Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2143198 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 10, 1939
Filing dateDec 24, 1932
Priority dateDec 24, 1932
Publication numberUS 2143198 A, US 2143198A, US-A-2143198, US2143198 A, US2143198A
InventorsGagne Augustin, Robert H Lawson
Original AssigneeHemphill Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knitting machine and method of knitting
US 2143198 A
Abstract  available in
Images(10)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

KNITTING MAGHINE'AND METHOD OF KNITTING Filed Dec. 24, 1932 10 Sheets-Sheet 1 [NYE/VTOR5: R0551? TH 13/; wsozg flucw; TIN GA GA/Zf Gttomeg Jan- 10, 1939- R. H. LAWSON E1 AL KNITTING MACHINE AND METHOD OF KNITTING 10 Sheets-Sheet 2 m z 2 ea 9 NM 0. Ge 6 J a 0 mm o mm N\ 0? Z 09 a. a @m mm 0 2 P r 0 N B e m a? a 2. m5. 1 I E a 2 m H Q N e mm. m 2 Fm .NwUNLN R0351? THLAWJM HUCUSTJN CACHE: BY 7 Gttorneg Jan. 10, 1939. R. H LAWSON ET AL 2,143,198

KNITTING MACHINE AND METHOD OF KNITTING Filed Dec. 24, 1932 10 Sheets-Shet 5 F163. Eel

IIIIIIIIIIIJ IllIIHIHHIIIIIIIllIIlllllIlllllllllllllllllll J/JVYENTORS: fiogzleTfflAwsmg flZ/CUWW; Y A

(Thomcg Jan. 10, 1939. R. H. LAWSON ET AL KNITTING MACHINE AND METHOD OF KNITTING Filed Dec 24, 1952 10 Sheets-Sheet 4 Jan. 10, 1939. R. H. LAWSON ET AL 2,143,193

KNITTING MACHINE AND METHOD OF KNITTING Filed Dec. 24, 1952 10 Sheets-Sheet 5 zvmwrozes: R0BERTH LAM/3.015;

(Ittorneg Jan. 10, 1939. R. H. LAWSON ET A1. 2,143,198

KNITTING MACHINE AND METHOD OF KNITTING Filed Dec. 24, 1952 10 sheets-sheet 6 Flat}.

fNYENTflRS: ROBERTHLAWSoM 55 HUG Z/S'TIN 62mm; 109 7 y 290% ATTy.

.Fan. 10, 1939. R H. LAWSON ET AL KNITTING MACHINE AND METHOD OF KNITTING Filed Dec. 24, 1952 10 Sheets-Sheet 7 I [NI/51y TURS: RmERTH LAX/K7013],

A 114' UJTIZV' GAGA/E Gttorneg Jan. 10, 1939. R. H. LAWSON ET AL KNITTING MACHINE AND METHOD OF KNITTING i0 Sheets-Sheet 8 Filed Dec. 24, 1952 [N YENZ'WRSJ [P0351 375 [A W801! Am: USTJN CA CNE Y 3% (Ittorucg 1939- R. H. LAWSON ET AL 2,143,193

"KNITTING MACHINE AND METHOD OF KNITTING Fil ed Dec. 24, 1932 10 Sheets-Sheet 9 FIG-16.

N g; G

I 1 a Z/VI/EJYYWRS:

Q" ZEOBERTHZAWSWV, n;

Ail/g 05 27131 6'12 azvEj ATTy.

Jan. 10, 1939. R. H. LAWSON ET AL 2,143,198

KNITTING MACHINE AND METHOD OF KNITTING Filed Dec. 24, 1932 10 Sheets-Sheet l0 R0BERTH LAWSMY, A 11 USTJJY CA GIV ATTjy.

