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Publication numberUS2149742 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 7, 1939
Filing dateAug 10, 1937
Priority dateAug 10, 1937
Publication numberUS 2149742 A, US 2149742A, US-A-2149742, US2149742 A, US2149742A
InventorsWalter E Miller
Original AssigneeWalter E Miller
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Trim
US 2149742 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 7, 1939. w. E. MILLER TRIM Filed Aug. 10, 1957 Watented arr. Z

,ier

Walter E.

Application Act 10,

This invention relates to trim for building interiors and the like.

The principal object of this invention is to provide trim of the character described which is inexpensive and easily applied.

Another object of the invention is to provide trim of such flexibility as to facilitate bending around corners, curves, or irregular contours, without the unsightly breaks or cuts which usually appear when wood trim is used.

Another object of the invention is to provide trim which is elastic or resilient and will yield and be self-adjusting as a building settles or as building parts expand or contract under temperature changes, thereby obviating cracks.

Another object of the invention is to provide trim which may be c'oiled or packed into comparatively small space for storage or transportation.

Another object of the invention. is to provid trim which may be secured in position for use by brads, tacks or other such means without the latter showing on the exposed surface of the trim.

These and other objects of the invention will be manifest from the following brief description thereof and the accompanying drawing.

Of the accompanying drawing:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a length of trim embodying the invention.

Figure 2 is a cross-section at an inside corner of a building interior illustrating an application of the trim shown in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a view, similar to Figure 1, of another embodiment of the invention.

Figure 4 is a. cross-section illustrating an application of the trim shown in Figure 3 as edge finishing material.

Figure 5 is a view, similar to Figure 1, illustrating another type of corner trim embodying the invention.

Figure 6 is a cross-section illustrating an application of the trim shown in Figure 5.

Figure 7 is a view, similar to Figure 1, of a length of outside comer trim embodying the invention.

Figure 8 is a cross-section illustrating an application of the trim shown in Figure 7.

Referring to Figures 1 and 2 of the drawing, I0 designates inside corner finishing trim of flexible, elastic material, such as vulcanized rubber, preferably having a curved or otherwise shaped exterior wall II. Adjacent a margin of the wall II, there may be an inwardly extending flange I2. The region along which the wall II and flange I2 are joined is preferably relatively 1' i 1 er, Columbus, Ohio 1937, Serial No. 158,358

thin to permit a hinging action of wall II about flange I2, as shown in chain-dotted lines in Figure 2. The improved material, because of this hinging action between the walls thereof will flex more easily than a solid trim and adapts itself more readily to uneven surfaces where applied. The improved material may be adhesively secured in place and may be effectively nailed as will be described. Usually it will be nailed only at joints or ends to insure against separation or loosening. It may be stretched to considerable extent and also compressed somewhat to facilitate fitting a strip of the material in place. If desired, the brads, nails, tacks, etc. may be driven through wall II and flange I2 to the flooring I4, the nails being punched through wall II in such a manner that the wall I I pulls or snaps free from the nails due to the resiliency of the material in the wall I I, causing the latter to spring back to its normal vulcanized shape. The holes made in wall II by passage of fastening means I3 therethrough close and become invisible due to the resiliency of the material. When trim I0 is secured in position by any of the above means the hollow spaces may be more or less filled with the adhesive cement used. To obtain a neat tight joint, the contacting corners of trim I0 may be provided with lips I li I0, which are flexed under pressure against the surfaces where applied.

In Figures 3 and 4 are shown trim I5, which may be applied in substantially the same manner as above, for use as anedge finishing strip as for example for covering exposed edges on wall or floor covering such as oil cloth, linoleum, etc.

Figures 5 and 6 illustrate the use of similar trim material 16 for finishing inside corners around bath tubs, wash basins, sink drain-boards, and the like, applied in substantially the same manner as the trim material I0. (See Figure 6.)

