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Publication numberUS2149481 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 7, 1939
Filing dateJan 27, 1936
Priority dateJan 27, 1936
Publication numberUS 2149481 A, US 2149481A, US-A-2149481, US2149481 A, US2149481A
InventorsEdward Van Bosch, Reinhold H Hoffman
Original AssigneeMaurice Van Bosch
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic shade
US 2149481 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E, VAN BOSCH ET AL .March 7, 1939.

AUTOMATIC SHADE Filed Jan. 27; 1936 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 March 7, 1939. E. VAN BoscH ET AL AUTOMATIC SHADE Filed Jan. 27, 1956 s Sheets-Sheet 2 March 7, 1939.

E. VAN BOSCH ET AL 2,149,481

AUTOMATIC SHADE Filed Jan. 27, 1936 s 5 Sheets-Sheet Patented Mar. 7, 1939 PATENT ori ice AUTOMATIC SHADE Edward Van Bosch and Reinhold H. Hoflman, Chicago, Ill.; said Edward Van Bosch assignor to Maurice Van Bosch, Chicago, Ill.

Application January 27, 1936, Serial No. 61,021

7 Claims.

The invention consists in the several novel features which are hereinafter set forth and are more particularly defined by claims at the conclusion hereof. I

In the drawings: Fig. 1 is a view, partly in elevation and partly in segt'mn, of a shade embodying the invention.

Fig. 21s a horizontal section on line 2-2 of Fig. l.

Flg B is a vertical section on line 3-330: Fig. 1.

4 is a detail vertical section through a pair of vanes on an enlarged scale. Fig. 5 is a side elevation of the automatic coupling device between the electric motor and the gearing for raising the shade. Fig. 6 is a section on line 66 of Fig. 5. Fig.7 is a detail showing the electromagneticallyreleased brake for the raising and lowering mechanism. Fig. 8 is a section on line 8-8 of Fig. 1. Fig. 9 is a detail perspective of one of the vanes and its connecting-chains. Fig. 10 is a. diagram of the electrical connections for thermostatically and manually controlling the shade. Fig. 11 is a diagram of a modification illustrating the connections for controlling the operation of the shade automatically by means of a photoelectric cell.

The invention is exemplified as applied to a window comprisinga frame l5 which may be of any suitable construction, and upper and lower sashes i6 and Il slidably mounted in the frame. The shade is illustrated as applied on the outer side of the window, and comprises a vertical series of vanes I8, preferably of sheet metal. Each vane I is provided at either end with a projecting pintle IS on its medial longitudinal axis. Vertical anglebars 20 are secured to the side of the frame I!) to form channels for vertically guiding the pintles. These pintles is are preferably secured in outstruck tongues 2| in the vanes and project into guideways formed in the bars 20. These channels and pintles serve to guide the vanes vertically and to retain them against transversebodily movement. The inner and outer margins of the entire series of vanes are connected for uniform tilting by chains 22. Rings 23 extend through and are fixedly secured in the vanes. The cross-wires 24 of the chains 22, which are formed oflooped wire, extend through the rings 23. Rings 23 are normally split to receive the cross-wires 24 and then closed to retain said wires, and to pivota'llyco'nnect the margins of the chains and the vanes.

The uppermost vane I8 isheld against vertical movement in the channels 20, having aflixed thereto a shaft 25. Manually-operable mechanism for tilting. the vanes to open and close the shade comprises, a handle 26 fixed to a shaft 21 which is joumaled in lugs 28 and has affixed thereto a worm 29, a worm-gear 30 engaged by worm 29 and fixed to the lower end of a vertical shaft 3!, a bevelled pinion 32, fixed to'the upper 'end of shaft 3| and a bevelled pinion 33 fixed to the shaft 25 of the upper vane. This mechanism is preferably placed in a recess providedin the wall at one end of the window-frame and the handle 26 is located within convenient reach.

