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Publication numberUS2146664 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 7, 1939
Filing dateApr 18, 1938
Priority dateApr 18, 1938
Publication numberUS 2146664 A, US 2146664A, US-A-2146664, US2146664 A, US2146664A
InventorsWolff Theodor
Original AssigneeWolff Theodor
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cloth and a method of producing the same
US 2146664 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 7, 1939. T. WOLFF 2,146,664

CLOTH AND A METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME Filed April 18, 1938 &

772eo dor Wo/ff Patented Feb. 7,v 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT. OFFICE CLOTH AND A METHOD OF PRODUCIN G THE SAME This inventionrelates to a new type of cloth, more particularly for the manufacture of men's and boys suits, and to a method of producing the same.

In a suit of clothes, which for the purpose of the description will be considered to comprise three parts, viz., the jacket, the waistcoat and the trousers, although the waistcoat itself is not an essential part of this combination, the disadvantage. arises that the trousers, after a certain I period of use, will exhibit considerable signs oi wear, whilst the jacket and the waistcoat are still in a comparatively good condition, so that it is necessary eitherto discard the entire-suit or to purchase an additional pair of trousers to wear with the jacket and the waistcoat. In the majority of cases, however, the same material and the same pattern will not be obtainable, so that new trousers ,of a different pattern and pos- Zn sibly also a different material will require to take the place of the worn pair. In this way the suit will considerably lose in appearance.

It is the object of the invention to overcome this drawback and to provide a new type of cloth for the manufactureof men's and boys suits,

upon the use of which it' can reasonably be expected that the' trousers will endure, without deterioration in appearance, equally as long as the 'jacket or the waistcoat.

" A further object of the invention is to provide a new type of cloth for men's and boys suits which, when made from this cloth, will not differ in appearance from a suit of clothes made from a normal material.

In the manufacture of suitings itis usual for the weaver to produce a certain minimum length, say 360 yards, of each pattern or design, as although it would of course be possible in itself to produce any design in even the shortest length 40 it will be obvious that a certain minimum length is necessary to enable the material to be sold at a reasonable price.

In the reduction of the invention to practice each design is" made up of twodifierent kinds of cloth, the one cloth being intended for.-the

subsequent production of the jacket and waistcoat and the other for the trousers. The former is woven from threads 01' equal ply constituting both the warp as well as the weft, for example 50 two-cordor two-ply threads. The second cloth, however, is made up of a material having the same set of warp threads as the first piece of I cloth, but in which the'weit threads consist of a greater number of plies than the warp threads.

55 Thus, for example, the warp and weft threads,

of the first cloth may be two-cord or'two-ply threads, whilst in the second cloth the warp threads are two-cord or two-ply and theweft threads three-cord or three-plyth'reads. The

second cloth, whilst not difiering in appearance, '5 will be considerably stronger than the first'cloth, and will be well adapted to withstand the additional wear imposed onthe-trousers of a. mans or boy's suit.

In order to preserve the appearance of the cloth 10 and to ensure that the two'cloths making up the one design will not differ in appearance it is necessary to select finer cords or plies for the thread of greater ply, so that the latter, despite the greater number of cords, will not be apprel5 ciably thicker than thethreads of lesserply.

In the ordinary way greater length of material will be required for the jacket and. waistcoat together than for the trousers, so that it the completelength of any particular pattern produced amounts to 360 yards, approximately 210 yards will be made upof threads which are equal in .the weft and the warp, whilst the remaining 150 yards will .comprise the second cloth in which the weft threads consist of an increased number of cords or plies.

Preferably, therefore, the two different cloths will be in one continuous length, and the second cloth will follow immediately on the first cloth without a break, although if desired the two difierent cloths making up the one design can also be produced separately, in which connection the length of each may be increased in corresponding "proportion.

'jected to acertainfinishing process before it is placed on the market. If the yarn has not been dyed previously, the cloth proceeding from the loom is first treated in a bath to remove the size or glue employed in weaving for better holding 40 the threads together, isthen dyed, squeezed, rinsed in water, thereupon dried and stretched, and finally atter renewed moistening is pressed. and ironed on a calenderj Ii previously dyed yarn is employed the treatment is substantially the same with. omission of the dyeing process. There may of course be certain modifications in this treatment dependent on the nature of the material. Whether, however,. the two cloths comprising the one design in accordance with the invention be produced in one piece or in separate lengths it is essential that. they should be subjected to the said finishing treatment in one operation. It will be appreciated that in treating cloth in the manner'described the sliflhtest variation in the treatment would be quite sumcient to impart an entirely different appearance to two lengths of cloth treated separately. Thus for example it is extremely difficult in the dyeing process alone to obtain a colour exactly corresponding to a previous shade employed, whilst variations in the washing or calendering process will also produce entirely diiferent results.

In consequence,.if the cloth destined for the jacket and the waistcoat and that for the trousers were subjected to separate finishing treatments, they would in all probability exhibit considerable diilerences in appearance despite the fact that no difference in itself is in any way apparent from the use of difl'erent yarns.

The invention, therefore, covers not only the production of cloth of any particular design in the form of two distinct cloths, in which the weft threads of the one cloth diifer from the weft threads of the other -cloth, but also the step which consists in subjecting the two cloths thus produced to a common finishing treatment.

. If the two cloths are produced in one'single length, they will preferably be passed as such through the treatment apparatus, or it they are produced separately, they may be connected together at the ends to pass through the apparatus as a continuous web.

The invention is illustrated by way of example in the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. 1 illustrates a piece of cloth, in which the warp and weft threads are of equal ply.

Fig. 2 illustrates a piece of cloth, in which the weft threads comprise a larger number or plies than the warp threads.

Fig. 3 illustrates diagrammatically a finishing apparatus for the treatment of the cloth following the weaving process.