In Figures 7 and 8 the trim I'I comprises an exterior wall l8 having a pair of inwardly extending marginal edges I9, I9. The edges I9 may be provided with lips I 9* I 9 as in the other embodiments of the invention. An integral fiange or flanges 20, 20 may be hingedly con nected inside the wall I8 intermediate the marginal edges I9, I9, so that either of said edges may be turned outwardly for the purpose of applying fastening means. The trim material I! is adapted to be used either as an edging or trim strip or as a guard or bumper for outside corners of sink drain-boards, shelving, desk tops, etc. When the trim I1 is secured in position, the hollow spaces may be filled with the adhesive. cement.

From the foregoing brief description it will be seen that trim material, for architectural and other purposes, made in accordance with this invention is easy to apply and readily conforms to irregular surfaces. Tl'ie outer flange will move toward and from the inner flange in flexing the strip into contact with convex and concave surfaces respectively leaving a smooth neat exterior trim surface. It will adapt itself to settling and other shifting of building structures, and is neat because of the absence of unsightly cracks or exposed portions of fastening means. Furthermore, this improved trim material may be coiled into relatively small space either for storage purposes or for transporting it in quantity.

Modifications may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. Trim for corners formed by intersection of surfaces, said trim comprising an integral strip of flexible elastic material formed substantially to the profile required in use and having integral flanges extending in spaced relation to each other, including an inner flange for lying along a surface adjacent said corner and adapted to be secured to said surface and an outer flange which extends beyond and conceals said inner flange by extending to and contacting with a surface adjacent said corner, said material flexing without buckling of the exposed flange because of the space between said flanges.

2. Trim for corners formed by intersection of surfaces, said trim comprising an integral strip of flexible elastic material formed substantially to the profile required in use and having integral flanges extending in spaced relation to each other, including an inner flange for lying along a surface adjacent said corner and adapted to be secured to said surface and an outer flange .which spans said corner and conceals said inner flange by extending beyond said flange and contacting with a surface adjacent said corner, said material flexing without buckling of the exposed flange because of the space between said flanges.

3. Trim of the character described comprising a strip of flexible elastic material formed with spaced flanges merging and integral with each other at a vertex, one of said flanges being arranged to lie along a wall surface and to be fastened to said surface, the other flange extending beyond the first-named flange and to a surface adjacent thereto when the first-named flange is so fastened, said strip material being capable of flexing or bending into contact with irregular or curved surfaces and attachment thereto without buckling, the outer flange covering the fastened inner flange and being capable of being drawn inwardly toward the inner flange in flexing the strip into contact with convex surfaces and of moving away from the inner flange in flexing the strip into contact with concave surfaces whereby the exterior of the trim when applied will be of smooth, even, neat appearance.

WALTER E. MILLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2541768 *Jul 3, 1948Feb 13, 1951Keller Kenneth MFlexible molding strip
US2620524 *Nov 1, 1947Dec 9, 1952Robert Bright Thomas JohnWeather strip
US2857229 *Nov 4, 1954Oct 21, 1958Aurora Equipment CoLocker support
US2894298 *Dec 26, 1956Jul 14, 1959Woodall Industries IncMatching and supporting strip for headliner panels
US3203517 *Feb 15, 1963Aug 31, 1965Leo SteinMeans for protectively concealing the stitching of articles
US3469357 *May 19, 1967Sep 30, 1969Seidler MigdonioGravel stop construction
US3638374 *Jan 12, 1970Feb 1, 1972Harby Ltd BernardWall base member
US5836134 *Feb 21, 1995Nov 17, 1998Boston Metal Products Corp.Protective bumper railing
US6125605 *Apr 3, 1998Oct 3, 2000Young; Robert H.Cladding for trim members used on buildings
US7712263 *Aug 2, 2004May 11, 2010Randall LippieBird repellant device
US7937896 *Mar 11, 2010May 10, 2011Lippie Randall CBird repellant device
US20100215888 *May 23, 2008Aug 26, 2010Ronald HorsmanBorder
EP0394036A1 *Apr 19, 1990Oct 24, 1990Aidan Simon BruceTrim strip
WO1993006319A1 *Sep 17, 1992Apr 1, 1993Philip Nigel MorganFlooring and edging member for use therein
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/717.3, D25/119, 280/169, 49/496.1, 220/DIG.300
International ClassificationE04F19/02
Cooperative ClassificationY10S220/03, E04F19/02
European ClassificationE04F19/02