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Publication numberUS2148152 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 21, 1939
Filing dateFeb 13, 1937
Priority dateFeb 13, 1937
Publication numberUS 2148152 A, US 2148152A, US-A-2148152, US2148152 A, US2148152A
InventorsDosberg Paul P
Original AssigneeDosberg Paul P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable apron
US 2148152 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D Feb. 21, 1939. P. P. qosBERG I I 2,148,152

ADJUSTABLE APRQN Filed Feb. '13, 1957 z'sneets-she t 1- INVENTOR' Paul J? Dosbeg W7 ATTORNEY Feb. 21, 1939. P. P. DOSBERG ADJUSTABLE APRON 2 Sheets-Shet 2 Filed Feb. 13, 1957 Patented Feb. 21, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ADJUSTABLE APRON Paul P. Dosberg, Bufi'alo, N. Y. Application February 13, 1937, Serial No. 125,613

3 Claims.

This invention relates to adjustable aprons suitable for use by workmen, and it has particular reference to aprons which are readily cleaned or laundered and are physically resistant to the processes of cleaning normally used, and which may withal be readily adjusted to fit the bodies of persons of difierent stature.

The present invention is occasioned byproblems arising from the use of protective aprons by industrial workers. Due to a number of factors, workmen, while recognizing the desirability of an apron to be worn while engaged in their industrial tasks, will forego such apparel if it is diflicult to clean, does not have a long life, and is not readily adjustable into a comfortable protective position. The cost of maintenance of such aprons must also be low, because of the economic burden which otherwise might be imposed. Aprons with which I am familiar have failed to meet satisfactorily all of these criteria. Some have lacked adjustability. Others were so constructed as to be caught in the customary laundering machinery, and therefore were lacking in life or entailed high maintenance charges.

In answer to the present problem, I have devised industrial aprons, two specific forms of which are hereinafter discussed, but which, as it will appear, have a number of common features. Such aprons have been found from experience to be satisfactory and to meet the requirements outlined above.

In the drawings illustrating the invention,

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary plan of the apron shown in Fig. 1, drawn on an enlarged scale and with the shoulder straps laid flat on the body of the apron;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary detail showing how the tie strap may be secured in the associated eyelet;

Fig. 4 is aperspective view of a second embodiment of the invention; and,

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary detail showing the tie strap positioning loops and the mode of securing the tie strap therein.

The apron illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 comprises a fabric body Ill having an upper or chest portion II merging into a lower portion I2 adapted to cover the legs of the wearer and encircle the waist. The upper margin is cut to form a neck portion I3 defined at either side by tab portions I4, which are contiguous with the side margins I5 of the chest portion, which in turn merge into the upper margins of the waist portion I6. These various marginal portions may be hemmed, as indicated by the numeral I1. It will be observedthat the lower portion I2, from the waist line 16 down, is of substantially greater width than the chest portion II, and it will of (01. 2-52) course be understood that the views here presented are taken from the back of the apron.

Shoulder straps I8 are secured to each tab I4 adjacent the neck line, as indicated by the numeral I9. I As shown in Fig. 2, each strap I8 is of such length that, when laid flat on the body I0, it terminates short of the Waist. The opposite ends of the straps I8 are brought together and are mutually secured, as. indicated by the numeral 2|, thus forming a V having a downwardly extending apex which, in use, will rest against the back of the wearer at a point be tween the shoulders and waist. The length of the shoulder straps is significant from the viewpoints of comfort and adjustability. If they are too short, the weight of the apron may be imposed on the neck, rather than the shoulders, While if the straps are too long it is diflicult to obtain satisfactory adjustment. The relative proportions of the parts, as illustrated in Fig. 2, however, have been found satisfactory and to adapt the apron to workmen of various heights andsizes.

A triangular fabric body 22 of the general form of an isosceles triangle is connected, at its acute apex, to the apex formed by the joining of the straps I8, thus permitting the base 23 to lie generally parallel to the waist line when the apron is worn. The body 22 may be formed continuous with one of the straps I8, thereby adding to the strength of the member and reducing the cost. 9

The body 22 should have a greater length than width. Secured to the base of the body is a tie strap 24 having free ends which project from either side thereof.