INVENTORS:

Patented Jan. Nit 1.9 3%

entree stares Parser OFFICE EMITTING MACHINE AND METHOD KNITTING Robert H. Lawson, Fawtuclrei, and Augustin Gagne, Central Falls, E. 1., designers to Hemphill Company, Gentral Falls, Kit. 1., a corporation of Massachusetts This invention relates to reverse plating and more especially to reverse plating with three or more threads or yarns. as herein disclosed, the mechanism for effecting the reverse plating is applied to a knitting machine of the type disclosed in the patent to Hemphill 933,443, September 7, 1909, although the invention is not limited to a knitting machine having a rotary needle cylinder and furthermore is not limited to hosiery knitting machines nor to knitting machines having a circular series of needles.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a view in elevation of a portion of a knitting machine with theimprovements applied;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the parts shown in ig. 1;

Fig.3 is a view of the machine in end elevation;

Fig. 4 is a view in rear elevation of a portion of the machine;

Fig. 4a is a view in side elevation showing the drum of Fig. 4;

Fig. 5 is a view in elevation and partly in section, of that portion of the mechanism above the circular base;

Figs. 6 and 7 are elevational views taken at right angles to one another showing the means for effecting the periodic changes in the relative positions of the two plating threads;

Figs. 8, 9, 10 and 11 are detail views of the means disclosed in Figs. 6 and 7;

Fig. 12 is an enlarged plan view of a portion of the mechanism shown in Fig. 2;

Figs. 13 and 14 are respectively fragmentary plan and elevational views showing the immediate control for reversing the relative positions of the plating threads;

Fig. 15 is a fragmentary view of the latch ring showing the plating thread carrier in front elevation, in an elevated, inoperative position;

Fig. 16 is a fragmentary view similar to Fig. 15

but showing the threadmarrier at right anglesto the position shown in Fig. 15;

Fig. 1'1 is a fragmentary view of the latch ring, showing the two plating threads in one of their relative positions;

Fig. 18 is a view similar to Fig. 17 but showing the two plating threads in the other of their relative positions;

19 is a detail view of a yarn lever; Figs. 20 and 21 are fragmentary views of the portion ofith'e ring comprising the mouthpiece,

said views also showing a body and two plating threads being fed to the needles of a knitting machine, Fig. 20 showing one body threadbeing fed to the needles and Fig. 21 showing another;

Figs. 22 and'23 are similar to Figs. 20 and 21 respectively, but show the plating relations of a body and plating thread as having been reversed in the needle hooks by some well known reverse plating means;

Fig. 24 is a detail view of a needle showing the position of three threads in the needle hook and corresponding to Fig. 20; and

Fig. 25 is a view similar to Fig. 24 but corresponding to Fig. 22.

The knitting machine indicated generally by the numeral I is provided with a needle cylinder 2 within the tricks or grooves of which are mounted needles 2' which slide to and from knitting position in the usual manner. Surmounting the needle cylinder 2 is a sinker head 3 of usual construction. The frame of the machine includes a circular base 4 within which is mounted a socalled ring gear (not shown) which imparts continuous rotary or reclprocatory movements to the needle cylinder 2 in a manner common to hosiery knitting machines. Mounted upon the upper surface of the circular base 4 is the usual widenlng pick bracket 5 and diametrically opposite thereto is a cam plate 6 which surrounds the trolling the movements of the needles, the cams including the usual cams carried by the cam block 1 upon which are mounted narrowing picks 8. Instep cams 9 are mounted upon a suitable bracket l0 itself attached to the cam plate 6, the cams thereof being operated in the usual manner to elevate the long butt needles prior to the knitting-of heels and toes and to restore such needles to a knitting level at the completion of the knitting of heels and toes. Spaced from the cam block 1 is a bracket H connected to a suitable part of the machine frame upon which bracket are mounted 'aseries of cam discs I! adapted selectively to control the radial positions of a series of plungers 13 which in turn act upon Jacks or other elements which cause sinkers selectively to efle'ct reverse plating. The discs 12 are mounted upon a drum 14 which is provided with a ratchet l5 periodically engaged by a. pawl means 16 whereby the discs I 2 variably actuate their respective plungers l3. Pivotally motmted (Fig. 2) upon a bracket I! carried by the circular base 4, is the usual latch ring it which is provided with-the usual mouth-piece extension I! within which are pivotally mounted upon a. pivot pin 20 yarn levers 2i and 21. Also mounted upon the upper surface of the latch ring I8 at the mouthpiece I9 and upon the pivot pin 20 is a yarn lever 23, the said yarn lever (Figs. 13-19) including a member 24 in which is mounted a pin or shaft 25 to which is fastened a gear-like member 26 meshing with which is a segmental rack 21 which rack is pivoted intermediate its ends as at 28 to a bracket plate 29 which is fastened to and forms part of the yarn lever 23. The rack 21 is pro vided with an arm (Fig. 2) to which is pivotally connected at 30 a link 3| which is slidable and is guided in its sliding movements by means of a bracket 32 attached to the upper surface of plate 29. The segmental rack 21 is moved to the full line position of Fig. 13 by means about to be described, against the tension of the spring 32' which is attached at one end to one arm of the rack 21 and at its other end to plate 29.

In Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 5-14 inclusive, the actuating means for periodically and automatically controlling the movements of the rack to and from the positions shown in full and dotted lines, Fig. 13, are shown. The means for moving rack 21-and as a consequence thereof oscillating the gear 26 and the pin or shaft 25 to which it is connected, thereby to cause either the eye 33 or the eye 34, both of which are connected to the shaft 25, to maintain its thread in advance of the other thread-includes one arm 35 of a lever which arm terminates in a hub 36' made fast to a shaft 31 by means of a set screw 38. The arm 35 when in the position shown in Fig. 14 causes the eye 33 to position its thread in advance of the thread companion to the eyelet 34, but when the arm 35 is moved to the position shown in full lines, Fig. 5, the spring 32' causes the eyelet 34 to position its thread in advance of the thread passing through the eyelet 33. The arm 35 when inthe position last named is in engagement with an adjustable stop screw 39 which is carried by a bracket 40 itself made fast to the cap plate 4| of yarn lever box 42. The shaft 31 is supported in bearings in upstanding lugs 43, 48 carried by the plate 4 I, and the other end of the shaft 31 which projects beyond the bearing lug 44 has rigidly connected thereto a depending lever arm 45, a set screw 66 constituting the rigid connection between the shaft 31' and the hub 41 of the arm as. The depending end of the arm 45 terminates in a hub 98 through which passes a pin 49 the projecting end of which is received within a bifurcation 50 of a lever 5| which lever is pivoted intermediate its ends at 52 to the yarn lever box 42 and atits lower end is pivotally connected at 53 to an adjustable link 54 which link in turn is pivotally connected at its other end at 55 to one arm 56. The arm 56 constitutes one arm of a lever said arm being rigidly connected to a shaft 51 as by means of a set screw 58. The other arm 59 of the said lever is spaced from the arm 56 and is also rigidly connected to the shaft 51 as by means of a set screw 60. The shaft 51 is pivotally supported in bearings comprising upright lugs GI and 62 which are part of a bracket 63 which is made fast to an extension of the circular base 9. To the outer end of the arm 59 is pivotally connected as at 64 (Figs. 3 and 5) a depending link 65. Surrounding the link 65 below the base 4 is a coil spring 66, the spring at one end bearing against the lower side of the base 4 and at its other end resting upon a collar 61 made fast to the link 65 intermediate its ends as by means of a set screw 68. The link 65 is made of two adjustably connected parts, the

' parts 65 thereof (Figs. 3, 6-11) being pivotally connected at 69 to a rod 10 to which is connected,

a cam H by means of which cam the link 10 and connected parts are periodically actuated in a manner hereinafter to be more fully described.

