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Publication numberUS2147310 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 14, 1939
Filing dateMay 16, 1935
Priority dateMay 16, 1935
Publication numberUS 2147310 A, US 2147310A, US-A-2147310, US2147310 A, US2147310A
InventorsMorrison Charles C
Original AssigneeBinney And Smith Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of dry color painting
US 2147310 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 14, 1939'. c. c. MORRISON METHOD OF DRY COLOR PAINTING F iled May 16, 1955 I NVENTO Cfiaries CMorrzs W ATTORNEY.

Patented Feb: 14, 1939 UNITEIj .STATES PATENT orrlca 2,147,310 I 7 METHOD 1 OF DRY COLOR. PAINTING Charles C. Morrison, New York, N. Y., assignor to Binney and Smith 00., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey Application May 16,1935, Serial No. 21,77:

6 Claims.

The present invention relates to an improvement in methods for producing hand colored pictures with dry pigments.

Such pigments are made of dry, pulverulent of other materials, than metal.

Such color compacts are friable. and as compacted, are easily and readily reduced to a powder by manually drawin across h fa e the of a delineating, brush-like im lement which nicks up the reduced, powdered pigment produced by the stroke thereof, and by which thepicked uo pigment is then applied to a picture receivin surface, by drawing the implement across said surfacein a manner to producethe desired color impression, in the desired picturizin outlines. color tones and masses. The picked-up color upon the implement is thus transferred to the a said surface, and in accord with the amount of color picked up and carried by the implement and the pressure upon the implemen during the plcturizing stroke. any shade of said color or colors may be attained. The thinness of the layer of the pulverulent material can be made to depend upon the pressure and amount of material transferred.

Such dry colors are easily blended with other colors upon the picture receiving surface to any desired degree and shade. Any two or more colors may be blended so as to produce any desired mixed color, at the will of the user.

Such color compacts may be dispensed in sets of three primary colors such as red. yellow and blue, together with a black compact, from which other intermediate colors may be obtained by blending, or the sets of color compac s may be f made up of primary colors and individual,- intermediate colors. w

In addition to the foregoing, the color pick-u and applying implements, hereinafter denoted will be apprehended as the herein description proceeds and it is obvious that modifications may be made in the disclosures herein without departing from the spirit hereof or the scope of the appended claims.

In the drawing, I

Fig. 1 is a view'in front elevation of one form of dry color applying implement;

Fig. 2 is a fragmented side view of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a front view of a modified form of implement, broken at the handle for convenience;

Fig. 4 is a fragmented side view of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a transverse section of a solid pouncet similar in outline to the pouncet of Fig. 1, removed from the ferrule;

- Fig. 6 is a cross section of another form of pouncet;

Fig. '7 is a cross section of an edged form of pouncet;

Fig. 8 is a plan view pa t;

Fig. 9 is a sectional view taken on the diameter of the device of Fig. 8;

Fig. 10 is a section of a similar view to Fig. 9, made with a crowned color compact;

Fig. 11 is a perspective view of a ferrule detached from its handle;

Fig. 12 is a perspective view of a pouncet clamp; and I r Fig. 13 is across sectional view of the ferrule of Fig. '11 and the clamp of Fig. 12 assembled to clampably and removablyhold a pouncet in opof a mounted color comerative position. I

The color compacts, as in Figs. 8, 9 and 10, comprise a compacted color disclor cake l3, Figs. 3 8 and 9, or I6, as in Fig. 10, these being relatively shallow but also of relatively large diameter for affording convenience and suitable area in charging the pouncet with color by a stroking motion. These compacts may be made of a finely divided 40 lecturers chalk or other chalk powder colored to suit desired shades and compressed in dies of desired contour and capacity either in dry condition, or mixed, when desired, with a binder before compacting. The compacts thus made are friable and easily reduced to powder, by a pouncet, upon strokingthe compact on its exposed surface.

The compacts l3 or IE are preferably mounted in flanged, shallow pans 12', the flanged perimeter i2 thereof being out-turned as at l4, to form a seat, to retain the completed compact in an opening in a-palette board l5, Fig. 9, the board being shown in fragmented. section, in said figure. As previously outlined, these color compact 56 sets may be furnished in a wide range of colors or may be provided in a set of primary colors, including a black compact.

The implements, as in Figs. 1 to 4 inclusive and Fig. 13, comprise handle portions I having, preferably, metallic ferrules 2, as in Figs. 1 to 4 which are conformably constructed to flxedly engage said handle portions, and to operatively support therein pouncets 3 and 4, Figs. 1 to 4, inclusive.

The pouncets 3, 4, Figs. 1 to 4, and of Fig. 13, may be made up in many ways and of many materials. They may also be constructed to be flexible or inflexible, according to requirements of delineation. The pouncet ends may be rounded, square or pointed. A pouncet 3, as in Figs. 1 and 2 may be constructed of a folded piece of flat felt with the contacting ends enclosed in the ferrule, as shown dotted, leaving the exposed operative end 3 rounded, with sharp corners, or as in Figs. 3 and 4, the pouncet 4 may be made of rubber with an exposed rectangular end. The rubber may be soft, may be made of solid rubber, with an eraser like flexibility or it may be made of sponge rubber with the cells thereof exposed.

Other forms of pouncet are illustrated in Figs. 5, 6 and '7. In Fig. 5, by way of illustration there is shown in section a single piece pouncet 5 having a tough rubber ferrule engaging end 6 and a softer rubber color applying end I.

