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Publication numberUS2150057 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 7, 1939
Filing dateMay 5, 1938
Priority dateJan 8, 1938
Publication numberUS 2150057 A, US 2150057A, US-A-2150057, US2150057 A, US2150057A
InventorsArthur Fisch
Original AssigneeArthur Fisch
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe sole
US 2150057 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 7, 1939. A. FISCH 2,150,057

SHOE SOLE Filed May 5, 1938 A lil: 1

Jiu/enf ar AI zlr fisc/5 Patented Mar. 7,1939

UNITED STATES,

SHOE

SOLE

Arthur Fisch, Heidelberg, Germany Application May 5, 1938, Serial No. 206,244

Germany January 8, 1938 .8 Claims.

' The invention relates to footwear and has for an object to provide improvements therein which render the footwear particularly comfortable.

Normal boots'and shoes incorporate rigid supporting means to support the arches of the foot, which, however, often break through after a short wearing or lose their form in some Way, so that they are no longer a help but rather the cause of much discomfort.

The natural rolling of the foot from the heel to the tip can only be ensured by a sole which bears correctly against the foot and gives complete liberty of movement to the foot. Thereby the sinews and the ligaments of the foot and leg bones which carry out their natural functions are reinforced and remain elastic and are then capable of their maximum effort. To come as near as possible to this ideal state is the aim of the invention. Particularly, the invention seeks to provide improvements in house shoes which usually do not allow rigid supports and heels, as for example in cosy shoes and slippers, due to the nature of the material from which they are manufactured; hitherto it has been tried to overcome these inconveniences by omitting the heels and supports for the ankles, which have been found extremely disadvantageous for the wearer.

The invention overcomes these defects by the arrangements described below.

A sole carried out in accordance with the invention, from rubber or similar material, is represented in the accompanying diagrammatic drawing by way of example, in which:

Figure 1 shows the rubber sole in section on the line I-I of Figure 2. A

Figure 2 is a view of the rubber sole in top plan with the upper covering removed.

Figure 3 shows the sole in section on the,lii'1e\` III-HI of Figures l and 2 after the uppe has been attached.

Figure 4 shows the sewing-on edge with an upper sewn on in the initial position to the sole.

Figure 5 shows the sewing edge after the turning of the upper.

In accordance with the invention the sole co'nsists in the following parts: The heel a, the arch support b, the metatarsal arch support c and the toe part d. The heel a is composed elastically of hollow cells I, 'and is comfortable to the foot.

The arch support b has at its under side a number of integral studs or projections 2,i and on its upper side comprises arch supporting ribs l3, which are formed resiliently, being integral ribs of rubber. The metatarsal arch support c which conforms to the natural arch of the foot (Cl. 36-29) l is also, as can be seen at 4, elastically sub-divided by Webs. The studs or projections 2 bear on the ground during walking and assist in lengthening the life of the sole. As the studs are separate from one another, they in no way prevent the sole from flexing as required by the act of walking. The toe of the sole is also made more resilient by webforming cells 5, whilst between this part and the commencement of the arch support c the sole is formed at its inner surface with;

transverse corrugations 6. 'Ihese corrugations 6, as shown in Figure 2, also extend along one side of the sole to where the heel part a commences leaving the webs 3 and 4 for supporting the longitudinal and metatarsal arches of the foot, which latter is shown in Figure 3. The sole is provided at its upper surface with a resilient covering or insertion I2, which by virtue of the formation above described, assumes a shape natural to the foot and enables it to' obtain a proper grip during walking.

The stable heel a brings `the foot in its normall position and results, in connection with the ex .Y

ternal support 2, the longitudinal arch support 3, the metatarsal arch support 4 and the elastic bearing 5 of the toe part-contrary to the hitherto known form and manner of manufacture of cosy shoes and slippersin a favourable mounting of the foot in all respects whereby the above mentioned defects are eliminated.