The means for periodically actuating the link 10 and parts connected thereto comprise mechanism disclosed in detail in Figs. 2, 3, 4 and 6-12 inclusive. A ratchet wheel 12 is provided upon the periphery of which are a series of equally spaced teeth 13,the teeth being continuous excepting at 14 where a half-tooth is provided. The ratchet wheel is advanced by means of two pawls 15 and 16 which pawls are mounted upon a common axis 11 such axis being eccentrically disposed upon a side face of a wheel 18 which is mounted upon a shaft 19 which shaft passes through the machine frame being connected 'at the other side of the frame to a pinion which is in mesh with the I04 gear 8 I. The pinion 80 is provided with twenty-six teeth whereas the gear 8| has one hundred and four teeth the result being that the shaft I9 and wheel 18 are rotated once during the knitting of each course and as a consequence thereof the pawls 15, 16 are actuated once for each course of knitting. The relative positions of the pawls and ratchet wheel 12 in Figs. 6 and 7 show the said parts at the end of the retiming operation during which the pawl 15 has advanced the ratchet wheel 12 in order to get the pattern lugs 82 which are mounted on one side face of the ratchet wheel 12 adjacent to the teeth thereof in proper circumferential position for the starting of the next stocking or half hose. During the retiming of the pattern disc or ratchet 12 a pawl idler 83 is in theposition shown in Fig. 9 in which position an end 84 of the idler is underneath the pawl 16 which pawl reciprocates along the upper surface of the idler. After the pawl 15 has advanced the ratchet wheel 12 to the position shown in Fig. 6 the said pawl idly reciprocates along the space left by the missing portion of the tooth at 14 and the parts remain in the position shown in Fig. 6 until it is time to commence the knitting of the next stocking at which time the pawl idler 83 is specially actuated for which purpose the said idler is connected to a lever 85 which is pivoted at 86 and to the free end of which is pivotally connected at 81 a link 88 which at its upper end is pivotally connected at 89 (Figs. 3, 4 and 12) to a bell crank lever 90 which in turn is pivotally mounted upon the shaft 51 being restrained against en'dwise movement thereon by the lug 62 and by a collar 9| which is fastened to the shaft 51 as by means of a screw 92. To the other arm of the bell crank lever 90 is pivotally connected at 93 an adjustable link 94 which at its other end is pivotally connected at 95 to another bell crank lever 96 pivoted at 91 to a bracket 98 connected to the circular base 4. .Pivotally connected at 99 to the other end of the bell crank lever 96 and depending therefrom is an adjustable link I00 pivoted at IOI to one arm of a lever I02 pivoted intermediate its ends. The other arm of the lever I02 terminates in a cam follower I03, normally maintained in engagement with the surface of a drum I04-or cams I05 and I06 which are mounted upon the surface thereof. The drum I04 is rigidly mounted upon the main cam shaft I01 of the machine which, preferably, is periodically advanced so as to move through 360 degrees during the knitting of each stocking or half hose.

When retiming of the ratchet wheel 12v has been completed and the knitting of the next stocking or half hose is about to commence, the cam drum I04 is advanced, the toe or follower I03 dropping off the cam I06 and onto the surface of the drum analo we at I08 which movement of the cam follower its permits the lever 85, through the connections hereinbefore described, to move from one position to a position where the pawl idler 33 is moved from under the pawl I6, whereupon the next advancing movement imparted to such pawl causes said pawl to advance the ratchet wheel H by engaging a tooth 13 thereof after which the pawls I5 and I6 both engage the wide teeth 73 and advance the ratchet wheel "I2 once for each course of knitting. As the ratchet-wheel I2 advances, either the pins or lugs 82 are brought opposite the cam H in which case the said cam is elevated and the rack 2I-through the connections hereinbefore described-is moved to the position shown in Figs. 2 and ,13 whereupon the thread passing through the eyelet 33 is moved to a position forward of the thread passing through the eyelet'34; or when the ratchet wheel 12 has been advanced to such a position that lugs 82 are not opposite or underneath the cam H, such cam is permitted to drop, whereupon the thread passing through the eyelet 34 is moved to a, position forward of the thread passing through the eyelet 33. The advancing movements of the ratchet wheel 12 continue, the pattern being repeated for each number of courses equal to the number of teeth I3; unless it be desirable to repeat the pattern for a number of courses less than that represented by the teeth 13, in which case pins or lugs I09, which are mounted in a circular series on one face of the ratchet wheel 12 and within the circle defined by the pins 82, are made discontinuous by leaving out one or two pins II19 as indicated at H0. As shown in Figs. 3 and 6 a cam III is rigidly attached to one face of a slidable rod H2 which rod is guided at one end by means of a pin or screw H3 passing through a slot II 4 provided in the said rod, the

pin or screw being in threaded engagement with a bracket II 5. The rod H2 at its upper end is bifurcated as at H6 the arms thereof straddling a pin or screw I I1 likewise secured to the bracket l 55. The pin and slot connections just described permit the rod H2 to move longitudinally of the ratchet wheel I2 and likewise of the pawls I5 and I3. Adjacent to the upper end of the rod i I2 there is fastened a pawl idler H8 which when in the position indicated in Fig. 6 limits the effective movement of the pawls I5 and 1G to that measured by the distance between two ratchet teeth I3. When the ratchet wheel I2 is advanced to such a position that the space H0 is opposite the cam III such cam and connected parts are permittedto drop thereby withdrawing the idler Ht from under the pawls 15 and-I5 whereupon the said pawls are permitted to retract to such an extent as to engage a tooth 13, two teeth removed from the tooth engaged during the previous course of knitting the result being that the ratchet wheel 12 gains one tooth. 'The purpose of the space I II] is to permit a change in the set-up of the pattern to be knitted, e. g. if there be sixty teeth I3 and it be desirable to repeat the pattern every fifty-nine courses, a-single space III) is provided as shown, and if the pattern be one that should be repeated every fifty-eight courses two such spaces Hll are provided in the row of circular lugs I99.

