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Publication numberUS2145029 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 24, 1939
Filing dateJan 30, 1936
Priority dateJan 30, 1936
Publication numberUS 2145029 A, US 2145029A, US-A-2145029, US2145029 A, US2145029A
InventorsMoseley James T W
Original AssigneeMoseley James T W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carburetor
US 2145029 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 24, 1939. .1. T w. MOSELEY CARBURETOR Filed Jan. 30, 1936 2 ShBets-Sheet 1 JAMES T. MOSELEY INVENTOR.

A TTORNEY.

Jan. 24, 1939. J; T, w. MOSELEY GARBURETOR 2 Sheets-Sheet Filed Jan. 30', 1936 JAMES T. MOSELEY 1 NVEN TOR.

BE M 4M A TTORNE Y.

Patented Jan. 24,1939

James T. W. Moseley, Webster Groves, Mo. Application January 80, 1936, Serial No. 51,474 10 claims. 133-423) This invention relates to carburetors for internal combustion engines and consists in novel means for applying heat to restricted portions of the carburetor, particularly adjacent 4 the idle ports and throttle valve.

It has been found that when internal combustion engines are operated in cold weather, frost and ice frequently form on and around the carburetor idle ports and throttle valve, resulting in operating difficulties. This is due to the vaporization of the fuel and the expansion of air as it passes the throttle restriction, and may occur before the engine becomes fully heated after starting. Thermal insulators inserted between the carburetor and adjacent parts of the engine to minimize percolation and other difflculties caused by excessive heat, obviously gravate the above-described condition with respect to formation of snow and ice during idling before the 50 engine has become hot.

One object of the present invention is to provide means for counteracting the above-mentioned cooling eifect.

Another object is to provide a device for the g5 local application of heat to the carburetor at a point adjacent the idle port.

A further object of the invention is to provide a device of the above described character having means for cutting off the supply of best when 3 thetemperatureishighsoastoavoidtheaggravationof the difficulties which are caused by excess heating of the carburetor.

A further object of my invention is to provide an electrically operated heating device of the above described character.

A further object of this invention is to provide a simple and inexpensive construction by which heat maybe conducted from the exhaust manifold to that portion of the carburetor in the vicinity of the idle discharge portsl Other objects and advantages will appear upon reference to the following specification and drawings. Referring to the drawings:

lligin'e 1 is a diagrammatic sectional view of a carburetor attached to a portion of an intake manifold, and embodying one form of my invention.

Figure 2 is a sectional view taken on line 2-2 of Figure 1.

50 Figure 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3-] of Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a diagrammatic sectional view of a carburetor embodying a second form of my invention.

as mgureiiisapartiaiviewoftheformini igure V the intake manifold 25 for the purpose of heating 4 but showing the other side of the carburetor.

Referring to Figure 1 the reference numeral l indicates the main body of the carburetor a flange I being provided at the lower end thereof for attachment to the intake manifold. The 5 carburetor comprises an air inlet I, mixture chamber 4, venturis I, and mixture outlet 6 communicating with the intake riser 25 whereby the riser forms part of the carbureted mixture passage. The air inlet is controlled by a choker valve I mounted for rotation with pivotal shaft 8 and may be operated manually or automatically in any suitable manner. The outlet is controlled by throttle valve rigidly mounted on Pivotal shaft ll.

Fuel is supplied to the carburetor through intake II and is maintained at a constant level in the chamber i2, substantially as shown, by float II and needle valve II. For normal and high speed operation, fuel is supplied to the mixture chamber through calibrated orifice ii and passage i6 and is discharged by nomie II. For low speed operation, fuel is supplied through the calibrated oriflce l8 and idle II, II, and 2! and is discharged adjacent the throttle valve through ports 22 and 23.

The specific constructional fuel 1 air bleeds, and ports for supplying low speedoridlingmixturesformsnopartofthls invention, and any suitable arrangement may be used for this purpose.