The arrangements in accordance' with the invention are also applicable advantageously in other types of manufacture, for example in shoes which are sewn throughout and in which the upper worked with 'its margin turned outwardly while on a last so that a ange is created to which the tread sole is thenl sewed, and also in shoes provided with unvulcanized soles. The inner' surface of the rubber sole which faces the foot, with the exception of the sewing-on margin 1, is provided with hollow spaces, in order to give to the foot a soft smooth resting to favour the airing and to reduce the weight.

The making of shoes with heel and arch supportscannot generally be -carried out in accordance with the known method of sewing on the sole portion-to the upper portion without the employment of complicated and expensive machinery. In the present invention, the attachment of the outer sole, which is provided with heel and arch supports, is effected with parts outturnedA and the upper inside out and the shoe is turned right side out after sewing which enables the sewing on of the upper of the shoe to be accomplished with the simplest sewing machine. This is accomplished by placing'the sole upon the sewing machine with its foot-contacting surface facing upward (Figure 4). The laterally extending sewing-on margin rests then entirely flat upon the sewing table. Afterwards the upper of the shoe is while turned inside out connected with the sewing-on edge, the juxtaposition of thesewing-on edge and the upper is such that onlythe sewing-on edge andupper come in contact with the pressing foot and the feeder of the machine. The raised parts, such as heels, arch supports etc. do not come in contact at all with the sewing device itself. Then the upper 1s turned inside out. (See Fig. 5.)

Hitherto, because of the sewing methods used, heavy weight materials have been necessary. In the arrangement of the present invention, however, any weight material may be employed in view of the position of the sewing-on margin with respect to the machine.

A special advantage of the carrying out of the seaming edge in accordance with the present invention consists in the fact that the upper of the boot here can be fastened by the simplest-stitching operation.

Moreover, this sole prevents'the bulge at the bottom of the shoe seen in the usual turn-shoe work which leads to foot troubles. Furthermore, this sole prevents the flat resting of the foot, leading to fiat feet, which ordinarily results from the lack of a heel. Usually when there is no heel, the weight is thrown backwards when the foot is at rest. The disadvantages brought about by the shifting' of the weight are not removed by the mere insertion of a wedge underneath the heel. For although the wedge lessensA some of the shifting of weight, it nevertheless permits the longitudinal arch of the foot to swing freely without any support, s'o that the arch falls.

All these disadvantages are overcome by the sole formed in accordance with the present invention.

I claim: Y

1. For footwear a combined sole and heel formed from rubber and comprising a heel portion, a shank portion and a sole portion, upwardly and a metatarsal arch support conforming to the natural arch of the foot and being sub-fdivided by webs extending from the arch supportbto the 2. For footwear a combined sole and heel formed from rubber and comprising a heel por-A tion, a shank portion and a sole portion, upwardly directed ribs formed on the heel portion and the shank portion to provide an air cushion thereover, and a pluralityof downwardly directed vstuds formed integrally upon the shank portion and arranged with their extremities disposed substantially in co-planar relationship to the under surface of thesole and the heel portions, the toe portion of the sole having upwardly directed ribs formed integrally thereon to constitute an aircushion, said ribs being graduated in height from a maximum at the end portion rearwardly, whereby the toe of the wearer is resiliently supported in an elevated position.

3. For footwear a combined sole and heel formed from rubber and comprising a. heel portion, a shank portion and a sole portion, upwardly directed ribs fonned lon the heel portion and the shankportion to provide an air cushion tion, ay shank portion and asole portion, the

lower surface of which latter is substantially fiat, upwardly directed ribs formed on the front of the sole portion to provide an air cushion serving to elevate the wearers toes, a plurality of downwardly directed studs formed integrally upon the shank portion and arranged with their extremities disposed substantially in the same plane as the lower surface of the fiat sole portion, and a metatarsal arch support conforming to the natural arch of the foot and being sub-divided by webs extending from the arch support to the sole.