If the number of teeth 13 corresponds to the number of courses of the pattern to be knitted, the pins or lugs I09 may be dispensed with and a detent or look H9 may be substituted therefor. The detent H9 is pivoted at I20 to the rod H2 and at its upper end is provided with a proseparation of the three threads, the pin or shaft 20 may be mounted in an eccentric I22 which may be subsequently adjusted manually or otherwise and when in the proper circumferential position may be fixed against circumferential movement a as by means of a set screw I22.

In Figs. 20-25 inclusive are shown various relations of two body threads I 23 and I24 and two plating threads I25 and I26. In Fig. 20 the body thread I23 is shown as being knitted into the fabric with plating threads I25 and I26, whereas in Fig. 21 the body thread I24 is shown as be'ng knitted into the fabric with threads I25 and I26. In the said figures the thread I23 is shown as passing through an eyelet in the lever 2 I, the thread I 24 is shown as passing through an eyelet provided in the lever I22, and the threads I 25 and I26 are shown as passing through the eyelets 33 and 34 respectively. Thus by the construction hereinbefore described, the threads I25 and I26 may be knitted into the fabric together with either the thread I 23 or the thread I24, the means for automatically turning the shaft or spindle 25 permitting the threads I25 and I26 to exchange positions at will during the 3 knitting of the fabric. Figs. 22 and 23 corre-- spond respectively to Figs. 20 and 21 excepting that in Figs. 22 and 23 the plating relations of the threads is shown as being difierent from that in Figs. 20 and 21, in that the threads I25, at one or more of the needles, is shown as being the intermediate and as having changed positions with the thread I26, the position of the threads in Fig. 22 being shown in vertical elevation in a needle hook in Fig. 25.

It will be understood that the plating relations of a body thread and a plating thread may be varied in any well known manner such as by specially constructed sinkers or by needle deflection to effect the changes indicated in Figs. 22-25 as compared with Figs. 20 and 21.

If desired tension may be applied to the threads I25 and I2t while the threads I23 and I24 are being fed to the needles substantially free from tension.

Although in the foregoing description and the drawings the pattern mechanism disclosed specifically in Figs. 6-11 inclusive,'is disclosed as for the purpose of interchangeably p:sitioning two plating threads with respect to the needles, it is obvious that such mechanisms may be used for other purposes.

During heel and toe knitting the drum M is rendered inoperative by being swung away from the needle cylinder and for this purpose a lever I27 (Fig. 2), to one end of which the drum is connected, is provided. To the other arm of the lever I 21 is connected a link I 28 which is automatically actuated in any desired manner for withdrawing the drum to an inoperative position.

Means such as a bell crank lever I29 pivoted at I 39 to the machine frame may be provided, such lever being for the purpose of limiting the movement of the pawl I6 so that, when the lever I29 is in the position shown in Fig. 2, said pawl is adapted to advance the drum I4 through an are measured by the length of one tooth I5. When the lever I29 is swung upon its pivot, against the tension of a spring I3I, by any suitable means, the pawl I6 is permitted to rack the drum through an are measured by the length of two teeth I5.

A cam I32 (Fig. 3) which is mounted upon a drum fixed to shaft I01, may be provided for acting upon a lever I33 pivoted at I34 to a bracket I35 connected to the machine frame. To the other arm of the lever I33 is pivotally connected a slidably adjustable link I36 to the other end of which link is pivotally connected a lever I31 pivoted intermediate its ends at I38 to any suitable support. A spring I38, connected to lever I33 and one part of link I36, maintains the two parts of said link I36 in telescopic relation. The other arm of the lever I31 is bifurcated at I39, the arms thereof straddling a pin I40 laterally projecting from a detent or lock I which is provided intermediate its ends with a notch I32. When the drum is advanced to such a position as to cause the cam I32 to engage and rock the lever I33 such lever is rocked against the retractile force of spring I43, the rocking of such lever causing the detent HI to be swung upon its pivot I thereby elevating the shoulder defined by the notch I32 to such a position as to engage a lug I35 of the pawl carrying mechanism to prevent the pawl from advancing the drum It. A cam or cams such as I32 may be provided for rendering the drum inoperative at any desired time such as during the knitting of a heel of a stocking.

