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Publication numberUS2149514 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 7, 1939
Filing dateFeb 25, 1937
Priority dateFeb 25, 1937
Publication numberUS 2149514 A, US 2149514A, US-A-2149514, US2149514 A, US2149514A
InventorsCharles Fischer
Original AssigneeCharles Fischer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Goggles
US 2149514 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. FISCHER GOGGLES March 7, 1939.

Filed Feb. 25, 1937 nlv'l-:Nrolal l Char/es Fischerv #YM-m ArroRNEY Patented Mar. 7, 1939 3 Claims.

The invention relates to improvements in goggles and has particularly to do with that type of goggle used by aviators, drivers of racing automobiles, motor boats or any other apparatus where a high speed is maintained.

The present invention has to do with ventilating means for goggles and has for one of its objects to provide a Ventilating arrangement, whereby fogging of the inner surface of the lens members and, consequent, blurring of the vision of the wearer, is avoided.

It has been found in practice that when the aviators head is placed in some unusual position, either due to his own movement or movement of `the plane, the Ventilating means will defeat their own purpose and cause the l-ens members to fog. In accordance with the present invention it is impossible for this .annoying and ofttimes dangerous condition to exist.

This application is renewal in part of my abandoned application, Serial No. 622,200, filed July 13, 1932.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the specification proceeds. Referring to the drawing forming a part thereof:

Fig. l is a front elevation of the goggle embodying the improvements of the present invention with parts broken away and parts in section;

Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional View taken on line 2--2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary elevation showing one of the air-entraining tubes;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary elevation showing the air inlet orifices in the frame;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a modif-led form of an air-entraining tube; and

Fig. '7 is a perspective view of a throttle member for the inlet of the air-entering tube.

The goggle includes a pad lli composed of soft rubber, provided with eye-openings ll, and adapted to efficiently and comfortably conform to the face of the wearer. Surrounding the eye openings and secured to the pad are light metal frames l2, hinged together at I3, and adapted to carry the lens members i4. The frames may be split to permit of the ready insertion or removal of the lens members and pad and when so split they are provided with clamping means indicated at i5. If desired the body of the frame may be one piece, a clamping frame utilized to hold the lens in position, and the pad sewed or otherwise secured to the frame.

The lower wall of each frame is punched to provide a plurality of inwardly depressed portions 2Q and orifices '21, the latter being adapted to serve as air inlets (see Figs. 1,2 and 5). The depressed portions Zil rise gradually toward the front of each frame and form hoods which serve to direct air forwardly toward the lens carried 'in each frame.

The upper wall of each frame is also punched to provide an outwardly pressed portion or hood z. 22 and a vent 23 (see Figs. 2 and 4). The vent 23 in each frame communicates with the passage ways 2A of an air-entraining tube 25 carried on the outer surface of each frame.

Each air-entraining tube is provided with an air inlet 26 and an outlet 2l. The inlet is in the forward part of the tube and opens outwardly and is formed by having a part of the forward end adjoining iront wall cut away. The outlet 2'! is in the rear part of the tube and opens .in-

.far-dly and is formed by having a part of the rear end and adjoining lower wall cut away. This construction is of primary importance as it always insures against any possibility of the air entering the outlet instead of the inlet, regardless of the position of the head of the wearer, and thus interfering with the proper functioning of the Ventilating system. The cross-sectional area of they passageway 2li preferably increases from its inlet to its outlet end. The outside air passes at high velocity through this passage 2li and entrains the air in the eye cup and carries it through the outlet of the passage.

A modified form of entraining tube is illustrated in Fig. 6. As in the tube previously described, part of the forward end and adjoining front wall is cut away to provide an inlet 26a. At its other end the tube is bent to provide a rearwardly extending horn,- the mouth of which serves as a rearwardly facing outlet 2121.

if desired means may also be provided for controlling the admission of air to the inlets of the entraining -tube to regulate the iiow of air through the eye cup.

These means comprise a throttle member mov ably mounted on each frame. As shown in Fig. 7, each throttle member comprises a flat plate Si), which, at its forward end is turned up to provide the vertical plate 3 l The vertical portion 3i can be used to partially or entirely block the inlet of the entraining tube of a frame. The throttle is preferably pivotallymounted on each frame by means of a` pin 32 which is passed through the upper surface of each frame. When the throttle member is open and it is desired to diminish the flow of air through the goggle, the throttle is swung into position over the inlet openings of the tubes, the vertically extending plates 3 I, serving as a finger-piece, whereby the throttle can be easily reached and manipulated.