5. For footwear a combined sole and heel formed from rubber and comprising a. heel portion, a shank portion and a sole portion, the lower surface of which latter is substantially flat, upwardly directed ribs formed on the front of the sole portion toprovide an air cushion serving to elevate the wearers toes, and a plurality of downwardly directed studs formed integrally upon the shank portion and arranged with their extremities disposed substantially in the same plane as the lower surface of the flat sole portion, the inner surfacelof ,the sole provided with transverse corrugations extending along one side of the sole to where the heel part commences.

6. For footwear a combined sole Aand heel formed from rubber and comprising a heel portion, a shank portion and a sole portion, the lower surface of which latter is substantially fiat, upwardly directed ribs formed on the front of the sole portion lto provide an air cushion serving to elevate the wearers toes, a plurality of downwardly directed studs formed integrally upon the shank portion and arranged withtheir extremities disposed'substantially in the same plane as the lower surface of the flat sole portion, a longitudinal arch support and a metatarsal arch support conformingy to the natural arch 'of the foot and being sub-divided by webs forming `cells and extending from the metatarsal arch support to where the heel commences.

"I. For` footwear a combined sole and heel formed from rubber and comprising a heel portion, a shank portion and a sole portion,`the lower surface of which latter is substantially dat. upwardly directed ribs formed on the front of the sole portion to provide an air cushion serving to elevate the wearers toes, and a plurality of downwardly directed studs formed integrally upon the shank portion and arranged with their extremities disposed substantially in the same plane as the lower surface of the dat sole portion, the inner surface of the sole provided with transverse corrugations extending along one side of the sole to where the heel part commences, the heel part and the shank portion having resilient websconsisting of cells.

8. For footwear a combined sole and heel formed from rubber and comprising a heel portion, a shank portion andt a sole portion, the

' to resiiiently support the wearers ts in an elevated position, and a plurality of downwardly directed studs formed integrally upon the arch support and arranged with their extremities disposed substantially in the same plane as the lower surface of the at sole portion.

ARTHUR FISCI-I.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2978818 *Sep 17, 1958Apr 11, 1961Bama Werk Curt Baumann FaMetatarsal foot supports
US3079707 *Dec 14, 1959Mar 5, 1963Colman Benjamin WResilient shoe soles
US3129520 *Dec 19, 1960Apr 21, 1964Herbert FunckOne-piece molded sole for welt shoes
US3142912 *Jul 24, 1961Aug 4, 1964Owe Larsen TrulsDevices for circulating air in footwear
US4235026 *Sep 13, 1978Nov 25, 1980Motion Analysis, Inc.Elastomeric shoesole
US4297797 *Dec 18, 1978Nov 3, 1981Meyers Stuart RTherapeutic shoe
US4445283 *Oct 10, 1980May 1, 1984Synapco Ltd.Footwear sole member
US4739765 *Jun 26, 1986Apr 26, 1988Bio Balance Orthotics Inc.Arch support
US5718063 *Jun 17, 1996Feb 17, 1998Asics CorporationMidsole cushioning system
US5946824 *Aug 19, 1997Sep 7, 1999Orion Sports & Leisure, Inc.Sole support structure for an athletic shoe
US6321468 *Jul 10, 1998Nov 27, 2001Payless Shoesource, Inc.Footwear outsole having arcuate inner-structure
US6618959 *Apr 12, 2000Sep 16, 2003Puma Ag Rudolf Dassler SportCushioning insert for a shoe and shoe that is provided with such a cushioning insert
USRE32412 *Dec 2, 1985May 12, 1987Motion Analysis, Inc.Elastomeric shoesole
EP0278031A1 *Feb 10, 1987Aug 17, 1988Herbert Dr.-Ing. FunckResilient sole for sports and leasure shoes
EP0408793A1 *Jul 20, 1989Jan 23, 1991Matthias FunckShoe sole made of an elastic rubber material
WO1981001234A1 *Nov 3, 1980May 14, 1981Tilburg RSoles
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/149, 36/3.00B, 36/29
International ClassificationA43B13/18
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/187
European ClassificationA43B13/18F