The pawl I8 is actuated from the Hit gear III which carries upon one surface thereof, preferably, four pins I33 which thus engage a suitable cam I l'I during the knitting of each course. The cam Ifill is made fast to a lever I38 pivoted at I43 to a suitable bracket I53 carried by the machine frame. The other end of the lever I38 has pivotally connected thereto at IEI an adjustable link I52, the other end of which is pivotally connected at I53 to the pawl carrying mechanism.

In the foregoing description the threads or yarns I25, I 26 have been, for convenience, referred to as plating yarns" and the threads or yarns I23, I 24 have been referred to as body yarns"; however, when knitting a plated .fabric with two or more yarns, each thread or yarn overlies the other yarn or yarns so that any one of the yarns may be considered to be a plating yarn.

In the foregoing description, specific terms have been used for specificallydescribing the several elements disclosed in the drawings; however, it is not the intention to limit the scope of the invention to the precise details of construction shown and described other than as defined by the specific recitations in the claims themselves.

We claim:

1. A method of continuously knitting three threads consisting in causing one such thread to be maintained in separated plating relation with respect to the other two threads and causing such other two threads to change their relative positions with respect to each other and with respect to, the thread first mentioned, and causing one ori the other of the two threads second mentioned tol appear on the face of the fabric and selectively causing the thread first mentioned to appear on the face'of the fabric at selected wales whereby the three threads shall appear on the face of the fabric.

2. A method of knitting consisting in feeding a body thread and two plating threads to the needles, maintaining substantially the same tension on the two plating threads and interchangeably causing first one such plating thread and then the other plating thread to appear on the face of the fabric, and causing the plating thread and a body thread to interchange their positions at will, whereby reversely plated fabric may be knitted.

3. In a knitting machine, needles and means for simultaneously feeding a body thread and at least two plating threads to the needles, the plating threads being fed to the needles under substantially the same tension, said means including two thread guides, in combination with means for automatically interchanging the positions of the two thread guides, and other means for causing the body thread to appear on the face of the fabric in selected wales to displace either of the two plating threads.

4. In a knitting machine, needles and means for feeding at least one body thread and one plating thread thereto, in combination with means for adjustably positioning the plating thread thereby to permit the plating separation of the two threads to be varied.

5. A knitting machine, a pattern member having indications thereon for controlling the operations of the knitting machine, such pattern member having ratchet teeth thereon in combination with two pawls for engaging the ratchet teeth and thereby advancing the member, one of the teeth of the member being a half-tooth thereby effecting the idling of one of the pawls, in combination with means adapted to idle one of the pawls while permitting the other pawl to advance the pattern member to retime the same, such pattern member coming to rest when the half-tooth moves to a position opposite the retiming pawl.

6. Yarn feeding mechanism for knitting machines comprising a guide for a. yarn, a pair of guides for other yarns each of said pair of guides being adapted to feed its yarn to all of the needles, and means to move either of said pair of guides at will, relatively to the first mentioned yarn guide, into feeding position on the same side of the said guide, whereby to ensure like association of either of said other yarns with the yarn first mentioned.

7. A knitting machine having a rotary needle cylinder and a stationary mouthpiece, yarn guides in the mouthpiece for feeding at least three yarns to the needles, two of the said guides independently feeding two of the said yarns to the needles and being positioned at the same side of the guide for feeding the third yarn, the two guides first mentioned being interchangeably moved to and from feeding position with respect to the needles so that the like association of either of the said two yarns with the third yarn is ensured.

8. A knitting machine having a rotary needle cylinder and a stationary mouthpiece, yarn guides in the mouthpiece for feeding at least four yarns to the needles, two of the said guides independently feeding two of the said yarns to the needles and being positioned at the same side of the guides for feeding the two other yarns, the two guides first mentioned being interchangeably moved to and from feeding position'with respect to the needles so that the like association of either of the said two yarns with the two other yarns is ensured.