Jets of air entering the goggle through the orifices at 2| will be deflected forwardly toward the lens members of the frames and will not strike directly against the face and eyes of the wearer. Hoods 20, adjacent the orices, also prevent the entry of rain, dirt, or other particles to the interior of the goggle. The air admitted is drawn through the goggle and discharged through vents 23 by the passage of air ythrough the entraining tubes, with which the vents communicate. The arrangement of the tube outlets to face rearwardly insures the unimpeded discharge of air from the goggle and the throttle members permit the ow of air through the goggle to be regulated. Air can thus be constantly circulated through the goggle in a regulated and unretarded stream and condensation on the inner surface of the lens members and consequent, fogging or blurring of vision, is avoided.

It will be understood that, in carrying the in,- vention into practice, changes may be made in the improvements, described, without departing from the principle thereof.

I claim:

1. Means for Ventilating goggles comprising, a metal frame formed with inlet orifices in its lower wall, hoods in they frame adjacent the orifices for directing air toward the front of the frame, a hooded vent in the upper wall of the frame, and an air-entraining tube of U-shaped cross-section mounted on the upper wall of the frame, the airentraining tube having an inlet in the forward part thereof which opens outwardly, said inlet being formed by slabbing oi said tube from the median line thereof to a point along the front wall of said tube so that part of the forward end and adjoining front wall of the tube are cut away, and an outlet in the rear part of the tube which opens inwardly, said outlet being formed by slabbing off said tube from the median line thereof to a point along the lower wall of said tube so that a. part of the rear end and adjoining lower wall of the tube are cut away, the frame vent communicating with said air-entraining tube.

2. Means for Ventilating goggles comprising, a metal frame formed with inlet orifices in its lower wall, hoods in the frame adjacent the orices for directing alr toward the front of the frame, a hooded vent in the upper wall of the frame, an air-entraining tube mounted on the upper wall of the frame, the air-entraining tube having an inlet in the forward part thereof which opens outwardly and an outlet in the rear pant thereof which opens inwardly, the frame Vent communicating with said air-entraining tube, and a throttle member pivotally mounted on the frame adjacent the tube inlet, said member being operable to close or open the tube inlet.

3. In a goggle combination provided with a means for Ventilating goggles comprising a metal frame formed with inlet orices in its lower wall, hoods in the frame adjacent the orifices for directing air currents toward the front of the frame adjacent the lenses, a hooded vent in the upper wall of the frame, an air-entraining tube covering the said hooded Vent and in operative relationship therewith, the said entraining tube having an inlet in the forward part thereof which opens outwardly in a direction away from the face of the wearer, and an outlet of greater cross section than the said inlet, the said outlet being directed rearwardly toward the face of the wearer and in opposite direction to the said inlet.

CHARLES FISCHER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2612639 *Jun 8, 1949Oct 7, 1952Christensen William RClosed goggles structure
US2615162 *Jun 8, 1949Oct 28, 1952Christensen William RCold weather goggles
US2654090 *Jun 8, 1949Oct 6, 1953Christensen William RLens ventilation in goggles structure
US2981957 *Dec 15, 1958May 2, 1961Hirschmann Jack BWelding goggle
US4122847 *Jul 25, 1977Oct 31, 1978Craig Robert GProtective eye shield for surgical patients
US7188946Sep 19, 2005Mar 13, 2007Sharklids Eyegear, LlcEyewear
US7275819Jan 20, 2004Oct 2, 2007Sharklids Eyegear, LlcEyewear
US20040218140 *Jan 20, 2004Nov 4, 2004Bleau Michael JamesNovel eyewear
US20060070161 *Sep 19, 2005Apr 6, 2006Sharklids Eyegear, Inc.Novel eyewear
US20090303430 *Jun 9, 2008Dec 10, 2009Joseph Allen GregoryWind powered sport goggles
US20110258758 *Oct 27, 2011Salomon S.A.S.Protective mask for the practice of outdoor sports
USRE32638 *Mar 12, 1986Apr 12, 1988 Goggle
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/436
International ClassificationA61F9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61F9/028
European ClassificationA61F9/02V