In Figs. 6 and 7, are shown, in cross section, two characteristic forms of pouncets both having solid cores 8 and I0, respectively, coated or covered on the outside with a flexible coating 9 which can be of soft rubber or latex. The cores The pouncet of Fig. '7 has a sharpened end I I thereof. This latter pouncet may be used for applying dry color to the picture surface in broad strokes, or it may be used to pick out high lights on the picture surface by its sharpened end, after the application of dry color thereto.

In the implement shown in Figs. 11, 12, and 13, there is disclosed a ferrule portion, made, preferably, of sheet metal in a shell form, the ferrule comprising the handle engaging portion l8 and the pouncet receiving and H.

In Fig. 12, there is shown a perspective view of a pouncet clamp, made of sheet metal into a U shaped member having upstanding side portions or walls l9 and 20, joined at the bottom with an integral connecting portion 24. The upper ends of the side walls are provided with short outstanding stop flanges 2l-22 to act as stops Fig. 13, when the clamp is pushedinto the pouncet receiving end ll of the ferrule. The upstanding sidewalls l9 and 20 of the clamp are each provided with an indent 23, near the flanged ends; said indents acting to bite into the opposite faces of the pouncet base 26, when entered into the ferrule end l1, and thus clamp the pouncet in removable, adjustable position therein. To remove the pouncet the clamp is grasped at the flanges 2| and 22 and withdrawn from the ferrule. Then the side walls is and 20 may be slightly separated disengaging the indents 23 from the pouncet whereupon the pouncet may be adjusted or replaced by another pouncet and then replaced in the ferrule. The extending operative point 25 of the pouncet illustrates another shape useful in this mode of colored picture delineation.

The operative faces of the pouncets can be wide, intermediate or narrow, wide if a considerable mass is to be depicted and narrow for flner stroke depiction.

The pouncets above described, while of varied or solid rubber of different degrees of flexibility,-

or made of an inflexible core with a resilient coating, all have one feature in common and that is that the pick-up surfaces must have a texture, such texture could be similar to the surface texture of cut felt, or it could. be somewhat like a grained surface or it could be formed like adjoining cells, as on a cut-faced rubber sponge.

The resultant picture made by the use of dry color and the implements as disclosed herein, produce a result somewhat like pastel in appearance.

However, the system is particularly adapted for depicting colored pictures in broad strokes and mass effects. The system paints rather than draws, and is particularly good for blocking in masses.

The system herein is especially adapted for childrens use, and for use in schools. Good effects are more easily obtained than with line work; and there is no liquid to spill.

The surface upon which the picturizing is to be done should also be rough and not smooth, for best effects, for instance, so-called charcoal" paper gives a good result because the surface thereof is textured, i. e. regularly roughened. Paper having a stippled or grained surface is quite effective and produces best results.

After the picture has been delineated, the surface thereof may be sprayed with a fixative to preserve the picture against smudging and rub- I bing off.

The term picture as used herein refers to sketches, compositions, designs, portraits, perspectives, landscapes and other fine arts, pictures or the like, as distinguished from skin and face painting, rouging or the like.

I claim as my invention:

1. A method of producing pictures from fine dry pulverulent material upon a surface by means of a yieldable applicator, said method comprising adhering to the face of said applicator a small quantity of the fine dry material; drawing said applicator along an area of said surface to be material; similarly applying fine dry materials of other colors to said layer; and pressing the applicator back and forth across the layer until the colors are smoothly blended with free hand edge portions.

2. In the art of producing pictures by means of an applicator having a yieldable applying face the method which comprises adhering to said face a small mass of dry pulverulent' material; and applying said mass onto a picture receiving surface by means of free-hand brush-painting technique strokes of the applicator to form a layer of the material; similarly applying pulverulent material of another color to said surface; and blending the colors with the applicator.

3. In the art of producing pictures by means of a soft applicator having a yieldable applying face the method which comprises adhering to said face a small mass of dry pulv'rulent material of a primary color; and applying said mass onto a picture receiving surface by means of freehand brush-painting technique strokes of the applicator to form a layer of the material; similarly applying pulverulent material of another primary 'covered, thereby to deposit a layer of the dry color to said surface; and blending the colors with the applicator to form an intermediate color.

4. A method of producing pictures from fine dry pulverulent material upon a surface by means of a yieldable applicator, said method comprising adhering to the face of said applicator a small quantity of the line dry material; drawing said applicator along an area of said surface to be covered, thereby to deposit axlayer of the dry material; similarly applying a second layer of fine dry material over said first layer; and pressing the applicator back and forth across the layers until the deposited material is smoothly blended with free hand edge portions.

5. In the art of producing pictures by means of an applicator having a yieldable applying face the method which comprises adhering to said face a small mass of dry pulverulent material; and

applying said mass onto a picture receiving surface by means of free-hand brush-painting'technique stroke of the applicator to form a layer of the material; similarly applying a second layer of pulverulent material to said surface; and blending the materials of the layers with the applicator. 6. In the art of producing pictures by means of a soft applicatorhaving a yieldable applying face themethod which comprises adhering to said face a small mass of dry pulverulent coloring material; and applying said mass onto a picture receiving surface by means of free-hand brush-painting technique strokes of the applicator to form a layer of the material; similarly applying additional pulverulent material to said surface; and blending the applied materials with the applicator to form an even tone.

CHARLES C. MORRISON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3003182 *Aug 13, 1959Oct 10, 1961Speedry Chemical Products IncFountain pens
US3030649 *Jan 27, 1960Apr 24, 1962Cosimo PerrucciConstruction of brushes
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Classifications
U.S. Classification427/189, 15/160, 15/210.1, 15/209.1, 427/201, 401/118, 427/197, 401/290, 15/194
International ClassificationB44D2/00
Cooperative ClassificationB44D2/00
European ClassificationB44D2/00