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Publication numberUS2152077 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 28, 1939
Filing dateFeb 6, 1935
Priority dateFeb 6, 1935
Publication numberUS 2152077 A, US 2152077A, US-A-2152077, US2152077 A, US2152077A
InventorsArchibald F Meston, Harry A Wintermute
Original AssigneeBehr Manning Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Production of piled surfaces in pattern form
US 2152077 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 28, 1939. F 0 ET AL 2,152,077

PRODUCTION OF FILED SURFACES IN PATTERN FORM Filed Feb. 6, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet l J .41. '4 "III/III!!!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII/ 4 I I l I I /0 l l I I I I I l III III I I" I" I I \I J/ I l E .3 I I I (H I I I l I $162M F 777% w/M I I I l I I I I I I I l I I I I l II I|| II I I III March 28, 1939. A. F. MESTON ET AL PRODUCTION OF FILED SURFACES IN PATTERN FORM Filed Feb. 6, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 March 28, 1939. A. F. MESTON ET AL PRODUCTION OF FILED SURFACES IN PATTERN FORM 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Feb. 6, 1935 March 28, 1939. A. F. MESTON ET AL 2,152,077

PRODUCTION OF FILED SURFACES IN PATTERN FORM Filed Feb. 6, 1935 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Patented Mar. 28, 1939 m-.1) s'rArasf raonUc'rIoN or'rrmcn SURFACES m] roman romu Archibald F. Meston, Middlesemaml Harry A. I

Winter-mute, Plainfield, N. J., asslgnors, by mesne assignments, to 'Behr-Manning. Corporation, a corporation of Massachusetts Application February a, 1935, 'Serial No. 5,288

i 15 Claims.

This invention relates to coating and/or decorating surfaces with simulated piles in pattern form. It has to do in particular with apparatus and methods for making and controlling a non-' 5 uniform electricfield used in the deposition of elongated particles on adhesive covered surfaces for the purpose of effecting a topical arrangement of the particles on the surfaces, for example, in pleasing patterns.

Fibers, such as rayon flocks, can be deposited in oriented position upon an adhesive covered 1 surface if the surface is positioned in an electric field and fibers are introduced into the electric field in unrestrained manner. The conditions required for satisfactory deposition of fibers in the piling of surfaces are described incopending applications Serial No. 690,252, L. P. Miller, filed Sept. 20, 1933; Serial No. 692,201, A. F.- Meston,

filed Oct. 4, 1933; and Serial No. 699,456, H. A. 'Wintermute, filed Nov. 23, 1933.

The piles made with the apparatus and methods used and described in the applications just mentioned are quite uniform in composition and appearance. Most of the fibers stand erect, perpendicular to the surface, making piles of monotonous evenness from a decorative standpoint.

It has now been found that by suitable control of.

the electric field by'means of which the fibers are deposited, and particularly by the use of a deliberately warped or discontinuous electric field, pleasing variations and definite patterns can be obtained in the pile.

Apparatus useful in carrying out the invention and several embodiments of the invention, including novel methods and products, are hereinafter described with particular reference to the I appended drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic side view of complementary electrodes and an electric field therebetween in which fibers are being attached by' the forces prevailing in a non-uniform portion of the field;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary view in side elevation of an assembly of electrode elements as used in the deposition of fibers in accordance with the invention;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary plan view of what is shown in Fig. 2 taken at H;

Figs. 4 and 5 are fragmentary views comparable to Figs. 2 and 3, respectively, showing the utilization of somewhat different elements in the electrode structure used with the invention;

Fig. 6 is a plan view of another arrangement of electrode elements useful in setting up a nonuniform field in accordance with the invention;

cluding air jets useful in applying fibers to surfaces in accordance 'with the invention; I

Figs. 11, 12 and 13 show with plan views, the types of patterns which can be obtained with the apparatus illustrated in Fig.

