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Publication numberUS2151895 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 28, 1939
Filing dateApr 22, 1938
Priority dateApr 22, 1938
Publication numberUS 2151895 A, US 2151895A, US-A-2151895, US2151895 A, US2151895A
InventorsWigo Carlson Carl
Original AssigneeWigo Carlson Carl
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Utility pail attachment
US 2151895 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 28, 1939. c w CARLSON 2,151,895

UTILITY PAIL ATTACHMENT Filed April 22, 1938 INVENTOR BY I ATTO RN EY Patented Mar. 28, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFlCE 2,151,895 UTILITY PAIL ATTACHMENT Carl Wigo Carlson, Springdale, Conn.

Application April 22, 1938, Serial No. 203,693

'2 Claims. (Cl. 91-66) This invention relates to a general utility paint pail attachment which is simple and inexpensive, and yet which is extremely useful to master painters. The paint pail attachment of my invention is formed with a circular rim portion and a depending skirt portion whereby it may be readily slipped over the rim of a standard paint pail.

Those skilledin the art will appreciate that painters carry their pails about in their work, and

' that in so doing the paint has a tendency to shift about in the pail, or slop, as it is known in the trade. My paint pail attachment prevents paint .from' slopping over the rim of'the pail, and will confine the slopping within certain limits.

In addition, the shape of my attachment is such that any paint which strikes the under surface of the rim portion thereof, will be readily deflected downwardly and back into the paint pail. This deflection will be along the periphery of the inside edge of the rim of my attachment, so as to prevent the forming of the usual "skin on the' inner paint pail surface- Asa further feature of my invention, the rim portion of my attachment is so formed that the paint brush may be rested thereon, and so that while resting thereon the paint dropping therefrom will flow freely downwardly and back into the paint pail.

As still a further feature of my invention, a

paint brush may be wiped against the inner periphery of the rim portion of my attachment each time that the brush is removed from the pail, so as to assist in removing excess paint from the brush. Since the excess paint will flow down into 35 the pail along the inside edge of the rim portion of my attachment, it will prevent the formation of the usual skin about the .inside surface of the paint pail, much in the same manner as already pointed out.

40 My attachment is so constructed also that it will hold a strainer cloth in proper position under tension and below the upper edge of my paint pail, so that a strainer cloth may function most efficiently. Also, instead of a strainer cloth', an

45 ordinary cloth or paper may be secured in place by my attachment to protect the paint from exposure to the atmosphere, all as will be readily understood by those skilled in the art.

As still a further feature of my invention, my

50 attachment is so formed that it will not interfere with the action of the usual bail formed on paint pails.

Having thus described my invention generally, I shall now referv to the drawing in which a pre- 55 ierred form of my invention is illustrated. Fig. 1

shows my attachment applied to a pail, and with a brush lying thereon. Fig. 2 is a cross section along lines 2-2 of Fig. 1, but showing the brush being wiped against the inner peripheral edge of the attachment for removing excess paint therer from. Fig. 3 shows my attachment used for holding a strainer cloth in position, or a cover cloth in position-as the case may be.

Referring now more particularly to the drawing, reference numeral l0 refers to a standard 10 paint pail havinga bail ll pivoted at I2 to the sides of the pail. My attachment is in the form of a circular member having a rim portion l3 and a skirt portion I4 whereby it may be slipped over the edge I5 of the paint pail I0. 15

The skirt portion H is cut away as at I6 on each side thereof, so as not to interfere with' the movement of the bail I I, all as will be quite clear.

In Fig. 1, I illustrate how the paint brush P may be placed so as to rest on the rim portion 13 of my 20 attachment, thus facilitating the carrying of the pail and brush by the painter up the various ladders and to various painting positions. Because of the manner in which the rim portion l3 slants downwardly, it is comparatively easy to hold the 25 paint brush in place.

In Fig. 2, the degree of slanting of the rim portion I3 of my attachment is better shown, and it will be readily appreciated that should paint slop upwardly, it will be prevented from slopping out of the paint pail Ill by the said rim portion i 3. Also, the paint will gradually flow off the said rim portion l3 toward its center, and will drop off along the inner peripheral edge I! of the said rim portion Hi. In this way, the formation of a skin along the inner surface of the pail is effectively prevented to a considerable extent.

The inner periphery ll serves also as a surface against which the paint brush P may be wiped, as is shown in Fig. 2, to remove excess paint, all as will be quite clear to those skilled in the art. Incidentally, this excess paint will also drop down into the pail from the peripheral edge, so as to avoid its forming a "skin on the inner pail surface.