Mechanism for raising and lowering the shade 1 comprises a transverse shaft 36 which extends across the upper position of the window and is iournaled in bearings 31 which are fixed to the 20 frame i5; drums or spools 38, which are fixed to said shaft; and metal tapes 39, which have their lower ends pivotally connected to the lowermost vane, extend vertically through central slots dB in all of the other vanes and have their upper ends secured to the drum or spools 38, respectively. When the drums 38 are rotated in one direction, the tapes 39 will be wound thereon and will, commencing with the lowermost wane, serially lift the vanes until they have all been lifted and brought together adjacent the uppermost vane. When the drums 38 are released to rotate in the opposite direction, the vanes willbelowered by gravity. During this raising and lowering move ment, each vane will be guided vertically by its pintles l9 and between channels in bars 26. If desired, the lowermost vane may be weighted or made of suflicient weight to insure the lowering of the vanes Toy-gravity. Mechanism for operating shaft 36 to raise the shade by power from an electricmotor ti, comprises a clutch composed of a member 32 which is operatively connected to the motor shaft and a coacting clutch-member 43; a shaft 44 coaxial with the shaft of motor ll mounted in a bearing 45 and to which member 43 is fixed; a pinion l6 fixed to shaft 44; and a gear "fixed to shaft 36. A spring 48 normally holds clutch-members 42, 43 apart so that shaft 46 is normally uncoupled from clutch-member 62 and the motor. Clutchmember 42 is connected to theshaft of motor I by a pin 49, which is fixed to said shaft and a helical slot 50 formed in the hub of member 42. When the motor ll is operated, pin 49 will engage the walls of the helical slot 50 and move clutch- 55 member 42 axially into engagementv with clutchmember 43. When the motor stops, spring 48 will move clutch-member 42 axially to uncouple it from the driven member 43. This exemplifies means for automatically coupling the motor to the driving mechanism when the motor is started and uncoupling the motor therefrom when the motor stops, so that the motor will, except during the lifting operation, be uncoupled from the lifting mechanism.

The shade is held in raised position by a brake or holding-means which comprises a grooved drum or pulley 5| fixed to shaft 44 and a brakeshoe 52 pivotally supported at 53. A solenoid magnet 54 has its armature connected by a link 55 to brake-shoe 52 to shift the shoe to release the drum 5|. The shoe is normally held by gravity against the drum 5| or may be so held by a spring 52. The magnet 54 is controlled by means hereinafter described.

Means for automatically controlling the operation of the motor to cause it to stop when the shade has been raised comprises a screw 51 on shaft 38, a nut 58 threaded to said screw and suitably held against rotation and a high-limit switch 59 which is opened by an adjustable screw on nut 58. A low-limit switch 68 is adapted to be opened by an adjustable screw on said nut when the'shade is lowered.

The invention also comprises means for automatically controlling the raising and lowering of the shade by weather conditions'such as changes in temperature or light. For automatically controlling the raising and lowering of the shade by temperature, a thermostat 62 is provided in a suitable semi-spherical shell 82 which is placed in position to be exposed to heat from the sun. The mechanism for raising and lowering the shade and the electrical control devices are preferably enclosed in a box 63 placed adjacent the top of the window-frame l5 and over the shade. This switch-mechanism comprises a double throw-switch lever J88; a pair of switch contacts 88 adapted to be bridged by lever I88 and an associated pair of contacts 64 adapted to be simultaneously bridged by said lever for setting the control for automatic operation; a pair of switch contacts 61 adapted to be bridged by lever I88 for manual control of the shade; a push-button switch 85 for manually controlling the raising of the shade, and a push-button switch 65 for manually controlling the lowering of the shade. When the lever I88 is in its neutral position, both the manual and automatic controls are inoperative. When lever I88 is shifted to close circuits through contacts 84, 68, respectively, the shade will be automatically controlled by the thermostat 62. When lever |88 is shifted to close a circuit through contacts 61, the shade will be manually controlled by switches 65, 85. The control mechanism also comprises an electromagnet 69 for conjointly controlling a group of normally-open switches 78, ll, 12 and a normallyclosed switch 13. Magnet 54, which controls the brake 52, operates a switch 84. A transformer 18, 18 is provided to reduce the voltage in the line connected to motor 4| for the control circuits.

When the shade is to be automatically controlled, the lever 88 will be set to close circuits through switch-contacts 88 and 64, respectively. Electric motor 4| is inclined in a circuit between the line wires 16 and 11 in which is included the normally-open switch I8. Assuming the shade to be lowered and the temperature changes sufflciently to actuate thermostate 82 and shift it to the left in response to sufllcient lowering of temperature to make it desirable to raise the shade, a control circuit will be established as follows: transformer-coil l8, conductor I8, switch-contacts 68, conductor 88, switch-contacts 84, conductor 8|, thermostat 62, conductor 81 in which the helix of magnet 88 is included, high-limit switch 59 and conductor 83. This circuit will energize magnet 69 and shift its associate group of switches, including switch 18, which will close the line-circuit through the motor 5| to cause the motor to operate. Simultaneously, the following circuit will be established through magnet 54 to cause it to release the normally-set brake 5?, viz: transformer-coil I8, conductor 85, switch 12, conductor 86, and the conductor 83 in which the helix of magnet 54 is included. When the helix of magnet 68 is energized, it will also close switch II to provide the following circuit for keeping magnet 69 energized independently of the thermostat, viz: conductor 1|, switch 1|, conductor 'H conductor 81, in which the helix of magnet 68 is included, and high-limit switch 59. This circuit will be interrupted at the highlimit switch 58 when the shade is fully raised.

