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Publication numberUS2146823 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 14, 1939
Filing dateApr 30, 1936
Priority dateApr 30, 1936
Publication numberUS 2146823 A, US 2146823A, US-A-2146823, US2146823 A, US2146823A
InventorsKarmazin John
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigerating apparatus and method of making same
US 2146823 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. KARMAZIN 2,146,823

REFRIGERATING APPARATUS AND METHOD 0F MAKING SAME Feb. 14, 1939.

Filed April 30, 1936 f, l y

'Patented Feb. 14, 1939 UNITED STATES REFRIGERATINGAPPARATUS AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME John Karmazin, Huntington, Ind., assis-nor to General Motors Corporation, Dayton, Ohio, a corporation oi Delaware Application April so, 193s, serial No. '17,246

9 Claims.

This invention relates to refrigeration. An object of this invention is to provide an improved restrictor for refrlgerating apparatus or the like and method of manufacturing same.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawing wherein a preferred form of the present invention is clearly shown.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic representation of a refrigerating apparatus embodying my invention;

Fig. 2 is a cross-section of the restrictor;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged cross-section of a portion of the restrictor during the process of manufacture;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged cross-section of a portion of the restrictor in finished form; and

Fig. 5 is a cross-section of a portion of Fig. 2, taken transversely thereto.

A refrigerating apparatus embodying features of my invention may include, in general, a sealed motor compressor unit I 0 discharging compressed refrigerant to a condenser I I, from whence liquid refrigerant may iiow through the line I2 and interchanger I3 to the restrictor I4. Here the refrigerant is expanded and is delivered to an evaporator I5 from whence the expanded refrigerant flows through the interchanger I3 and line I6 to the motor compressor unit I8. The electric motor of the compressor unit I0 may be controlled in accordance with refrigerating conditions, such as by a thermostat having a bulb I'I in the space I8 to be refrigerated which actuates a bellows I9 and snap switch 28 winch opens and closes the circuit to the motor of the unit I8.

The restrictor I 4 may be constructed as indicated in Figs. 2 to 5 inclusive. 'I'he restrictor includes an outer cylindrical shell or cup 20 within which a wire is helically coiled. An inner cup or obstruction 22 is placed inside of the wire 2| at any point along the wire. For example, it may be placed at the lower end and may be provided with one or more radial passages 23 leading to the outlet 24 in the bottom of the cup 28. The other end or mouth of the cup 20 may be'closed by a cap 25 to which is attached a screen or lter 26. The cap 25 is provided with a refrigerant inlet 2l. The wire 2| is hermetically secured to the inner surface of the cylinder 28, and the individual coils of the wire 2| are hermetically sealed to each other, to provide a continuous restricted passageway 28, so that the liquid refrigerant entering through the inlet 2l and passing the lter 26 enters the upper end of the passageway 28 and is discharged into the cavity 28 which is connected with the passageway 23 and outlet 24 from'whence the refrigerant is delivered to the evaporator.

'Il'he restrictor may be manufactured very economically. The cylindrical shell 20 may be made of steel and the wire 2| may have a steel core 30 and may be coated with bonding material, -such as copper 3|. The wire is wound inside the shell 20 so that the wire touches the shell 20 all along the circumference. and the individual coils of the spiral touch each other. A small amount of bonding material, such as copper, may also be provided where the cap 25 touches the cylinder 20. The restrictor then is passed through a brazing zone in a reducing atmosphere, such as hydrogen, at a sufiiciently high temperature to cause the copper 3| to braze the individual coils of the wire to each other and to the casing 26 as indicated in Fig. 4. At the same time the rim of the cup 22 is sealed to the wire 2|, so that refrigerant cannot by-pass the passage 28 along the rim of the cup. This can be conveniently accomplished by providing the rim of the cup 22 with a spiral thread at 32 so that the cup can be threaded into the structure, and the brazing at this point forms a complete seal. It is to be understood that the cup 22 need not be placed at the bottom of the structure but may be stopped anywhere along the wire, so long as it seals the inlet of the passageway 28 from its outlet.

The spacing of the loops of the steel core 3|) may be varied, depending on the thickness of the copper coating. I now prefer to make the copper relatively thin so that the loops of the core 36 maybe as close to each other as possible.

While the form of embodiment of the invention as herein disclosed, constitutes a preferred form, it is to be understood that other forms might be adopted, all coming within the scope of the claims which follow.

What is claimed is as follows:

1. A restrictor for a refrigerating system or the like comprising an outer shell having an inlet and an outlet, a looped` wire inside said shell having its periphery sealed to the inside of the shell and its individual loops sealed to each other to form a restrictor passageway between said shell and wire, and means for preventing the bypassing of refrigerant around said passageway.

2. A restrictor for a refrigerating System or the like comprising a cylindrical shell having an inlet and an outlet, a wire helically wound inside said shell and u'having its individual loops sealed'to the inner surface of said cylindrical shell and said loops to each other, and means for preventing by-passing of refrigerant.

3. 'I'he method of manufacturing a restrictor which comprises placing a steel wire in looped form inside of a steel shell, and bonding said wire to the inner surface of said shell and the individual loops of said wire to each other with a relatively small amount of copper in a reducing atmosphere to cause .the formation of a spiral passageway between the looped wire and the inside of said shell.

4. A restrictor for a refrigerating system or the like comprising an outer shell having an inlet and an outlet, a looped Wire inside said shell having its periphery sealed to the inside of the shell and its individual loops sealed to each other to form a restrictor passageway between said shell and wire, and an obstruction to prevent by-passing of refrigerant around said passageway.

