working implement and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/761, 254/422
International ClassificationB60S9/10, B60S9/00, B62D9/00
Cooperative ClassificationB60S9/10, B62D9/00
European ClassificationB62D9/00, B60S9/10