Aflangeflisprovidedattheirpperend ofriser portion 2! ed the intake manifold for attachment ofthecarburetorasbymeans of studs 28 and nuts 21. A heat insulating spacer I8 is inserted betweentheflangesonthecarburetorandintake manifold to prevent the rapid transfer of heat to the carburetor in such quantities as would ca percolation and other difiiculties.

stove or "hot spot 29 encloses a portion of itwlth exhaust gas which may enter at 30 and pass out of an opening II (shown dotted) behind the intake manifold. It will be understood that the heat supply to this stove may be cut oif by automatic means when the temperature is above normal. The means for controlling the heat supply may be of the type shown inBicknell application Serial No. 584,660, flied January 4. 1932.

In order to apply small amounts of heat to the idle port in suflicient quantities for the purpose described without supplying so much heat as to cause the whole carburetor to be over-heated, I provide vertical passages 32 and 83 extending upward from the lower end of the carburetor and so connected at their upper ends by cross passage 34 to form an inverted U passage. The lower ends of passages 32 and 33 are provided with pilot tubes 35 positioned with their flared openings facing in opposite directions so as to induce the flow of exhaust gas through these passages in the manner indicated by the arrows.

In operation, upon starting a cold engine under low temperature conditions, exhaust gas enters the hot spot" and a portion passes through the passages 32, 33 and 34 thereby immediately applying heat to that portion of the carburetor in the vicinity of the idle ports and throttle valve, thus preventing the formation of frost and ice at these points.

when the temperature is excessive the application of exhaust heat to the hot spot 29 may be cut oil as. for instance, by the automatic means described in the above mentioned co-pending application so that the operation of the idle port heating device is discontinued when it is not required.

A modification of my invention is shown in Figures 4 and of the drawings in which a hermetically sealed resistance coil 36 is applied adjacent the idle port 22 for the purpose of heating the adjacent parts 01 the carburetor. Current for heating this coil is supplied by the storage battery 31, one terminal of which is connected to the coil by means of conduit 38. The coil is also connected by conduit 39 to switch member 40 which slidably contacts rotor 4| attached to choker shaft 8. Shaft 8 is electrically connected with the other battery terminal through the body of the carburetor and conduit 42. The battery, switch and coil may be electrically connected by other means, if desired. Lead 38 also breaks through a manual switch 45, which may be the usual ignition switch, so that the application of heat will be cut oil when the engine is not in operation.

A current insulating inlay sector 43 is provided in the rotor for the purpose of breaking the circult when the choke valve is in an open or nearly open position.

The end of choke shaft 8 opposite the switch members 4|] and 4! extends into a chamber 46 housing a thermostatic coil 41 which is operatively connected to shaft 8 so as to yieldingly resist opening of the choke valve when the temperature is relatively low and to move the valve to the open condition responsive to the heated condition of the engine.

In operation, upon starting a cold engine in cold weather, the choke valve will be moved to a closed position, and the ignition switch will be closed, thereby connecting the battery and heating coil whereupon the coil will radiate heat in the vicinity of the idle discharge ports and the edge of the throttle valve adjacent the ports, thus preventing the formation of frost and ice.

As the engine warms up the choke valve is gradually moved toward its open position by the thermostat and when the choke is fully opened switch member 40 engages insulating sector 43 breaking the circuit to the resistance coil. At this time the engine heat at the lower end of the carburetor will be sufiicient to prevent further frosting adjacent the throttle and fuel nozzles.

In addition to preventing the formation of ice around the idle port, the electrically heated device shown in Figures 4 and 5 serves as a tumor and substantially assists vaporization and starting under low temperature conditions.

The devices illustrated are susceptible of various modifications without departing from the spirit of the invention and the exclusive use is contemplated of all such modifications as come within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In an internal combustion engine, structure forming a fuel mixture chamber, a fuel passage having an opening into said chamber, means for heating a restricted portion only of said structure adjacent said opening to counteract the cooling effect due to vaporization of fuel in said opening, and means for avoiding the effeet of said heating means when the engine becomes heated.

2. In an internal combustion engine, structure forming a fuel mixture chamber, a liquid fuel chamber having an opening into said mixture chamber, means for confining a body of fluid matter exposed to the engine heat, and means for conducting said fluid matter to a portion of said structure adjacent said opening for heating said portion, the heated fluid in said conducting means affecting a restricted portion only adjacent said opening.

