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Publication numberUS2147004 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 14, 1939
Filing dateSep 22, 1937
Priority dateSep 22, 1937
Publication numberUS 2147004 A, US 2147004A, US-A-2147004, US2147004 A, US2147004A
InventorsWark Samuel Arnold, Alfred C Torem
Original AssigneeWark Samuel Arnold, Alfred C Torem
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Beer can
US 2147004 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 14, 1939. s. A. WAIRK ET A; 2,141,004

BEER CAN Filed Sept; 22, 1957 Zhmentor Samuel Arnold Work 3 Alfred C. Tor'ern Q'MA Patented Feb. 14, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE BEER CAN Samuel Arnold Wark and Alfred C. Torem;

Seattle, Wash.

Application September 22, 1937, Serial'No.

3 Claims.

Our invention relates fluids under pressure are to be held,

designed as a can for beer.

Canned beer is particularly suitable for transporting to out-of-the-way places, as on picnics, yachting, fishing, etc., but when it is to be drunk it is necessary to Our invention may forms, and in various containers, and in various 3 larly such as pertain to diiferent uses or environclaims which terminate this specification.

In the accompanying drawing we haveshown forms, and this drawing is intended as informative rather than restrictive.

Figure 1 is a top can cover, showing our invention incorporated plan view of a portion of a r therein, in a form which is at present preferred by uS.

her of assembly.

Figure 6 is a view similar a slight modification in the form of the individual showing a further modification. V

As'we have stated above, the invention is apface of the inner disk 5. Thus it reinforces is not secured to the top I,

2 instance, latex similar to that employed in sealing the parts at the seam 3, may be employed, and 6 in Figure 4. This seals about the edge of the disk and about the edge of the hole 4.

Thus sealed, whether by reliance wholly upon the internal pressure or by the application of the sealing substance 6, the disk 5 is not readily displaced by accident, but it can be displaced by inwardly directed pressure of a .thumb through the aperture upon the disk, in the manner illustrated in Figure 3. 1

To prevent accidental dislodgment of the disk 5 we prefer to protect it by an outer disk I. This may take various erably it is primarilyof the same shape as the disk 5, and thus marginally overlaps the hole 4. It may be embossed downwardly, as shown in Figures 2, 4 and 5, whereby its center is disposed within the aperture 4 and contacts the upper s the inner disk against the inward pressure. The outer disk 1 is preferably held in place against accidental removal, as for instance in the form shown in Figure 4, by the spreading of the adhesive substance 6 between the two disks, the disk 1 being embossed to substantially contact the disk 5, with the adhesive 6 between them. In the form shown in Figure 5 the adhesive is arranged in a small ring, as shown at 6|, only about the margin of the inner disk 5, and is similarly arranged in a ring 62 about the margin only of the outer disk 1.

The outer disk is provided with a tab 8 which but which can be hinged back so that it may be grasped between the thumb and forefinger, in the manner illustrated in Figure 2. This enables the outer disk I to be lifted, the only resistance being the adhesion of the sealing substance. In this manner the disk I can be removed when its removal is desired, yet accidental removal is extremely unlikely. Once the outer disk 1 is removed, the inner disk 5 may be pressed inwardly, as shown in Figure 3, in opposition to sealing compound and to the internal pressure, and the contents of the can are immediately accessible. All of this may be accomplished without theuse of any tools whatsoever, and by a construction which is simple in the extreme, and which will be found particularly suitable for use in beer cans.

Figure 6 illustrates a slight reversal of the form shown in Figure 2, for here the inner disk 5 is dished upwardly, and the outer disk 1 is plane. With respect to the embossing of one or the other of the disks, it should be pointed out that the edges of the embossed portion preferably do not contact with the edges of the hole 4, as is best shown in Figures 4 and 5. The embossed disk is in no sense analogous to the wellknown friction top or closure, where the securement of the top is accomplished by engagement of an embossed portion within the edge of an aperture. In this closure the space between the edge of the hole 4 and the embossed portion of one or the other of the disks is free and clear, and there is no necessary contact. This space may become filled with some of the sealing substance, but there is in no sense a frictional engagement here which is relied upon to retain either disk in position, except as it aids in preventing movement of the disk in the plane of the top forms and shapes, though pref-' the adhesion of the In Figure '1 both the inner and outer disks are shown as plane, but with a disk 9 interposed between them. The disk 9 may be secured to one or to the other of the disks 5 or I, or to neither. It is in effect merely a spacer between the two plane disks, and might indeed be formed of the material cut out to form the aperture 4.

The same principles may be embodied in containers where the contents are not under pressure, or are even subjected to reduced pressure, as in a vacuum-pack. In the latter case, at least, the disk 5 would be applied to the outside of the apertured wall of the container, the better to resist the higher inwardly directed pressure of the atmosphere. Should the contents be under no particular pressure, positive or negative, the invention will still be' desirable and effective, and the latex 6 will serve as the principal sealing agent.

