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Publication numberUS2146753 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 14, 1939
Filing dateAug 17, 1938
Priority dateAug 17, 1938
Publication numberUS 2146753 A, US 2146753A, US-A-2146753, US2146753 A, US2146753A
InventorsChristopher Luckhaupt
Original AssigneeHenry J Lucke
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package for infusing material
US 2146753 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 14, 1939. c. LUCKHAUPT PACKAGE FOR INFUSING MATERIAL Filed Aug. 17, 1958.

' back into facial alignment with the remainder Fig. 8.

of the regenerated cellulose sheet;

Fig. 8 is a diagrammatic view illustrating one means for arranging the puncturings over desired areas in the regenerated cellulose sheet and for subsequently and simultaneously effecting the operation of rolling under pressure the tabs or flaps into facial alignment with the regenerated cellulose sheet; and

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary view in section of a container having steeping water therein and showing one of my improved packages in position therein.

Referring to the drawing and particularly Figs. 1 and 2, l0 designates a package or sack made from regenerated cellulose and which may be in the form either transparent or translucent and whichpackage or sack is filled with infusing material ll. Such material may be any desired, such astea or coffee, and from which an infusion is to be made by steeping in preferably hot water.

The package or sack III is made from regenerated cellulose in sheet form, such as the sheet illustrated in Fig. 3, and designated by the reference numeral l2. The sheet of material I2 is mechanically provided with puncturings l8, preferably arranged in groups and in any desired pattern and over designated areas of the sheet l2.

The puncturings, designated l3, are illustrated in Figs. 4 to 7, inclusive, and are preferably made. by a mechanical device such as is illustrated in The puncturings l3 may have any form desired, such as a curved form, illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4, to and including what may be termed practically substantially rectilinear slits. In making the puncturings II, a cylinder l4, rotatably mounted on a shaft I5, is provided on its surface with punch members l6 of the shape I! of the puncturings desired to be made and which cooperates with an anvil ll rotatably mounted on a shaft l8 parallel to the shaft IS. The cylinder I4 and anvil I! run at the same peripheral speed, being constrained to do so by the intermeshing gears l9, mounted respectively on the shafts ISand i1 and such gears, as well as the cylinder l4 and anvil H, are of substantially the same diameter. The sheet H- of regenerated cellulose is passed through the space between the cylinder I4 and anvil IT in the direction of the arrow shown in Fig. 8 and as a result, the tabs of the puncturings l3 are forced outwardly from one side of thesheet l2 as shown in Figs. 5 and 6. The sheet of regenerated cellulose l2, moving in the direction of the arrow shown in Fig. 8, brings the same into engagement with the parallelly arranged calendar rolls 2| rotat-- able each in the direction of the arrow shown. and which forces the flaps 20 back into the space from which they came and into substantial facial alignment with the faces of the regenera sheet l2. The sheet therefore has the appearance, after passing through the calendar rolls 2|, as shown in Fig. 7, where the puncturings l3 can be faintly discerned.

The flaps 20 are so arranged on the sheet of regenerated cellulose l2 and the sheet i2 is so manipulated during the making of the package or sack in, that the flaps or tabs20 will be forced to curl up and extend into the interior of the bag or sack III. This is clearly illustrated in Fig. 9, where the bag or sack ID with the infusing material I l therein, and being subjected to the action of the infusing water 22 held in the container 23, curls up under the action of the infusing water, and is forced away from facial alignment with the sheet of material l2, into the inside of the bag or sack It. The inward curling of the flaps or tabs 20 tends to prevent passage outward of the fine tea leaves into the infusing liquid 22.

