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Publication numberUS2146809 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 14, 1939
Filing dateMay 17, 1937
Priority dateMay 17, 1937
Publication numberUS 2146809 A, US 2146809A, US-A-2146809, US2146809 A, US2146809A
InventorsGeorge C Flint
Original AssigneeVapo Systems Equipment Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vaporizer
US 2146809 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 14, 1939. I G; c. FLINT 2,146,809

' l vAPoRIzEn' Filed" May 17, 1937 3 Sheets-Sheet `1 Feb. 14, 1939. G'. c, FLINT 2,145,809

VAPORIZER Filed May 17,- 1937 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Feb. 14, 1939. G. C. FUNT y 2,146,809

VAPORIZER Filed May-17, 1957y I s sheets-sheet 5 Patented Feb. 14, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ananas 'Y l varomzan' Application May 17, 1937, Serial No. 142,989

-7 claims.. c1. :a1-44) My invention relates to improvements in vaporizers and similar devices. y

My invention relates more particularly to vaporizers of the type adapted to be employed in the vicinity of a roll of paper or similar material.

It is a weil-known characteristic of paper, cloth, and other flexible materials, that are supplied in rolls, that when the same is being unrolled, and especially a-t a' high rate of speed, there is a tendency due to'static electricity of the adjoining surfaces, of the paper to adhere together, thereby requiring of necessity slower movement iol the paper or other material from the roll. It is also a. well-known fact that the application of an exceedingly ne spray of vapor or mist at the point of contact breaking will tend to break the static electricity which holds the adjoining surfaces together and thus permit the paper to be unrolled at a greater rate of speed.

Accordingly, the principal object of my inven tion is to provide improved mechanism for producing a vapor, mist or an exceedingly ne spray and discharging the same into a space directly at the point where paper, cloth or other material is 245v being taken from a roll, thereby wetting bothsides of the material simultaneously.

A further object of the present invention is to provide means of the type described capable of movement governed by the size of the roll, to

cause the spray to be directed at the exact point of separation upon any desired size of roll.

A further object of the present invention is'to provide improved means of the type described that will simultaneously project a spray or vapor I at the point of separation of material from the roll and also upon the outer edge thereof.

A further object is to provide means for automatically changing the direction in 'which the spray is directed to conform to the size of the roll, whereby both surfaces of the entire roll of paper are subjected to the spray. A

A further. object is to provide improved means cooperating with the roll for securing the aforementioned adjustment.

A further object is to provide mechanism oi' the type described that is comparatively simple in construction, yet highly eilicient and capable of long and useful service without becoming broken or out of order.

Other objects and advantages will be more apparent from the following description, wherein reference is had to the accompanying three sheets of drawings, upon which Fig. 1 1s a front elevational view oi a standard supporting a rollof paper or other material to which my improved mechanism has been attached:

Fig. 2 is a lei't side elevational view thereof; Fig. 3 is a sectional view on the same plane as ,Fig. 2 and is taken generally on the lines 3-3 5 of Fig. 1; :j l l Fig..4 is a similar sectionall view showing the location of all of the parts after the roll has been reduced in a substantial degree,

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary elevational view of the 1o roll support and my improved mechanism taken generally upon the right side of the machine as shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 6 is a longitudinal vertical section oi' the vaporizer mixer mechanism employed, taken gen- 15 erally on the line 6--6 of Fig. 7; and

` Fig. 7 is a transverse sectional view through the same mechanism, taken generally on the line I-l of Fig. 6.

In the embodiment of my mechanism which I 20 have shown on the drawings, I provide generally the upright standards I0 and I2 mounted upon suitable base members I4 and I6 positioned upon the iioor. 'Ihe standards I 2 and I 0 may be formed with the horizontally extended bearing members 25 I8 and 20 adapted to support the rod member 22 upon which a roll R of paper or other material may be mounted. For running oil the paper, as for example into a printing press, in a horizontal plane, the same may be trained over suitable roll- 30 ers 24 and 26 mounted upon the shaft members 28 and 30 that are'journalled in the standards I2 and I0. Directly above the bearing members I8 and 20 I provide a pair of brackets 32 and 34. The bracket member 34 may support a vaporizer mixer 35 mechanism 36 which I employ in connection with this invention. This mechanism may be of the general type shown and described in my copending application, Serial No. 43,008, iiled October 1, 1935. This mechanism, briey, is a mechanism 40 whereby air and water are mixed in suitable quantities so that throughsuitable nozzle members a very fine spray or vapor may be produced and discharged under pressure.