The upper marginal corners 25 of the lower portion I2 are each formed with an eyelet, which may be reinforced by a metal grommet 26. It will be understood that when the apron is placed on the body, the free ends of the tie strap 24 are inserted through the eyelets 26, and are then drawn around in the back and tied to secure the apron in place. To apply and adjust the apron, the workman places the V formed by the straps over the neck, with the chest portion I I in front, A

and then reaches back to seize the tie straps and insert them through the eyelets. As the free ends ofthe straps are pulled up, the triangle 22, and hence the shoulder straps l8,- are pulled down, thus bringing the neck portion 53 to a suitable position. Because of the lengths of the straps and extension member 22, adjustability of the-apron to wearers of different height, or in various positions on the same wearer, is readily secured.

As'. shown in Fig. 3, one free end of the tie "strap 24 may be looped over on itself to provide a return bend or detent 21 secured throughout, except for the extremity 29, fiat against the main body of the tie by the stitches 28. The

eyelet 26 is of such size that, when the tab 29 is pressed flat against the body of the strap 24, the entire looped portion can be easily passed through the eye. When the tab 29 is not so held, however, it springs outwardly and thus engages the eye when the strap is pulled in the reverse direction. Accordingly, the looped end of the tie strap will not come out of the eyelet unless it is intentionally removed. It has been found that this is an advantageous feature, since the workman can readily apply or remove the apron with one tie strap in place, and the previous securing of the strap facilitates the positioning of the garment.

Aprons intended for industrial service must be laundered on a commercial scale, because they become quite soiled. It is not expedient, or economical, to resort to hand cleaning methods, and therefore mechanical washers and like machinery has been resorted to. Unless, however, the apron is so constructed as not to be caught or torn in the washer, it has little value, due to the destruction of the article and the expense of repair. It has been found that aprons made in accordance with the present invention can be repeatedly passed through the washing and laundering apparatus without becoming snarled or torn, thereby greatly adding to the life and practicability.

The apron shown in Figs. 4 and 5 is generally similar, with respect to its body and shoulder strap portions, to the apron just described, and repetition of such description is therefore deemed unnecessary, since like parts are designated with the same reference numerals. It will be observed, however, that a specifically different construction is employed for the piece joined to the apex of the V formed by the shoulder straps l8.

Connected to the shoulder straps l8 at the apex thereof is an extension strap 3| of such length as to extend down the back of the wearer to a point adjacent the waist. The lower end of the extension strap is looped over to form two spaced loops 32 and 33, one below the other,

- which are further defined by the stitches 34 and '35. to receive the free ends of the tie straps 36 and 31, one end of each of which is secured to the The bight of each loop is sufiiciently large corners 25. The tie straps may therefore be inserted through whichever loop is preferred for adjustment purposes, and thereafter tied together to secure the apron in place.

One of the tie straps 36 is looped over at its end to form a return bend or detent 38, the extremity of which may flare outwardly, as indicated by the numeral 39, to achieve the same purposes as those ascribed to the tab 29 shown in Fig. 3. The workman passes the strap 36 through the desired loop 32 or 33, and, after the free end is pulled through, there remains enough free space to permit of the insertion of the strap 31. When the apron is removed, only one tie strap is withdrawn from the loop, the other being held in place by the tab 39 until intentionally disengaged.

The apron of Figs. 4 and 5 is, like the apron of Fig. 1, readily positioned on the wearer in a comfortable and protective manner, and has been found to be durable in withstanding the effects of laundering machinery and processes.

While it is not intended to claim all modes of constructing a durable adjustable apron suited for industrial use, it will nevertheless be understood that the invention is susceptible of variations and changes from the precise forms herein illustrated, and it is intended to include within the scope of the invention all of such modifications as fall within the context of the following claims.