. In Fig. 1 the warp threads I and the weft threads 2'are two-cord threads. This cloth is" used for producing. the jacket and the waistcoat of a mans or boys suit. In Fig. 2 the warp threads la are two-cord threads and the weft threads 2a are three-cord threads. The cloth according to Fig. 2 is used for producing the trousers of a mans or boy's suit, the jacket and/or waistcoat of which are made from a cloth according to Fig. 1.

There is no limitation to two-cord and threecord threads, and the warp threads may he, say, two-cord or two-ply threads and the weft threads four-cord or four-ply threads, or thewarp threads may be three-cord or three-ply threads and the weft threads four-cord or five-cord threads, and so forth, the essential feature being that the weft threads of the cloth according to Fig. 2 possess a greater number of cords than the weft threads in Fig. 1.

The weaving itself occurs in the conventional fashion, there being used either dyed or undyed yarn. In either case a certain length of cloth is woven in accordance with Fig. 1, having equally corded threads in the warp and the weft, and then a further length in accordance with Fig. 2 in which the weft threads comprise a greater number of cords or plies. In the cloth according to Fig. 2 finer cords will be employed for the yarn of greater ply, so that after the twisting the three-cord or three-ply yarn will of cords] araaeea sign, rather more than one-half of this length,

say 210 yards, is produced in accordance with Fig. l, whereupon the weft threads are replaced by others of the same colour, but of greater ply, and weaving is continued to the end. 5

If a sufiicient length of cloth of each design is being produced, it may also be found convenient to produce separately the two cloths of which each design according to the invention is composed.

' In either case, however, the two different cloths making up the one design are subjected to a common finishing treatment, for example in an' apparatus as illustrated in Fig. 3.

.After leaving the loom the cloth is conducted 15 to a suitable bath or trough 3 for removal of the size or glue employed for the weaving process for better holding the threads together. From the bath 3 the cloth passes to the dyeing vat 4, and thence to a rinsing bath 5. Upon leaving the'bath' 5 it passes between rollers 6 for the removal of superfluous moisture, and then to a drier l and a steaming or conditioning apparatus 8. After leaving the latter it is suitably moistened at 9 and then passes to the calender l0, being finally wound on the drum II. If previously dyed yarn has been employed in weaving the cloth, the treatment is substantially the same with omission of the dyeing process.

Assuming the two appertaining cloths of the so one design have been produced in one length. the complete web of material will be passed as; such through the said apparatus. If, however, they have been produced separately, they can be connected end to end and then conveyed through 3; the apparatus, or they can also be treated simultaneously as separate lengths. Whichever method is adapted, it will be obvious that both cloths will have a completely uniform appearance throughout.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. Steps in a method of producing cloth for suits of clothes all parts of which present substantially identical design, appearance, and finish, while varying in strength, comprising weaving the cloth in a plurality of sections having the same set of warp threads throughoutsaid sections, by weaving one section with weft threads of equal ply with said warp threads, weaving another section with weft threads of a greater number of plies than said warp threads and of a' greater number of plies than the weft threads of the first mentioned section, all of said threads having substantially the same thickness or diameter, and subjecting. the sections substantially simultaneously to the same washing and finishing treatments in substantially one operation.

2. Steps in a method of producing cloth for suits of clothes all parts of which present substantially identical design, appearance, and finish, while varying in strength, comprising weaving the cloth in a single continuous length comprising a plurality of sections, and having the same set of warp threads throughout said length, by weaving one section of said continuous length with weft threads of equal ply with said warp threads, weaving another section of said continuous length with weft threads of a greater number of plies than said warp threads and of a greater number of plies than the weft threads of the first mentioned section, all of said threads having substantially the same thickness or'diameter, and subjecting the sections of said continuous length of cloth substantially simultaneously to the same 7 one operation.

. greater number of plies 3. As a new article or manufacture, cloth in a plurality of sections of substantially identical design and appearance for making suits of clothes, said cloth sections or waistcoat having weft threads of equal ply with said ,warp threads, and the other section as for making'the trousers having weft threads of 9. than said warp threads and of a greater number of plies than the weft threads of the flrst mentioned section, all of said threads having substantially the same thickness or diameter, the sections having substantially identical appearance and same washing and finishing treatments in substantially one operation.

, having the same set of warp threads, one section for making the jacket finish and having been subjected substantially simultaneously to the stantially identical design,

waistcoat having weft threads or equal ply with said warp threads, and the other section as for making thetrousers having weft threads of a greater number of plies than said warp threads and of a greater number of plies than the weft threads of the first mentioned section, all of said threads of said continuous length having substantially the same thickness or diameter, the sections of said continuous length having substan-' tially identical appearance and finish and having been subjected substantially simultaneously to the same washing and finishing treatmentsin substantially one operation.

5. As a new article of manufacture, cloth for suits of clothes all parts of which present substantially identical design, appearance, and finish, while varying in strength, made according to the method 0! claim 1.

6. As a new article of manufacture, cloth for suits of clothes all parts of which present subappearance, and flnish, while varying in strength, made according to the method of claim 2.

THEODOR WOLFE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2433270 *Apr 6, 1944Dec 23, 1947Goldman Ida YMethod of coating stitched fabric
US5556696 *Sep 23, 1994Sep 17, 1996Pinkus; Fred J.Stiffening material for headwear and the like
USD645259 *Jun 19, 2009Sep 20, 2011Dsm Ip Assets B.V.Film sheet for use in antiballistic articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/383.00R, 28/151, 28/169, 139/426.00R
International ClassificationD03D15/00
Cooperative ClassificationD10B2501/00, D10B2401/14, D03D15/00, D03D2700/0133
European ClassificationD03D15/00