Accordingly, and to carry the present invention, I extend the horizontally disposed pipe member 38 across the width of the roll R and mount the opposite end in suitable U-members I0 upon the bracket 32. I provide a plurality of nozzle members 4t2-'connected 50 as disclosed in the aforementionednvntion to the mixer mechanism 36. I also provide a pair of nozzle members 44 horizontally disposed adjacent the edges of the roll R and secured to the pipe 38 by a suitable connector I6. A pair out the purpose of 411` 2 of follower rollers 48 are adapted to lie against the side of the roll R and are connected by the arm members 58 to clamps 52 to secure them to the pipe member 38. A pair of brackets 54 are provided clamped upon the pipe members 46 and formed with the forked end 55 to engage the rod members 58, thus connecting together for rotary movement the nozzles 44 and the rollers 48. I also provide a coiled spring member 56 secured to the mechanism 36 at one end and secured to the pipe 38 at the other. The spring maybe under compression so that it is at all times tending to rotate the pipe member 38 in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Figs. 2, 3 and 4.

As heretofore mentioned, it is desirable to direct an exceedingly ne spray or mist into the crevice that is formed at the point where the sheet* of paper is leaving the roll, thus destroying the static electricity which tends to adhere the paper together and prevent'the free and easy movement of the same from the roll. By thus directing a mist or spray, this condition is destroyed with` the result that the paper may be unrolled with a far greater rate of speed than heretofore -possible. The purpose of providing the horizontal nozzles 44 directed at the edge of the roll, isto assist in this action by providing a mist or spray .along the exterior edgeof the outer layer and its adjoining layers.

The connection between the vaporizer mixer mechanism 86 and the nozzles 42 and 44 may be generally accomplished by a plurality of. individual pipelines 18 and 18a which the nozzles 42 and 44 and supply to these nozzles air under pressure and a combination of vapor, and a mist or spray of liquid.

The mixer mechanism 86 may comprise generally a housing 12 provided with a plurality of lateral passages or mixing chambers 14 to which the several conduits 18 and 18a are connected. The housing 12 may be provided with a plurality of lateral ducts or openings 16, 18 and 88, the conduits 18 being attached to each of the openings 16 by suitable connections 82, and the passageway 18 being attached by a similar connection 84 to a vapor pipe 86 extending into theA upper portion 12a of the housing 12, while the passageway 88 is attached by a somewhat similar connection 88 to a tubular member 98 which extends upwardly through the cover plate 82 of the housing 12. The lower end of the members 88 are screw-threaded, as shown at 94, within the member 88, and the lower end of the member extends downward through the conduit 88 so that the lower end projectsslightly into the lateral passage or mixing chamber 14 and is there formed to serve as a valve seat.

Suitable means, as for example the openings 8|, are provided in the Wall of the tubular member 98 to permit fluid in the housing 12 to enter the member and escape freely through the member 98 into the mixing chamber 14. The spaceA between the lower end of the connection 88 and the bottom of the opening into which the same is secured, is shown provided with suitable packing material 86 surrounding the tubular member 98 so that the fluid in the housing will not escape into the passage past the lower end of the member 98.

In the form shown, a pair of needle valves 98 and |88 are provided adapted to cooperate with the passageways 18 and the lower end of the member 98 respectively to control the passage through the vapor lpipe 86 and the tubular memconnect with the lower end of f vespecially true where ber 88 and by theird/aiiustment determine the amount of liquid an vapor drawn into the mixb/y the suction of the pipe-18a the opening 16 ing chamber 14 and thence charged through to the pipe/18 and to the nozzles.

ny suitable means may be provided for controlling/ the supply of air to the airl pipes 18a. As shown, vI provide a longitudinal passageway |82 in the housing 12 connected by a suitable pipe |84 with a source of air under pressure.

A plurality of tubes/lafo'ne for each nozzle 42 or 44, communicate'with the chamber |82 through the port |86. A needle valve |88 for each pipe 18a is provided to control the opening between the passage |86 and the chamber |82, thus controlling the amount of air passing to each individual nozzle.

In the preferred construction of the vaporizer mixer mechanism shown, I provide a float valve ||8 directly connected to control the liquid supply through the pipeline ||2 which communicates with housing 12. I also provide suitable means in the form of an electrically operated thermostat ||4 and the electric heater |I6 for maintaining the fluid in the housing at a constant temperature. Both of these elements may be of well known construction, the thermostat being preferably located at the upper level of the fluid in the housing, and the heating element connected thereto so that the electric current to the heating element will always be controlled by the thermostat and thus maintain the uid in the housing at the desired temperature.'