Fig. 14 is a plan view of a foraminous electrode,

comprising corona forming elements, useful in practicing the invention;

Fig. 15 shows diagrammatically in end elevation, apparatus for utilizing the electrode shown in Fig. 14;

Figs. 16, 17 and 18 are views of fragmentary portions of products made with reticulated electrodes; 4

Fig. 19 shows diagrammatically, in side elevation, apparatus for depositing fibers in pattern formation, by utilizing a moving field stencil;

Figs. 20 and 21 show typical forms of field stencils used with the invention;

Fig. 22 illustrates, in side view, an adhesive applyingroll with cut-away portions;

Fig. 23 shows, in sectional elevation, an electrode assembly useful in depositing fibers on a surface coated with the roll shown in Fig. 22; and

Fig. 24 is a diagrammatic view in side elevation of apparatus that permits the utilization of the various electrodes and other means illustrated inthe various figures and the carrying out of the several methods of the invention to be hereinafter described.

In Fig. 1, numerals l and 3 identify electrodes between which an electric field has been established; electrode I is grounded as indicated at 2 and electrode 3' is insulated from ground and connected to a source of high potential constant polarity current represented by tube rectifier 4. The so-called lines of force of the electric field represented by lines [have the electrodes perpendicular to the surface. Electrode'l has a pointed or rounded top and the lines of force curve and spread out in the manner shown as they leave the small area presented by the topof the electrode. Opposing or complementary electrode 3, on the other hand, has a flat surface upon which the lines of force terminate and the'lines in the positions 8', 8'

of force in the vicinity of this electrode are straight, parallel, and uniformly distributed.

When a non-conducting sheet 8 covered with adhesive I is positioned between electrodes I and 3 and short fibers are freely suspended in the electric field the fibers are oriented and attached to the adhesive covered sheet parallel to the lines of force passing through the sheet at the point of attachment. Once attached they maintain the position of original attachment and resist realignment by forces that may be applied subsequently. when the sheet to be piled with fibers is placed in the position marked 8', the fibers are attached and a uniform pile of upright fibers is obtained. But if a sheet is held against. or a short distance from, electrode l, the fibers are attached at angles'to the perpendicular as indicated at 8, 8 because of the inclined positions of the lines of force 5 in this region of the electric'field. For instance, the field near a point causes the fibers to become arranged like the petals of a flower.

In Figs. 2 and 3, the electrode elements over which the adhesive covered sheet I! is positioned while being piled comprises members it with a more or less extended top surface and members II with very restricted or edged top surfaces. The complementary electrode i2 is preferably fiat or has an extended surface. The arrangement of the fibers in the pile made with the electric field between electrode elements l and ii and electrode i2 is shown in Fig. 2. The fibers i3 over the extended portions i0 are deposited in erect position except perhaps over the edges of elements l0, while the fibers l4 over edges ll are deposited in the inclined positions shown and provide a striped efiect. This pattern can be made while the sheet is moving in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 3, but if it is desired to have the stripes extend crosswise of the sheet, the electrode elements l0 and H must move at the same speed as the sheet.

In Figs. 4 and 5 the electrode assembly which influences the deposition of the fibers is made up of bars I 6 and pointed members ll. Complementary electrode I 8 has a flat extended surface. The pile formed with these electrode elements, assembled as shown, comprises parallel stripes with spots between them, the stripes being formed of fibers 20 deposited over rods i6 perpendicular to sheet it except at the edges and the spots being formed of fibers 2! which are deposited over points I! in inclined positions. The smaller the diameter of rods i5 and the closer these are, to the sheet l9 being piled, the more the fibers at the edges of the stripes lean .outward and set off the stripes, and the closer points i! are'to sheet I 9 the more pronounced is the inclination of the fibers in points 25.

.By varying the relative positions of the electrode elements in Figs. 4 and 5 the pattern formed will present various effects. The electrical connections can be varied also. It will be noted that while elements ID in Fig. 2 are grounded, elements IS in Fig. 4 are not connected to ground, but are allowed to electrically float on insulating supports (not shown) and to take the voltage resulting from their position in the electric field. If the sheet being piled is held stationary during the deposition of the fibers the pattern will comprise stripes with dots between, but if the sheet is moved during deposition the electrode elements, at least points I'I, must move at the same speed as the sheet or streaks will result in the pattern over the points.