Referring now to Fig. 3, a strainer cloth 8 is shown passing over the rim l5 of the paint pail, and downwardly along the line determined by' the rim portion l3. In this way, the strainer cloth is held taut for ready straining, and is maintained below the upper edge of the rim of the pail, so as to allow for straining. This is a very highly desirable construction, as will be appreciated, and is useful where straining through a taut cloth is absolutely essential.

Those skilled in the art will appreciate that in place of the strainer cloth S, some other type of cloth, or even paper, may be used. This other cloth or paper will, of course, be held in place and function as a cover for the paint in the pail.

It will thus be seen that my attachment, while being quite simple, easy to fabricate and extremely inexpensive, has a number of uses for the master painter.

I now claim:

1. A general utility paint pail attachment formed 01 an integral circular rim member having 2. depending circular skirt whereby said attachment may be slipped over the rim of a paint pail and irictionally held thereon, portions of said skirt being cut away to allow free swinging of the hail of the pail, the circular rim extending inwardly of the pail rim and angularly downwardly whereby to furnish a support on which a brush may be rested, a barrier against slopping of the paint outwardly of the paint pail, and a wiping surface against which a paint brush may be wiped, the said attachment serving also to hold a cover or straining cloth in place over the rim or the paint pail, and with the inwardly and downwardly extending rim portion of said attachment holding said cloth taut and below the pail rim level while the depending circular skirt portion holds the straining cloth on the pail periphery.

2. A general utility paint pail attachment formed of an integral circular rim member having a depending circular skirt whereby said attachment may be slipped over the rim of a paint pail and frictionally held thereon, the circular rim extending inwardly of the pail rim and angularly downwardly whereby to furnish a support on which a brush may be rested, a barrier against slopping oi! the paint outwardly of the paint pail, and a wiping surface against which a paint brush may be wiped, the said attachment serving also to hold a cover or straining cloth in place over the rim of said paint pail, and with the inwardly and downwardly extending rim portion of said attachment holding said cloth taut and below the pail rim level while the depending circular skirt portion holds the straining cloth on the pail periphery.

CARL WIGO CARLSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2478291 *Nov 2, 1946Aug 9, 1949Litwaitis John VCombined bail holder and brush wiper for paint cans
US2611508 *Aug 3, 1948Sep 23, 1952John P Cochran CompanyGuard for groove-top containers
US2630241 *Jun 29, 1951Mar 3, 1953Schnabel Fred CDrip tray for paint cans
US2660333 *Oct 3, 1949Nov 24, 1953Claude PaxtonPaint can brush scraper
US2682359 *Dec 21, 1950Jun 29, 1954American Can CoPouring spout for friction plug containers
US2856095 *Oct 29, 1956Oct 14, 1958Schnabel Fred CAll purpose drip tray and plate
US2921330 *Mar 11, 1957Jan 19, 1960George PrytikinAttachment for a paint can or the like
US3065483 *Nov 14, 1960Nov 27, 1962Joseph CuratoloCleaners for louvers and shutters or the like
US4312459 *Sep 27, 1979Jan 26, 1982Leach Albert EPaint can rim cover and lid combination
US4369890 *Sep 24, 1980Jan 25, 1983Bennett Gordon CPaint can collar
US5123576 *Sep 17, 1990Jun 23, 1992Lawrence Jonnay JPaint can accessory
US5765507 *Mar 13, 1996Jun 16, 1998Jones, Day, Reavis & PogueAnimal bath
US5975346 *Jun 30, 1997Nov 2, 1999The Sherwin-Williams CompanyContainer for paints and similar materials
US6126048 *Jun 24, 1999Oct 3, 2000Bublitz; Todd F.Removable paint can extension and cover
US6135310 *Oct 28, 1999Oct 24, 2000Svehaug; OswaldCombination paint brush holder and paint pourer unit for paint cans
US6446827 *Oct 3, 2001Sep 10, 2002R. W. AkinsPaint container and dispenser apparatus for use with a paint brush
US7172090 *Dec 23, 2003Feb 6, 2007Jackson Vernon VContainer accessory for protecting a container rim and brush
US8757424 *Feb 22, 2010Jun 24, 2014Derek S. ChesserBucket
US9145025 *Oct 10, 2013Sep 29, 2015John NazlianPaint can halo
US20150102045 *Oct 10, 2013Apr 16, 2015John NazlianPaint Can Halo
WO1997018134A1 *Nov 15, 1996May 22, 1997Oksanen, Pekka, Paavo, JuhaniCarton attachment
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/697, 220/698, 15/264, 220/733
International ClassificationB44D3/12
Cooperative ClassificationB44D3/128
European ClassificationB44D3/12N