The bag or sack ill illustrated in Fig. 1 is made from the sheet I2 of regenerated cellulose by cutting from such sheet the material between the upper edge thereof and the lower edge and the two vertical lines designated by the reference numeral 24 in Fig. 3. This material with the groups of punctures I2, arranged as shown, is folded on the line 25 so as to bring ,the upper and lower edges into substantial alignment with each other, and a line of stitching started preferably at the point 28 on the line 25 is brought parallel to one of the lines 24, thence substantially parallel to the upper edge of the sheet, and then parallel to the other line 24, terminating again at the line 25. The line of stitching is designated by the reference numeral 21 in Figs. 1 and 2, and the sewing material at the termination of the line 21 is extended into a loop 28 and tied at its outer end to a designating tab 29.

Before the last portion of the line of stitching 21 is completed,'the bag or sack I is filled with the charge of infusing material H, as shown in Fig. 12, and the completion of the last portion of the line of stitching 21 permanently closes such infusing material within the bag or sack ID.

The designating tab 29 is preferably made from a sheet of regenerated cellulose and comprises a length of material substantially greater than the width of the bag l0, provided with parallel slits 30 to define a central portion II and side portions 32. This tab 29 is slipped onto the bag or sack N by having a central portion 2| arranged on one side of the sack and the side portions 32 arranged on the other side. Such tab is also useful in the utilization of the package as it forms a convenient handle for putting the bag I ll into or taking the same out of the infusing water 22.

Whereas I have described my invention by reference to specific forms thereof, it will be understood that many changes and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention.

I claim: 1

1. An improved package for infusing material, said package being made from regenerated cellulose in sheet form provided with puncturings in desired group arrangement and size on designated areas of-the material, the tabs resulting from the stated puncturings being normally disposed insubstantial facial alignment with the sheet, the punctured tabs being amenable to the action of infusing liquid, whereby said tabs curl to permit access of infusing liquid to the contents of the package.

2. An improved package for infusing material made from a sheet of regenerated c'ellulose material, the package being in sack form and the material thereof provided with puncturings arranged in any desired grouping and size in the sheet of material, the tabs resulting from the stated puncturings being normally disposed in substantial facial alignment with the sheet of material and biased to open the puncturings by withdrawal of the tabs from the puncturings and into the interior of the package under action of infusing fluid. 3. An improved package for infusing material made from a sheet of regenerated cellulose material in sack form such material having greater tensile strength in one direction than in the other, said sheet material being provided with puncturings arranged in any desired group formation, the length of such puncturings lying along the linesof greatest tensile strength of the material, the-tabs resulting from the stated puncturings being normally disposed in substantial facial alignment with the sheet of material and said tabs normally biased to curl or retreat from thesheet of the material upon exposure to in-' fusing liquid and to retreat into the interior of the package to thereby open the puncturings.

4. An improved package for infusing material made from 'a sheet of regenerated cellulose material in sack form such material having greater tensile strength in one direction than in' the other, said sheet material being provided with puncturings arranged in any desired group formation, the length of such puncturings lying along the lines of greatest tensile strength of the materiairthe tabs resulting from the stated puncturings being normally disposed in substantial facial alignment with the sheet of material and said tabs normally biased to curl or ,retreat from the sheet of the material upon exposure to infusing liquid and to retreat into the interior of the package to thereby open the puncturings, and with the package closed by sewings of fibrous material and with the ends of fibrous material v extending beyond the package and a tag attached to said ends.

CHRISTOPHER LUCKHAUPT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3053665 *Aug 23, 1957Sep 11, 1962Nat Tea Packing Company IncManufacture of infusion bags
US3085608 *Jun 25, 1959Apr 16, 1963Gen Motors CorpBag of permeable plastic material
US5135764 *Jul 6, 1987Aug 4, 1992Kraft General Foods, Inc.Coffee bag brewing by microwave
US5880441 *Nov 12, 1997Mar 9, 1999National Presto Industries, Inc.Microwave beverage maker apparatus and method
US5942143 *Nov 12, 1997Aug 24, 1999National Presto Industries, Inc.Microwave beverage maker apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification426/77, 53/413, 493/186
International ClassificationB65D81/00, B65D85/804, B65D85/808
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/808
European ClassificationB65D85/808