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Publication numberUS2144263 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 17, 1939
Filing dateNov 21, 1936
Priority dateNov 21, 1936
Publication numberUS 2144263 A, US 2144263A, US-A-2144263, US2144263 A, US2144263A
InventorsJohn D Lane
Original AssigneeRalph H Wilbur
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of and machine for making tie bands
US 2144263 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 17, 1939. I J. D LANE METHOD OF AND MACHINE FOR MAKING TIE BANDS Filed Nov. 2l, 1956 Patented Jan. 17, 19394 l y ,UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE John D. Lane, Boston, Mass., assigner to Ralph H. Wilbur, Melrose,Mass.

Application November 21, 1936, Serial No. 112,116

7 Claims.

This invention relates to a method of and machine for making tie-bands of paper or the like that are put to use withtheir end portions in bonded overlapping relationship; It deals more especially with the manufacture of bands conforming to my Patent No. 2,000,763, dated May 7, 1935, accordingto which the bands carry on only a pair of opposite faces of opposite end port'ons a dry coating of latex or equivalent composition cohesive to a similar coating but non- /adhesive to a paper or other ordinary surface. Because the use of a band of this type requires merely the bringing together of its opposite end portions into contacting overlapping relationship, it represents an important improvement over the usual tie-band coated at either end portion with dry gum or adhesive that must be moistened or otherwise activated in orderto exert the desired bonding eifect.

An objective of the present invention is to make possible high-speed and low-cost production of the foregoing type of bands. Another objective is to insure .bands that are not only ready for use by the consumer but that are in substantially flat condition and can hence be properly piled or stacked for packaging and shipment. Another objective is to produce the finished bands continuously from a moving web of paper of an indefinite length, for instance, from a paper web as it is being progressively unwound from a roll. Still another objective is to produce the finished band .by a method and machine requiring little supervision and plant space. c

With the foregoing and other objectives and features in View, the present invention will now be described in some detail` with reference to the accompanying drawing, wherein- Figure 1 depicts somewhat diagrammatically in perspective a machine for practicing the methodI .3 `bonding composition, preferably fluent rubber latex composition, which gives a dried coating readily cohesive to a similar coating but nonadheslve to a paper or other usual surface. Each instrumentality may, as best appears in Figure 2, include a stationary support I2 to which may be hingedly secured, as at I3, an inclined nozzle 4 for applying the liquid bonding composition. The liquid bonding composition may be fed under pressure from a suitable source (not shown) through a pipe I5 into the receiving chamber I6 of the nozzle; and the flow of the composition into the nozzle may be regulated by a needle valve Il threaded thereinto whose pointed or, needle end may be adjusted from the outside by a knurled head |90 to open or close to the desired extent a passageway I8 leading from the receiving chamber I6 to the discharge opening I9 at the upper end of the nozzle. The nozzle may, as shown, take the form of a wedge of progressively increasing width but of tapering thickness toward its discharge opening I9. whichmay consist of a narrow slit of suiiicient length to deposit composition over a substantial marginal area of the paper web.

The discharge or upper end of the nozzle is stationed, as appears in Figure 2, barely to clear the progressively moving paper surface as the paper web is being backed up by a resilient or yielding roll 20 against which it is pressed by a pair of spaced rollers 2| each located immediately next to a side of the nozzle and making pressing contact with the paper surface immediately below the point at which composition is discharged from the nozzle and is deposited on the paper. The rollers 2| may be rotatably mounted at the vupper end portions of the arms 22 of a yoke 23 hingedlyI secured. as at 24, tothe lower end portion of the nozzle I4. The desired pressing contact of the rollers 2| with the paper web may be afforded by a tension spring 25, one end portion of which engages a lower end portion of the yoke 23 and the other end portion of which engages the support I2. The upper end or discharge opening of the nozzle |4 may be maintained at the desired clearance from the paper web by an adjusting screw 26 passing through and rotatably xed to the yoke 23 and threaded into the body of the nozzle. The rollers 2| thus keep the paper web smoothly pressed against the roll 20 so that the composition may be applied as a thin, substantially uniform or even coating as it flows continuously and in regulated amount from the nozzle onto the region of the web immediately above the points of application of pressure onto the web.

After'the paper web has moved past the coating instrumentalitles and the rubber latex or equivalent bonding composition has been depos-` ited as stripes or coatings`S on only a pair of opposite faces of its marginal or side edge portions, the coated web is progressively dried, as by passage over a steam-heated drier drum 30. Inasmuch as the drying of the coatings tends to cause curling of the marginal portions of the paper web, it is desirable to offset this tendency at least in part by moistening the uncoated face of the web immediately in back of each coating; and, to this end, the periphery of the roll 20 may be made of felt, sponge rubber or equivalent resilient, absorptive materialv and be kept moist with water supplied constantly and in regulated amount, as from a. drip pipe 3l, so'as to moisten or wet the appropriate uncoated areas of the web.