5. The method of manufacturing arestrictor which comprises placing a steel wire'inlooped form adjacent a cylindrical surface of a cylindrical steel shell, and bonding said wire to the surface of said shell and the individual loops of said wire to each other with a relatively small amount of copper in a reducing atmosphere to cause the formation of a spiral passageway between the looped wire andthe surface of said shell.

6. The method of manufacturing a restrictor which comprises placing a copper coated steel wire in looped form adjacent a cylindrical surface of a steel cylindrical shell, and placing said restrictor in a brazing zone having a reducing atmosphere and a temperatresumcientiy high to braze said wire to said shell and the loopspf said wire to each other and to cause the formation of a spiral passageway between said wire and shell.

7. A restrictor comprising a cylindrical cup, a wire in looped form in said cup bonded to the interior of said cup and the loops of said wire bonded to each other, the bottom of said cup having a refrigerant passageway, and a cap on the mouth of said cup having a refrigerant passageway.

8. A restrictor comprising a cylindrical cup, a wire in looped form in said cup bonded to the interior of said cup and the loops of said wire bonded to each other, the bottom of said cup having a refrigerant passageway, an obstruction inside said looped wire, and a cap on the mouth of said cup having a refrigerant passageway.

- 9. A restrictor for a refrigerating system or the like comprising a cylindrical shell, a wire helically wound adjacent a cylindrical surface of said shell and having its individual loops sealed to said surface and said loops to each other, with a spiral passageway between said loops and said surface for the passage of fluid in restricted quantities, said passageway having an outlet and an inlet for the iow of said fluid.

- JOHN KARMAZIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2415243 *Oct 20, 1943Feb 4, 1947Bohn Aluminium & Brass CorpRefrigeration apparatus and method of making same
US2430354 *Oct 9, 1942Nov 4, 1947Chrysler CorpTrack for track-laying vehicles
US2539886 *Nov 16, 1945Jan 30, 1951Griscom Russell CoTubeflo section
US2573583 *Jan 3, 1947Oct 30, 1951Kold Hold Mfg CoPlate type refrigerant evaporator
US2622738 *Oct 31, 1947Dec 23, 1952Purolator Products IncSelf-supporting metallic edge type filter unit
US2629922 *Apr 27, 1950Mar 3, 1953Gen ElectricMethod of brazing resistor terminals
US2697868 *Jul 10, 1951Dec 28, 1954Clayton Manufacturing CoMethod of making heating coils
US2842440 *Dec 18, 1953Jul 8, 1958Johan BjorkstenProcess of making structural material by heat bonding wire filaments
US2941279 *Jan 2, 1952Jun 21, 1960Rca CorpMethod of making stem assembly for ultrahigh frequency electron tubes
US2961759 *Mar 5, 1956Nov 29, 1960Siemens AgMethod of making stretched wire grids
US3035333 *Sep 15, 1959May 22, 1962Baehr Edward FMethod of making a regeneratively cooled combustion chamber
US3261078 *Aug 9, 1962Jul 19, 1966Bendix CorpMethod of manufacture of waveguide components
US3680201 *Feb 13, 1969Aug 1, 1972Westinghouse Canada LtdProcess for brazing zirconium alloy elements
US3908702 *May 4, 1973Sep 30, 1975Jan Arie KlosseMixing fluid components
US4230253 *Oct 31, 1979Oct 28, 1980The B. F. Goodrich CompanyMethod of making a caliper brake rotor
US4314397 *May 9, 1980Feb 9, 1982Reynolds Metals CompanyMethod of making a solar heat exchanger
US4411292 *Nov 30, 1981Oct 25, 1983Arminio SchillerFluid flow restrictor device
US7108762 *Jun 12, 2003Sep 19, 2006Cordis CorporationMethod for manufacturing an orifice mechanism capable of low fluid flow rates
US7211076Jun 12, 2003May 1, 2007Cordis CorporationMedical device for fluid delivery having low fluid flow rate
US7678103Jun 12, 2003Mar 16, 2010Cordis CorporationOrifice device for delivering drugs at low fluid flow rates
US7963939 *Apr 24, 2009Jun 21, 2011Thomas ChunSyringe having extended blending path
US8109922 *May 27, 2004Feb 7, 2012Cordis CorporationOrifice device having multiple channels and multiple layers for drug delivery
US8491571May 27, 2004Jul 23, 2013Cordis CorporationOrifice device having multiple channels with varying flow rates for drug delivery
US20040254544 *Jun 12, 2003Dec 16, 2004Russell Scott M.Orifice device for delivering drugs at low fluid flow rates
US20040254563 *Jun 12, 2003Dec 16, 2004Russell Scott M.Method for manufacturing an orifice mechanism capable of low fluid flow rates
US20040267241 *May 27, 2004Dec 30, 2004Russell Scott M.Orifice device having multiple channels and multiple layers for drug delivery
US20050004557 *May 27, 2004Jan 6, 2005Russell Scott M.Orifice device having multiple channels with varying flow rates for drug delivery
US20100274184 *Apr 24, 2009Oct 28, 2010Thomas ChunSyringe having extended blending path
EP1600188A2 *May 26, 2005Nov 30, 2005Cordis CorporationFlow restricting orifice device having multiple channels between multiple coiled layers for drug delivery
EP1600188A3 *May 26, 2005Dec 7, 2005Cordis CorporationFlow restricting orifice device having multiple channels between multiple coiled layers for drug delivery
WO1980000736A1 *Sep 14, 1979Apr 17, 1980Goodrich Co B FCaliper brake rotor
Classifications
U.S. Classification138/42, 228/220, 210/446, 228/182, 138/41, 210/247, 62/511, 210/167.1, 29/890.35, 210/497.1
International ClassificationF25B41/06, F25B40/00
Cooperative ClassificationF25B41/067, F25B2400/052, F25B40/00, F25B2400/054
European ClassificationF25B41/06C