Brake 52 will be held released and the motor 4| will, through the' lifting mechanism .wind up the tapes 38 to raise the shade until the nut 58 opens the high-limit switch 59. When the shade has been raised and limit-switch 58 has been opened by nut 58, the circuit through magnet 58 will be interrupted at said switch and thiswill open the motor-circuit at switch 18. It will also interrupt the circuit for the brake-releasing magnet 54 at switch 12. The brake will then be applied to the lifting mechanism to hold the shade raised and the motor will be automatically uncoupled from the lifting mechanism. When the temperature rises to make it desirable to lower the shade, thermostat 62 will be operated to close the following circuit, viz: transformer-coil l8, conductor I8, switch-contacts 58, conductor 88, switch-contacts S4, conductor 8|, thermostat 82, conductor 88, low-limit switch 68 and conductor 83, in which the helix of magnet 54 is included. This will energize magnet 54, which will release the brake to permit the shade to fall by gravity, the motor then remaining uncoupled from the lifting mechanism and magnet will simultaneously close switch 84. As. a result of closing switch 84, a circuit will be established to keep magnet 54 energized until the shade has been lowered and low-limit switch 68 is opened by nut 58. The circuit for keeping magnet 54 energized during this lowering cycle independently of thermostat 62 will ,be as follows: conductor 88, conductor 88, switch 13, conductor 98, switch 84, conductor 82, low-limit switch 68 and conductor 83 in which the helix of magnet 54 is included. When the low-limit switch 88 is opened, the last-described circuit will be opened to deenergize magnet 54 and to set the brake.

When it is desired to manually control the operation.- of motor 4| to lift the shade, the switch-lever I88 will be shifted to cut out contacts 84, 68 and close switch-contacts 61 so that magnets 69 and 54 can be controlled from pushbuttons 65, 86 independently of the thermostat. When it'is desired to raise the shade, push-button switch 65 will be closed, which will establish the following circuit: transformer-coil 18, conductor 18; switch-contacts 61, conductor |8|,

push-button switch 65, conductors |82,'8|, magnet 58, and high-limit switch 59, so the magnet 75 Simultaneously, a circuit for releasing the brake will be established as follows: conductors i9, 85, switch 12, conductor iifi'and conductor 83, in which the helix of magnet 54 is included. When the up-button is released, the motor will stop and the brake will be set, unless the switch-button is kept depressed until the shade reaches its high limit, at which time the circuit will be interrupted by the high-limit switch 59.

when it is desired to lower the shade under manual control, the push-button switch 66 will be closed to establish a circuit as follows: transformer-coil l8, conductor I04, switch 66, conductor 88, low-limit switch 60 and conductor 83, in which the helix of magnet 54 is included, so that the brake will be released and permit the shade to be lowered by gravity until the switch 66 is released or until the low-limit switch 60 is opened by a nut 58. By means of switches 65, 66, the shade may be partially raised or lowered to any desired extent or to any desired intermediate position between the high and low limits. When switch 61' is closed, switch-contacts 64 and 68 will be open to cut out the circuits for holding the circuits for the magnets 69 and 6t closed until they are opened by the high and low-limit switches.

Fig. 11 illustrates a modified form of the invention in which a photoelectric or light-sensitive cell 92, which is exposed to sunlight, is used for controlling the shade in lieu of a thermostat. This cell is supplied with current from a battery 93 in a circuit which includes a helix 94. Helix 94 operates a switch 95 which is connected in a circuit which includes a battery 96 and the helix 91 of a magnet which is adapted to operate a switch 88. Switch 98 controls circuits the same as heretofore described in connection with the thermostat, the contacts of said switch being connected to conductors 88, 8| and 81 as shown. In

this modification the cell 92 is actuated by sun light to operate the magnet 94 to close the circuit for the magnet 9'! which will operate the switch 98 to establish circuits through conductor claims without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.v

Having thus described the invention, what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In combination a motor for raising a shade.

an automatic brake for holding the shade raised.

1 mechanism means holding said mechanism to hold the shade and means for conjointly controlling the motor and the brake.

2. In combination a motor for raising a shade, an automatic brake for holding the shade raised, means for automatically and conjointly controlling the motor' and brake, and manually'controlled electrical means for controlling the motor and brake.

3. In combination mechanism for raising and lowering a shade, a motor for operating said mechanism normally disconnected therefrom, means holding said mechanism to hold the shade in raised position, and electrical means for controlling the motor to operate said mechanism to raise the shade and release the holding-means while the motor is operating and for releasing the holding-means to lower the shade while the motor is inoperative.

4. In combination a vertical series of pivoted vanes, mechanism for raising and lowering the shade, a motor for operating said mechanism normally disconnected therefrom, means for holding the mechanism to hold the vanes in raised position, and electrical means for controlling the motor to operate said mechanism to raise the vanes and release the holding-means while the motor is operating and for releasing the holdingmeans to lower the vanes while the motor is inoperative.