It might be noted that the tendency in drying the coated web is to render its coated surface concave and that wetting of the uncoated surface in back of the coated surface tends to induce opposite curling or shrinkage forces in subsequent drying and thus to offset at least in part the curling of the coated web areas. The dried coated paper web coming from the drum 30 may be delivered into the nip of a pair of rolls 32 whichserve to crease the coated web areas transversely at spaced intervals and thus to destroy any residual curling tendencies therein.Thus, an end portion of one roll periphery may be provided with ribs or teeth 32a and the corresponding end portion of the other roll periphery provided with recesses 3217 into which the paper is forced to form a succession of transverse creases or tiny ribs in the coated paper zones. It might be noted that the tiny ribs thus formed project from the uncoated face at each edge portion of the paper web and that, accordingly, one end portion of each roll periphery is ribbed and the other end portion is recessed, as already described.

The creased paper web is led from the rolls 32 over a backing plate 33 and thence to a stationary upper knife 34 fixed to suitable framework (not shown). At predetermined timed intervals a lower knife 35 fixed to a pair of spaced cranks 36 is caused to oscillate in an arcuate path until its upper cutting edge 35a moves past the lower cutting edge 34a of the knife 34 and thus to cut oif a paper band b of the desired width from the paper web. The arcuate oscillatory movement of the cranks 36 to move the knife 35 into an out of cutting engagement with the stationary knife 34 may be effected by suitable means (not shown). While the knife 35 is approaching the knife 34 and is cutting off a band of the desired width from the paper web, the web is held from further downward movement past the cutting edge 34a by a pair of gripping fingers 31 that force the web against the backing plate 33. The gripping fingers may be fixed, as shown, to an oscillating shaft 38 whose oscillation by suitable means (not shown) is effected in such timed relationship to the oscillatory movement of the knife 35 as to bring the fingers 31 into gripping contact with the paper web and thus to hold it against the backing plate 33 and permit it to accumulate above the knife 34 during the cutting stroke of the knife 35 and to disengage the fingers from the web and thus to permit the forward or downward movement of the web past -the cutting edge 34a during the retractive stroke of the knife 35.

Each paper band b as it issues from the machine may be provided with a plurality of spaced transverse creases c at its edge portion which keeps it substantially fiat. Were no such creases stack. The stack may thus be packed satisfactorily as in a wrapper or carton for storage and/or shipment to the consumer.

It is to be understood that the various rolls shown in the drawing may be supported for rotation by suitable bearings and that they may be rotated to feed the paper through the machine at the appropriate speed. Thus, the drier drum 30, whose interiormay be hollow and be supplied with steam as is known to those skilled in the art, may be caused to rotate by suitable means so as to unwind the paper from the supply roll Il; and the creasing rolls 32 may also bepositively driven at the same peripheral speed as the drier drum to feed the paper past the cutting knives. The paper web may be kept constantly against the backing plate 33, as by a series of tiny rollers 39 free to rotate on a shaft 40 during the forward or downward movement of the paper and remaining stationary and thus serving to hold the paper at spaced points between the ngers 31 when the latter exerts its gripping action on the paper web against the plate 33. It will be appreciated that various changes are possible in the machine and method herelnbefore described without departing from the spirit or scope of my invention as defined in the appended claims.

I am using the expressions paper and paper web in the foregoing description and in the appended claims in a generic sense to include paper or equivalent flexible or paperlike sheet materials, for instance, to include films, foils, or the like kcapable of being used as tie-bands. Thus, flexible film materials such as are sold on the market under the trade-marks Protectoid, Kodapak, etc., are meant to be included by the expressions paper and pape web.

I claim:

1. A method of making raper tie-bands adapted one longitudinal marginal portion thereof and also the opposite surface of the web along the opposite longitudinal marginal portion thereof with a fluent composition capable of yielding upon being dried a coating cohesive to a similar coating but non-adhesive to a paper surface, progressively drying the coated web, creasing the coated portions of the web transversely at predetermined, regularly spaced intervals to offset any curling tendencies in said portions, and cutting the creased web transversely at predetermined, regularly spaced intervals to produce said tie-bands.

2. A method of making paper tie-bands adapted to be bonded together by bringing their end portions into contacting overlapping relationship,

which comprises progressively coating one surface of a progressively moving paper web along only one longitudinal marginal portion thereof and also the opposite surface f the web along the opposite longitudinal marginal portion thereof 75 with rubber latex composition capable of yielding upon being dried a coating 4cohesive to asimilar coating but non-adhesive to a paper surface, moistening the uncoated web faces directly in back of said coated areas with water, progressively drying the coated and moistened web, and cutting the dried coated web transversely at predetermined, regularly spaced intervals to produce said tie-bands.

3. A method of making paper tie-bands adapted to be bonded together by bringing their end portions into contacting overlapping relationship, which comprises progressively coating one surface of a progressively moving paper web along only one longitudinal marginal portion thereof and also the opposite surface of the web along the opposite longitudinal marginal portion thereof with a fluent composition capable of yielding upon being dried a coating cohesive to a similar coating but non-adhesive to a paper surface, moistening the uncoated web faces directly in back of said coated areas with water, progressively drying the coated and Vmoistened web, creasing the coated portions of the web transversely at predetermined, regularly spaced intervals to offset any curling tendencies in said portions, and cutting the web transversely at predetermined, regularly spaced intervals to produce said tie-bands.