With the construction, as pointed out, it will be obvious that the device is provided with the necessary air and liquid supply and connected to a suitable source of electrical energy so that with the needle valves controlling the flow of fluid through the pipes 18 and 18a, and which can be adjusted to secure the desired density as well .as velocity of the vapor as it issues from the jets 42 and 44, it is obvious that the density of the fluid or spray and each one of the jets is independently controllable. It is further obvious that the temperature of the liquid in the housing may be emplyed to provide a vaporin the upper portion 12a of the housing as dense or as attenuated as may be desired, from a very Wet steam down to a-very slight or almost imperceptible humidity, and that when such vapor is mixed with a positively controlled volume of fluid under the mixing chamber 14 through the pipe 88, the resultant vapor may be as dense or as attenuated as may be desired.

It is obvious that when the device is suitably adjusted changes in atmospheric humidity will tend to require changes in the volume of vapor discharged from the several nozzles. This is material is being prepared for some special process, such as, for example, charging cloth with a glazing or stiffening material, or when'moistening paper to receive printed impressions or the like', and in such cases the changes in atmospheric' humidity render it desirable to adjust the volume of vapor being supplied to the moving web.v

Suitable mechanism forl making a uniform change in all of the .jets may include the bell cranks |28 connected to the upper ends of the pipes to all of the bell cranks. This lever may, of course, be moved either manually or in any desired manner if connected to the mechanism.

-By reason of the coiled spring member 66 and 98, and the operating lever |22 connected' is automatically controllable obvious that as the size of the roll diminishes the pipe member 38 will be rotated in a counterclockwise direction, at all times holding the center of the nozzles 42 directed to the'center of the crevice formed by the outer layer of paper leaving th'e roll. 'I'his action is accomplished by reason of the rollers llVwhich bear against the roll andas the roll diminishes in size the spring member 56 is permitted to rotate the pipe 38, thus moving allff the nozzles and automatically keeping them centered upon the edge and the outer layer of paper.

By directing the spray or mist into the crevice that is formed at the point where the sheet o f paper leaves the roll, it will be obvious that both sides of the paper are being moistened simultaneously and to-the same degree. This action has a very beneicial advantage in the use of paper for printing, in that it is a well known fact that moistened paper will take thinner inks and the same will' adhere much more readily. 'I'hus it can be seen that a saving in ink is'also eiected as Well as an increase in the speed with which the paper can be used.

Another very effective result of applying a spray or mist to the sheet 'of paper as it leaves the roll is to prevent the production of paper dust, which is well known to those skilled in the art, as a very detrimental factorto speed of operation and cleanliness in a paper printing plant. 'I'he provision of a spray eiectively eliminates all possibility of paper dust with the result that it is not necessary to shut down the paper handling machinery at any time during the day to remove the dust which ordinarily gathers without the use oi my improved vaporizer.

While I have described this invention in connection with the speciilc type of mechanism for providing the kind of spray desired as shown in the4 heretofore mentioned application, it will be obvious that other means may be employed to provide the desired kind of spray or mist.

While I have illustrated a specic embodiment of the invention, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made in the exact details shown and I do not wish to limit myself in any particular.

Rather, what I desire to secure and protect by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. In apparatus for moistening a continuous sheet of paper on a roll by directing a vapor into the crevice formedwhere the sheet is leaving the roll and against the opposite edges of the roll at a point adjacent the unrolling of the sheet therefrom, `the combination of a mixingchamber, a pipe line extending horizontally therefrom and parallel to a horizontally mounted roll of paper, a plurality of nozzles secured in the side of said pipe and directed toward the crevice, a pair of angularly disposed extensions on said pipe, a nozzle on each of said extensions dis.

posed parallel'to said pipe and directed upon opposite sides thereof toward a point adjacent the periphery of the roll of paper at the point of the unrolling of the sheet therefrom, all of said nozzles connected to said mixing chamber and vmeans for rotating said pipe in accordance with the size of the roll of paper which is being moistened.

2. In apparatus for moistening a continuous sheet of paper on a roll by directing a vapor into the crevice formed where the sheet is leaving the roll' andagainst the opposite edges 'of the roll at a point. adjacent the unrolling of the from said mixing chamber and parallel to` a horizontally mounted roll of paper, av plurality of nozzles secured in the side of said pipe and directed toward the crevice, a pair of 'angularly disposed lextensions on said pipe, a nozzle on each of said extensions disposed parallel to said pipe and directed upon opposite sides thereof toward a point adjacent the periphery of the roll oi' paper at the point of the unrolling of the sheet therefrom, all of said nozzles connected to said mixing chamber and means for rotating said pipe in accordance with the size of the roll of paper which is being moistened, said means including a loaded spring connected to said pipe and roller means'controlled by said spring 'and bearing against the outer surface of said' roll of paper.