3. In an internal combustion engine, carburetor structure including a mixture chamber, a liquid fuel chamber, and an idling fuel passage connecting said chambers, said passage having an opening in-the wall of said mixture chamber, heating means, and a conduit leading from said means to a portion of said structure adjacent said opening for heating the same and then leading back to said means.

4. In a carburetor, structure forming a fuel mixture chamber, a liquid fuel chamber having an opening into said mixture chamber, means for heating said structure adjacent said opening, and means responsive to the heated condition of the engine for avoiding the effect of said heating means.

5. In a carburetor, structure forming a mixture chamber, a choke valve therein, a fuel passage having an opening into said mixture chamber, an electrical unit for heating said structure immediately adjacent said opening, and a switch operated by said valve for controlling said unit; in which said switch comprises contact members, one of said members being rotatable with said valve and having an electrical conducting part and an insulating part, and the other member being formed of an electrical conductor, said switch being closed when said second-mentioned member is in engagement with the conducting part of said first-mentioned member, and open when said second mentioned member is in engagement with the insulating part of said first-mentioned member.

6. In a carburetor, structure forming a mixture conduit, a throttle valve therein. an idling port in the wall of said conduit adjacent said valve, means for heating a portion of said conduit spaced from said valve for improving vaporization in said conduit, and individual means for heating a restricted portion only of said structure immediately adjacent said port for counteracting the cooling eflect due to vaporization of fuel in said pot and adiacent said valve.

'7. In a carburetor, structure forming a fuel mixture conduit, a liquid fuel chamber having an opening into said conduit, means for heating a portion of said conduit spaced from said opening for improving vaporization in said conduit, and an electrical heating unit immediately adjacent said opening for heating said structure.

8. In a plain tube carburetor, means forming a mixing conduit, a venturi in said conduit, a main fuel nozzle discharging in said venturi, a throttle valve, an idle passage discharging into said mixing conduit at the edge of said throttle valve and a heating device for applying heat to said idle discharge passage without substantially heating the fuel supply from the main nozzle.

9. In a plain tube carburetor, means forming a mixing conduit, a main fuel discharge nozzle discharging into said mixing conduit, an idle passage for discharging idling fuel into said mixin: conduit and means for raising the temperature of the idling fuel to a degree substantially higher than the temperature prevailing in the mixing conduit generally.,

10. In a device of the class described, a mixing conduit, :3. main fuel nozzle discharging into said mixing conduit, an idling fuel passage discharging into said mixing conduit, a device for heating said idling fuel passage and additional means posterior to the discharge outlet of said idling fuel passage for applying heat to said mixing conduit.

JAMES T. W. MOSELEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2478294 *Oct 22, 1945Aug 9, 1949Tage MadsenPistons for combustion, steam, and other engines
US2603199 *Jan 23, 1950Jul 15, 1952 Carburetor deicer
US2766974 *Apr 2, 1954Oct 16, 1956Acf Ind IncDe-icing means for carburetors
US2793633 *May 24, 1952May 28, 1957Ben Heftler MauriceCarburetors
US2986378 *Jan 31, 1958May 30, 1961Holley Carburetor CoCarburetor fuel nozzle
US5078115 *Nov 9, 1990Jan 7, 1992Texas Instruments IncorporatedHeating device
DE1058311B *Aug 16, 1956May 27, 1959Maurice Ben HeftlerVergaser
DE1058788B *Jun 11, 1956Jun 4, 1959SibeVergaser fuer Verbrennungsmotore
DE1227283B *Oct 5, 1962Oct 20, 1966Donald L WhitmoreHeizvorrichtung fuer Leerlaufduesennadel eines Vergasers fuer Brennkraftmaschinen
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/545, 261/1, 123/552, 261/142, 123/549, 261/41.5
International ClassificationF02M15/00, F02M15/02
Cooperative ClassificationF02M15/02
European ClassificationF02M15/02