What we claim as our invention is:

1. In combination with a sealed container for retailing beer or a like liquid under pressure, having an aperture in its top or other wall of a size to admit the consumers finger, a disk within the container underlying and marginally underlapping the aperture, whereby the internal pressure acts to press the disk outwardly to a seat about the margin of the aperture, and the disk is unseated by pressure inwardly directed upon the disk, through the aperture, a second disk seated upon the outside of the container top, at the aperture, and protecting the first disk against inwardly directed pressure, and a sealing compound or the like to support the second disk in such position, readily releasable without tools for access to the first disk.

2. In combination with a sealed container for beer or a like liquid under pressure, having an aperture in its top or other wall, of a size to admit the consumers finger, a sheet metal disk within the container underlying and marginally underlapping the aperture, whereby the internal pressure acts to press the disk outwardly to a seat about the margin of the aperture, and the disk is unseated by pressure of the consumers finger inwardly directed upon the disk, through the aperture, to fall free within the container, a second sheet metal disk seated upon the outside of the container top, surrounding the aperture, and engaging the first disk through the aperture, whereby the outside disk protects the inside disk against inwardly directed pressure, and reinforces the inside disks resistance to outwardly directed pressure, and a sealing compound or the like to support the outside disk in such position, readily releasable for access to the first disk.

3. In combination with a sealed can for beer or the like, having a dispensing hole formed in its top, of a size to admit the consumers finger,

a sheet metal disk applied to the inner face of the top, of a size to marginally underlap the hole, and a second disk applied to the outer face of the top, and contacting the inner disk through the hole, of a size to marginally overlap the hole, and a sealing substance acting to prevent leakage past the edge of' the hole, and holding the disks in place against accidental removal, but permitting separation of the outer disk, and then separation of the inner disk by inward pressure, all without the use of tools.

SAMUEL ARNOLD WARK. ALFRED C. TOREM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2521598 *Dec 24, 1946Sep 5, 1950Bramwell Moyle WilliamCombination can opener and spout
US2615610 *Dec 26, 1947Oct 28, 1952American Can CoContainer with reclosure and shield device
US2619255 *Jan 13, 1948Nov 25, 1952Louise Bricout MarieSealed metallic container
US2719647 *Jan 26, 1951Oct 4, 1955Olive FreemanCan tops
US2870935 *Jan 27, 1955Jan 27, 1959Suzanne Kaaren BlackmerContainer seal
US3081926 *Feb 1, 1961Mar 19, 1963Harry A NewtonContainers and closures therefor
US3119509 *Nov 1, 1961Jan 28, 1964Livesay Frank RContainer closure
US3151766 *Feb 10, 1961Oct 6, 1964Continental Can CoPull tab tear strip combination for metal can end
US3223277 *Dec 10, 1963Dec 14, 1965American Can CoContainer closure
US3302818 *May 13, 1964Feb 7, 1967American Can CoContainer with easy-open end
US3308986 *Sep 30, 1964Mar 14, 1967American Can CoPlastisol coatings for easy-open container ends
US3312368 *Sep 9, 1964Apr 4, 1967Reynolds Metals CoEasy-open can end
US3334775 *Feb 23, 1965Aug 8, 1967HarperGated can lid
US3339788 *Oct 22, 1965Sep 5, 1967Nat Can CorpContainer
US3355059 *May 13, 1964Nov 28, 1967American Can CoLaminate with severable portion
US3365095 *Jun 26, 1964Jan 23, 1968Nat Can CorpContainer with integral tear strip
US3871550 *May 29, 1973Mar 18, 1975Continental Can CoPush-in easy opening container
US3967749 *May 29, 1973Jul 6, 1976Continental Can Company, Inc.Easy opening end closure for a container and method of making the same
US4065025 *Jul 1, 1976Dec 27, 1977Crown Cork & Seal Company, Inc.Easy opening can end with push-in tabs
US4538396 *Nov 12, 1981Sep 3, 1985Kenji NakamuraProcess for producing a re-sealable dispenser-container
US4557398 *Aug 17, 1984Dec 10, 1985International Paper CompanyEnd closure structure for a container
US4987081 *Mar 23, 1988Jan 22, 1991Gb Biotech Inc.Chemical/biological process to oxidize multimetallic sulphide ores
US5089412 *Nov 7, 1989Feb 18, 1992Gb Biotech Inc.Chemical/biological leaching; three types bacteria, mainly L. ferrooxidans
US5482175 *Dec 28, 1993Jan 9, 1996Arrar; Naseem B.Pressurized container top
US20100227191 *Jan 28, 2010Sep 9, 2010Brown Mckay CScore line corrosion protection for container end walls
DE1264317B *Oct 22, 1965Mar 21, 1968Jagenberg Werke AgAufreissoffnung fuer fluessigkeitsdichte Behaelter aus Papier, Karton od. dgl.
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/258.1, 220/906
International ClassificationB65D17/50
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2517/5029, Y10S220/906, B65D2517/0011, B65D2517/5064, B65D2517/0061, B65D2517/5005, B65D2517/5083, B65D2517/0013, B65D17/505
European ClassificationB65D17/50A3