4. A method of making paper tie bands adapted to be bonded together by bringing their end portions into contacting overlapping relationship, which comprises progressively coating one surface of a progressively moving paper web along only one longitudinal marginal portion thereof and also the opposite surface of the web along the opposite longitudinal marginal portion thereof with rubber latex composition capable of yielding upon being dried a coating cohesive to a similar coating but non-adhesive to a paper surface, moistening the uncoated Web faces directly in back of said coated areas with water, progressively drying the coated and moistened web, creasing the coated portions of the web transversely at predetermined, regularly spaced intervals to create ribs therein protruding from the pre-moistened web faces and thereby to offset any curling tendencies in said portions, and cutting the creased web transversely at predetermined, regularly spaced intervals to produce said tie-bands.

5. A machine of the class described comprising instrumentalties for applying fluent coating composition to one surface of a progressively moving paper web along one longitudinal marginal portion thereof and simultaneously to the opposite surface of the web along the opposite longitudinal marginal portion thereof, means for progressively drying the coated web, means for creasing the coated portionsof the web transversely at predetermined, regularly spaced intervals, and means for cutting the creased web transversely at predetermined, regularly spaced intervals into bands.

6. A machine of the class described comprising instrumentalities for applying fluent coating composition to one surface of a progressively moving paper web along one longitudinal marginal portion thereof and simultaneously to the opposite surface of the web along the opposite longitudinal marginal portion thereof, means for progressively moistening the uncoated web faces directly in back of said coated areas with water, means for progressively drying the coated web, and means for cutting the dried web transversely at predetermined, regularly spaced intervals intl bands.

7. A machine of the class described comprising instrumentalities for applying uent coating composition to one surface of a progressively moving paper web along one longitudinal marginal portion thereof and simultaneously to the opposite surface of the web along the opposite longitudinal marginal portion thereof, means for progressively moistening the uncoated web faces immediately in back of said coated areas with water, means for progressively drying the coated web, means for creasing the coated portions of the web transverselyv at predetermined, regularly spaced intervals, and means for cutting the creased web transversely at predetermined, regularly spaced intervals into the bands.

JOHN D. LANE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2432074 *Aug 2, 1940Dec 2, 1947Copeman Lab CoCoated paper and method of producing the same
US2432075 *Nov 4, 1943Dec 2, 1947Copeman Lab CoRoll of sheet material with cohesive coating
US2441454 *Apr 11, 1944May 11, 1948Goss Printing Press Co LtdNewspaper striping device
US2558084 *Sep 26, 1947Jun 26, 1951Gwinn Myron BAdhesive applicator
US2747865 *Jun 2, 1951May 29, 1956Marshall Jr Joseph RBooklet forming means and method
US2757636 *Aug 27, 1954Aug 7, 1956G F Stephens And Company LtdApparatus for applying parallel lines of paint to a paper sheet
US2852407 *Feb 27, 1956Sep 16, 1958Millville Mfg CompanyMethod and apparatus for forming a textile material with an adhesive type selvage
US2878777 *Mar 1, 1956Mar 24, 1959United Shoe Machinery CorpTape coating and dispensing apparatus
US2878779 *Aug 10, 1955Mar 24, 1959Agfa AgStrip coating apparatus
US2965066 *Nov 21, 1958Dec 20, 1960United Shoe Machinery CorpApparatus for applying pressure-sensitive adhesive to sheet material
US3015916 *Jun 2, 1959Jan 9, 1962Denton Harvey RMeans and method for banding objects
US3081735 *Jan 18, 1960Mar 19, 1963Paul W ClarkIdentification of automatic business machine cards
US3593680 *Sep 5, 1969Jul 20, 1971Continental Illinois NationalAutomatic air painting apparatus
US4529636 *Jul 11, 1983Jul 16, 1985Mobil Oil CorporationFastening apparatus for twist ties
US4539237 *Jul 11, 1983Sep 3, 1985Mobil Oil CorporationFastening apparatus for twist ties
US4798574 *Dec 9, 1987Jan 17, 1989Bagcraft Corporation Of AmericaMethod of coating paper for making paper bags
US5670188 *Dec 19, 1994Sep 23, 1997Eastman Kodak CompanyApparatus for single-sided, cold mechanical knurling
US5961434 *Jul 26, 1996Oct 5, 1999Twist-Ease, Inc.Method and apparatus for arranging twist-ties
US6217500May 27, 1999Apr 17, 2001Twist-Ease, Inc.Method and apparatus for dispensing twist-ties
EP0718088A2 *Dec 5, 1995Jun 26, 1996Eastman Kodak CompanySingle-sided, cold mechanical knurling
Classifications
U.S. Classification493/332, 118/206, 24/17.00R, 118/41, 118/235, 493/962, 427/285, 118/419, 427/289, 493/369, 118/32, 24/DIG.110, 118/44, 118/249, 118/407, 118/259, 118/411
International ClassificationB29C47/02, B31F7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB29C47/026, B31F7/006, Y10S24/11, Y10S493/962
European ClassificationB29C47/02C2, B31F7/00D