Fig. 6 is a plan view of an assembly of electrode elements not unlike the assembly shown in Fig. 5, but in Fig. 6 the bars (similar to those marked iii in Fig. 5) making up member 24 have been joined together to form a single continuous element. Points 25, one of which is positioned in the center of each individual hexagon, have been found to alter the electric field in such manner that the pile deposited by it comprises hexagon figures of unusual interest. The fibers are inclined at various angles and when looking at the pile from first one and then another position the sheen. changes, displaying many fragments of hexagons, some lustrous and some of which are dull. Of course, to provide a closed pattern like the one made with the electrode of Fig. 6, the electrode must participate in any movement undergone by the surface being piled, as will be described, for example, in connection with Fig. 24.

In Fig. 7,. elements 3i are strips of insulating material, for instance, of hard rubber or phenol condensation products, attached to a conducting plate 32. Dielectric material with a specific inductive capacity several times that of air, examples of which are porcelain, mica or Bakelite, when placed in an electric field, will locally concentrate the -lines of force in the field in the vicinity of the pieces of dielectric. The arrangement shown in Fig. 7 has conducting plate 32 connected through conductor 35 to a source of unidirectional current at a potential of, say, 70,000 volts above ground. Complementary electrode 33 is positioned some 4 inches below member 32 and is maintained at ground potential. Elements 3i are, therefore, positioned in the strong electric field that exists between electrodes 32 and 33 and tend to concentrate the lines of force as they approach electrode 32.

Now if an adhesive covered surface, as sheet 34, that is not' conducting, is placed just in front of elements 3i and fibers are suspended in the electric field above electrode 33, or distributed over the surface of electrode 33, many of the fibers will be raised and oriented by the electrical field and attracted to electrode 32. The fibers will move with their long axis parallel to the electric lines of force and become attached to the adhesive covered under surface of sheet 34 in the inclined positions shown. In this embodiment of the invention the electric field is warped by placing insulating members of sharp curvature or limited area before a conducting member, preferably a simple member of extended area, whereas in the apparatus illustrated in Figs. 1, 2, 4 and 6, warped fields are established by providing conducting elements of sharp curvature and limited area. The insulating strips 3| in Fig. 7 can be formed into geometrical figures, letters and the like, thus permitting a wide variety in the patterns formed.

Figs. 8 and 9 illustrate another electrode structure comprising insulating material used with certain embodiments of the invention. It is made up of a conducting base plate 27, conducting elements 28, here shown as narrow strips with rounded tops, and dielectric material 29 between the strips. Electrodes of this construction give very striking results. The sheet to be piled is placed parallel to the top surface of material 29 and touching or closely adjacent the top (exposed) edges of members 28 and a complementary electrode is positioned at a proper distance 29 as electrode i2 is positioned above members ill in Fig. 2. The pile deposited when a strong electric field is established between the electrodes shows very pleasing shaded stripes, probably due to peculiar distortions in the electric field produced at top of elements 28 where they emerge from insulating material 29. The arrangement of the conductive members with relation to the insulating material has been found to have a considerable effect on the patterns produced. With the electrode shown in Figs. 8 and 9, very good patterns have been obtained with conducting edges 28 projecting about to flinch abov the surface of "dielectric filler 29.

In those embodiments of the invention shown in Figs. 1 to 9, inclusive, the controlling electrode, that is the electrode influencing the pattern in the pile most greatly, is placed just back of the sheet or other member, the surface of which is to be piled. The adhesive coating is placed on the side of the sheet away from the controlling electrode andfaces the complementary electrode controlling electrode, member I9 is which furnishes a surface upon which the other end of the electric field terminates. For example,- in Fig. 4, elements i9 and i1 comprise the the complementary electrode, and I9 is the sheet being piled with the adhesive coating on the side of the sheet away from electrode l6, l1. Figs. 6, 8 and 9 show no complementary electrodes, but it is to be understood that in using the controlling electrodes shown in these figures, suitable opposing or complementary electrodes are also used. The electrodes can be positioned so that the fibers move downward to become attached to the coated surface, as in Fig. 2, or the electrodes can be arranged to cause the fibers to move upward as in Fig. 7. The latter arrangement, or an arrangement with vertically positioned surfaces, is adfrom the sheet to be piled can greatly influence, the deposition of the fibers comprising the pile.