I claim:

1. In an industrial workmans apron having a leg covering portion and waist encircling portion and a chest covering portion of reduced width, shoulder straps secured in spaced relation to the upper part of the chest covering portion and brought together in a position at the back of the wearer affording free unhampered movement when applied, one of said straps having an integral extension downwardly from the point of juncture of the straps at the back and folded upon itself and secured in folded position to provide one or more loops, and tie strap means connected to the rear ends of the waist portion for adjustable engagement with said extension, said tie strap means being adapted to be located in the proper loop for providing the desired adjustment, said apron conforming to the body of the wearer and being adjustable to fit wearers of different height and girth and readily adaptable to laundering and fiat ironing of the same.

2. In an industrial workmans apron having a leg covering portion and waist encircling portion and a chest covering portion of reduced width, shoulder straps secured in spaced relation to the upper part of the chest covering portion and brought together in a. position at the back of the wearer affording free unhampered movement when applied, one of said straps having an integral extension downwardly from the point of juncture of the straps at the back and folded upon itself and secured in such folded position to provide one or more loops, and tie strap means connected to the rear ends of the waist portion for adjustable engagement with said extension,

said tie strap means being adapted to be located in the proper loop for providing the desired adjustment, said apron conforming to the body of the wearer and being adjustable to fit wearers of different height and girth and readily adaptable to laundering and flat ironing of the same, said tie strap means having an end portion looped upon itself and fastened at a point inwardly from its free end to provide a'detent to prevent said end from being pulled through said loop.

3. In an industrial workmans apron having a leg covering portion and waist encircling portion and a chest covering portion of reduced width, shoulder straps secured in spaced relation to the upper part of the chest covering portion and brought together in a position at the back of the wearer affording ,free unhampered movement when applied, one of said straps having an integral extension downwardly from the point of juncture of the straps at the back, and tie strap means connected to the lower end of the downward extension and adjustably fastening together said lower end and the rear ends of the waist portion of the apron, said tie strap means having an end portion looped upon itself and fastened at a point inwardly of its free end to provide a detent to prevent disengagement of said free end, said apron 'adjustably conforming to the body of the wearer and being readily adaptable to laundering and flat ironing of the same.

PAUL P. DOSBERG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2420091 *Feb 14, 1944May 6, 1947Selma NordlingChest and shoulder protector
US2426565 *Jun 21, 1944Aug 26, 1947Quinn Garment CompanyGarment
US2442895 *Jul 22, 1946Jun 8, 1948Ray Hill HarveyApron
US4412369 *Jun 11, 1982Nov 1, 1983Angelica CorporationHook-like end for drawstring
US5082289 *Nov 5, 1990Jan 21, 1992Paranto Steve ARebound game garment
US5140708 *Mar 10, 1990Aug 25, 1992Repack Surgical Enterpises, Inc.Surgical gowns and pass cards therefor
US6769137 *Oct 24, 2001Aug 3, 2004D'annunzio Timothy B.Cutaway vests
US6948188 *Jun 15, 2004Sep 27, 2005Paraclete Armor & Equipment, Inc.Cutaway vests
US7020897Feb 24, 2004Apr 4, 2006Eagle Industries Unlimited, Inc.Cut away vest
US7047570Jul 8, 2003May 23, 2006Eagle Industries Unlimited, Inc.Cut away vest
US7243376Apr 6, 2006Jul 17, 2007Eagle Industries Unlimited, Inc.Cut away vest
US7424748Jun 6, 2006Sep 16, 2008Eagle Industries Unlimited, Inc.Quick release system for armor plates in a ballistic resistant vest and method
US7987523Jan 25, 2007Aug 2, 2011Eagle Industries Unlimited, Inc.Quick release garment
US8490212Feb 5, 2007Jul 23, 2013Eagle Industries Unlimited, Inc.Quick release garment
WO2010142384A2 *May 27, 2010Dec 16, 2010Paul Hartmann AktiengesellschaftDisposable overalls for medical, chemical or biotechnological domains and method for producing a disposable apron
WO2010142384A3 *May 27, 2010Feb 10, 2011Paul Hartmann AktiengesellschaftDisposable overalls for medical, chemical or biotechnological domains and method for producing a disposable apron
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/52
International ClassificationA41D13/04
Cooperative ClassificationA41D13/04
European ClassificationA41D13/04