9. A circular knittingmachine having means for feeding two yams or threads to the needles thereof. said feeding means including a rotary element the axis of which is parallel to the needles, the rotary element when in one position feeding two yarns to the needles in a plating relation and when in another position feeding the yarns to the needles in a reversed plating relation, the movements of the rotary element to and from each of its positions being upon its axis.

10. A circular knitting machine and means for feeding at least two yarns to the, needles and in a plating relation, and rotary means the axis of which is parallel to the needles for changing the plating relation in which the two,threads are fed to the needles, said means last mentioned including a pinion and a gear for imparting oscillatory movements to the pinion to change the plating relation of the two threads, a pattern mechanism and connections leading from the gear to the pattern mechanism for controlling the oscillatory movements of the pinion thereby to determine when the plating relations of the threads shall be changed.

11. In a knitting machine, pattern mechanism and means for feeding at least two threads to the .needles in addition to the ground thread and in such a manner that either of the two threads with respect to the needles and with respect to each other including a vertically extending yarn V guiding element having two yarn conducting openings therein, means for rotating said element about its axis including a gear on the element, a sector meshing therewith and mechanical connections from said pattern mechanism to said sector for imparting rotation to the element whereby the position of the said two threads may be reversed with respect to the ground thread.

12. A method. of knitting three threads so that pear on the outer face of the fabric, said method including imposing substantially the same tension on two of the threads and less than on the other thread.

13. A method of knitting three threads so that any one of the three threads may optionally appear on the outer face of the fabric, said method including feeding two of the threads to the needles in a substantially spaced relation with respect to the third thread and acting upon the third thread at selected wales so that, at the said wales, the third thread shall appear on the outer face of the fabric, the operation being such that at the other wales either one of the first two threads shall appear on the outer face of the fabric, and causing. the first two threads to change their position with respect to one another so that one such thread and then the other such thread shall appear on the outer face of the fabric where not displaced by the third thread.

14. A knitting machine having means for feeding at least three threads to the needles, one at least of said three threads being fed to the needles in a spaced relation with respect to the other threads, means acting upon the thread feeding means to cause first one and then another of the said other threads to appear on the outer face of the fabric at certain wales, in combination with means selectively acting in such a manner that a first mentioned thread shall appear on the outer face of the fabric at selected wales.

15. A knitting machine having means for feeding at least three threads to the needles, one at least of said three threads being fed to the needles in a spaced relation with respect to the other threads, means acting upon the thread feeding means to cause first one and then another of the said other threads to appear on the outer face of the fabric at certain wales, in combination with sinkers selectively acting in such a manner that a first mentioned thread shall appear on the outer Y face of the fabric at selected wales.

16. A knitting machine having means for feeding at least three threads to the needles, and including a rotary member, one at least of said three threads being fed to the needles in a spaced relation with respect to the other threads, means rotating the said rotary member to cause first one and then another of the said other threads to appear on the outer face of the fabric at certainwales, in combination withmeans selectively acting in such a manner that a first mentioned thread shall appear on the outer face of the fabric at selected wales.

17. A knitting machine having means for feeding at least three threads to the needles, and including a rotary member, one at least of said three threads being fed to the needles in a spaced relation with respect to the other threads, means rotating the said rotary member to cause first one and then another of the said other threads to appear on the outer face of the fabric at certain wales, in combination with sinkers selectively acting in such a manner that a first mentionedthread shall appear on the outer face of the fabric at selected wales. any one of the three threads may optionally ap- 18. A method of feeding four threads to the needles and continuously knitting three of the said threads andcausing the fourth thread to be interchangeably fed to the needles with one of the other threads, knitting two of the threads continuously and periodically changing their relative positions so that either one of the said two threads may appear on the outer face of the fabric at will and causing whichever of the first mentioned threads is being fed to the needles, to

displace, on the outer face of the fabric, whichever of the two continuously knitted threads is being knitted so as to appear on the outer face of the fabric.

19. A knitting machine having pattern means

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4346571 *Jul 3, 1980Aug 31, 1982Arrigo MichelettiCircular knitting machines
US4413483 *Sep 30, 1980Nov 8, 1983Bentley Engineering Company LimitedControl mechanism for circular knitting machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/137, 66/237
International ClassificationD04B9/26
Cooperative ClassificationD04B9/26, D04B9/28
European ClassificationD04B9/26, D04B9/28