3. In apparatus for moistening a continuous sheet of material by directing a continuous supply of vapor into the crevice formed where the sheet is leaving the roll, the combination of a pair of vertical standards, means for supporting a roll of material in a horizontal position there# between, a pair of brackets above said means, a mixing chamber and a horizontal pipe disposed upon said brackets, means for rotating said'pipe, means for controlling the rotation of said pipe in accordance with the size of the roll of material mounted between said standards, and a plurality of nozzle members mounted on said pipe and connected to said mixing chamber, said nozzle members directed into the crevice formed where the material is leaving the roll, the rotation of the pipe being controlled to constantly direct Kthe nozzle members toward the crevice of the roll of paper as it diminishes in size.

4. In apparatus for moistening a continuous sheet of material by directing a vapor into the crevice formed where the sheet is leaving the roll, the combination of a pair of vertical standards, means for supporting a roll of material in a horizontal position therebetween, a pair of brackets above said means, a mixing chamber and a horizontal pipe disposed upon said brackets, means for rotating said. pipe, `means for controlling the rotationof said pipe in accordance with the size of the roll of material mounted between said standards, said means including a 'loaded spring connected to said pipe and .rollers -the roll and against the opposite edges of the roll at a point adjacent the unrolling of the sheet therefrom, the combination of a horizontally disposed pipe member mounted above a roll of paper, stationary support members therefor, a plurality of nozzle members secured in spaced relation in the side of said pipe and directed toward the crevice, said nozzle members con nected to a source of vapor under pressure, a pair of pipe members extending at right angles to said horizontal pipe, a pair of nozzle members therein directing toward the crevice at the opposite edges of the roll of paper, means for rotating said pipe and means for controlling the rotation thereof in accordance with the size oi the roll of paper against which said nozzles are directed, said last named means including a loaded spring member connected between a stationary support and saidv horizontally disposed pipe member and a pair of rollers disposed against the outer side oi said roll of paper and `rigidly connected to said horizontal pipe.

6. In apparatus for moistening a continuous sheet of paper on a roll by directing a vapor into the crevice formed where the sheet is leaving the roll and against the opposite edges of the roll at a point adjacent the unrolling of the sheet therefrom, the combination of a horizontally disposed pipe member mounted above a roll of paper, stationary support members therefor, a plurality of nozzle members secured in .spaced relation in ,the side of said pipe and directed toward the crevice, said nozzle members connected to a source oi vapor under pressure, means for rotating said pipe and means for controlling therotation thereof in accordance with the size of the roll o! paper against which said nozzles are directed, said last named means including a loaded spring member connected between a stationary support and said horizontally disposed pipe member and a pair of rollers disposed against the outer side o! said roll of paper and rigidly connected to said horizontal pipe. f

7. In apparatus for moistening a horizontally disposed continuous sheet of paper on a roll by directing a vapor into the crevice formed where the sheet is leaving the roll, the combination of a mixing chamber, means extending horizontally therefrom across the roll of paper being unrolled single spray means associated with said horizontal rmeans directed into the crevice and adapted to spray both sides of the paper simultaneously as the same is being unrolled, and automatic means) associated with said single spray means for gradually changing the direction in which said means are pointed as the size of said roll of paper means including rollers engaging the roll ot paper and means connected between said rollers and said single spray means for changing the direction the single spray means is pointed as the size o! the roll of paper diminishes.

GEORGE C. FLINT.

diminishes said automatic u

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2577886 *Sep 23, 1948Dec 11, 1951Block & Anderson LtdMoistener for hectograph duplicators
US2605741 *Aug 13, 1948Aug 5, 1952Crosby FieldApparatus for coating and coiling metal strip
US2672844 *Jun 21, 1951Mar 23, 1954Vapo Systems CompanyApparatus for treating flexible webs
US4498254 *May 7, 1982Feb 12, 1985Veb Kombinat TextimaSpraying apparatus for laundry mangles
US5711994 *Dec 8, 1995Jan 27, 1998Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Treated nonwoven fabrics
Classifications
U.S. Classification118/315, 118/325, 118/323
International ClassificationF24F6/06
Cooperative ClassificationF24F6/06
European ClassificationF24F6/06