5. In combination mechanism for raising and lowering the shade, a motor for operating said mechanism normally disconnected therefrom, means for holding the shade in raised position, and electrical meansfor controlling the motor to operate said mechanism to raise the shade and release the holding-means while the motor is operating and for releasing the holding-means to lower the shade while the motor is inoperative.

6. In combination mechanism for raising and lowering a shade, a motor for operating said normally disconnected therefrom.

in raised position, and automatically controlled electrical means for controlling the motor to operate said mechanism to raise the shade and release the holding-means while the motor is operating and for releasing the holding-means to lower the shade while the motor is inoperative.

7. In combination mechanism for raising and lowering a shade, a motor for operating said mechanism normally disconnected therefrom, means holding said mechanism to hold the shade in raised position, and automatically and manually controlled electrical means for controlling the motor to operate said mechanism to raise the shade and release the holding-means while the motor is operating and for releasing the holding-means to lower the shade while the motor is inoperative.

EDWARD VAN BOSCH. REINHOLD H. HOFFMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2489879 *Oct 22, 1945Nov 29, 1949John J GrebeThermal responsive venetian blind
US2551917 *Oct 17, 1947May 8, 1951Whitfield Robert FAwning
US2574729 *Jul 15, 1949Nov 13, 1951Coffman Clifford CRemote-control blind operator for motor vehicles
US2738005 *Oct 19, 1951Mar 13, 1956Jules NisensonVenetian blind construction
US2980970 *May 5, 1958Apr 25, 1961Lemlar Mfg Company IncRemote control for vane positioner
US3042001 *Nov 2, 1959Jul 3, 1962Orville L DubieAutomatic poultry curtain raiser
US3134427 *Dec 4, 1959May 26, 1964Landenberger EugenVenetian blind
US3249148 *Jun 26, 1962May 3, 1966Ronald J ZablodilAutomatic venetian blinds
US3294150 *Dec 20, 1963Dec 27, 1966Thomas GeorgeSunblinds for greenhouses or the like
US3294151 *Oct 5, 1964Dec 27, 1966Berry John DAutomatic electric awning
US3390251 *Oct 22, 1965Jun 25, 1968Joshua D. LowenfishHeating device
US3429298 *Jun 23, 1966Feb 25, 1969James Philip ThomasonPoultry house curtain raiser
US3474761 *Jan 22, 1968Oct 28, 1969James Philip ThomasonPoultry house curtain controller
US3487875 *Jan 23, 1968Jan 6, 1970Tudoran Tradeshop IncSelf-operating drapery
US3665996 *Dec 8, 1969May 30, 1972Rixson IncClosure operator
US4492908 *Feb 17, 1983Jan 8, 1985International Standard Electric CorporationApparatus for synchronizing the slats of motor driven window blinds
US4644990 *Sep 3, 1985Feb 24, 1987William F. DunnAutomatic closing system for window blinds
US4664169 *Feb 5, 1981May 12, 1987Rca CorporationVenetian blind construction
US4727919 *Nov 7, 1985Mar 1, 1988NergecoSafety and emergency actuator device for a concertina type door
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US6038816 *Jul 12, 1999Mar 21, 2000Hansung Special Glass Co., Ltd.Blinder
US6112798 *Jul 2, 1999Sep 5, 2000Cheng; Keng MuManual/auto dual driving mode transmission mechanism for a vertical blind
US6470951 *Nov 20, 2000Oct 29, 2002Hsiu-Chih TaoStructure of a blind adjustment
US7941245May 10, 2011Pradeep Pranjivan PopatState-based system for automated shading
US8708024Jun 14, 2013Apr 29, 2014Russell L. Hinckley, Sr.Methods for operating window covers
US8720525Jun 14, 2013May 13, 2014Russell L. Hinckley, Sr.Methods for operating window covers
US8887788Jun 14, 2013Nov 18, 2014Russell L. Hinckley, SR.Methods for operating window covers
US9316051May 29, 2014Apr 19, 2016Russell L. Hinckley, SR.Window cover system with spring drive arrangement
US9328554Jun 1, 2015May 3, 2016Russell L. Hinckley, SR.Spring drive systems for window covers
US9359814Jun 1, 2015Jun 7, 2016Russel L. HinckleySystems for maintaining window covers
US20090199975 *Feb 8, 2008Aug 13, 2009Wei-Cheng YehElectric roman shade
US20090242145 *Mar 30, 2008Oct 1, 2009Sheu Jia YihMotorized shade assembly with reduced vibration and noise
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/168.10P, 160/176.10P, 160/DIG.500, 188/75, 160/172.00R, 160/5, 160/DIG.170
International ClassificationE05F15/20
Cooperative ClassificationY10S160/17, E05F15/2007, Y10S160/05
European ClassificationE05F15/20B