The sheet to be piled in Fig. 10 is positioned adjacent an electrode of smooth contour, in this instance, a roll 31 and corona-forming complementary electrodes 40 are responsible for the pattern efiect in the pile. It has been found that if the fibers to be electrically deposited are introduced through a tube about which corona discharges are present, desirable results in patvterned piles can be obtained. In Fig. 10, sheet travels about a grounded roll 31 which preferhesive covered surface 99 to electrodes 40, each made up ..of a tube 4| and discharge points 42.

' It hasbeen found thatif wire points 42 are left ofl when rayon flocks or similarflbers are blown through tubes 4i and the tubes are connected to a source of unidirectional high potential current, the flocks becomescattered as they are deposited. Such aresult is shown at 43 in Fig. 11.

With points 42 attached to and arranged about high potential tubes 4!, the flocks are concentrated locally 'as illustrated in Figs. 12 and 13.

' Ifsheet 39 moves while electrodes 40 are stationary,but continuously depositing flbeia'stripes 44 are formed. If the .fibers are deposited only produced are the size of the tubes or nozzles, the

velocity of the air stream, the emphasis given the corona emanating from the points as caused by variously positioning the points about the end of the tube, and the strength of the electric field. The stripes or points deposited with the electrode assembly in Fig. 10 may be insufficient in themselves to form a pleasing pattern. Advantageously all'of surface 39 is covered with adhesive, then spots are first deposited in one color in the manner just described, and then the sheet is moved into another part of the apparatus shown in Fig. 24 where the unpiled surface is covered with fibers of a different color. Not only can the fibers successively deposited be of different colors, but they can be of different length and/or luster, and by controlling the characteristics of the electric field and the length of treatment the spots or stripes can be made to have a very different appearance from the pile filled in between. The furs of certain animals, the silver fox, for instance, can be imitated by using the method just described.

It has been found desirable in the electrical attachment of fibers to form a pile to have the fibers approach the surface to be piled separately, not in clumps or treed-together. Screens may be used to break up grouped fibers as they are floated in air streams into the electric field and a simple manner of using a screen or other foraminous member for this purpose is to have it function as one of the electrodes, Figs. 14 and 15 show an electrode 41 that functions as a complementary electrode to grounded electrode 59. Electrode 41 of conducting material is insulated from ground and positioned about four inches below electrode 50 and is connected by conductor 53 to a source of unidirectional high potential current. It functions also to break up clumps of fibers blown by air jets 56 from supply means 55 that are not completely disintegrated by disintegrating means 51. It has been discovered that a foraminous electrode, positioned and used as is. electrode 41 in Fig. 15, can be caused to influence the arrangement of fibers as they are electrically deposited on a surface,-on the surface of sheet 52, for example, as it is held adjacent .50. One way of altering the'pile formed of the deposited fibers is to make foraminous electrode 41 with edges 49 projecting through surface 48 which is preferably of screen. The electric field adjacent edges 49 is so concentrated when a high voltage drop is impressed across electrodes 41 and 59 that corona discharges emanate from the edges and the fibers just over the edges deposit in other than erect positions as indicated at 5i. Depressed stripe effects are given the pile formed with electrodes 41 and 59. Of course, points or edges arranged in patterns could be substituted for edge members 49 in electrode 41.

Figs. 16,17 and 18 are plan views of fragments of patterned piles which maybe made with the a comprised of parallel wires and that shown in Fig.

- 18 may be made with a net of rather small mesh used as a controlling electrode and positioned several inches from the adhesive covered surface being piled. The piles shown in Figs. 16, 17 and 18 are characterized by having lines and/or dots be piled, is moved through the electric field between electrodes and 66, preferably Just under and touching electrode 60, as shown. A member' 63, advantageously formed as a belt with stencilllke perforations such as the diamond design shown in Fig. 20 or the slots shown in Fig. 21, is moved parallel with and at the same speed as sheet 6!. It is held a short distance, for example one-fourth inch, in front of adhesive covered surface 62. The fibers to be deposited are brought into the apparatus on a moving porous belt'66. When the fibers are carried by belt 86 over the top of wind box 67, compressed air issuing from nozzles 68 and passing through regulating means 68 blows through the interstices of belt 66 and blows the fibers up through electrode 66 and into the electric field for deposition on surface 62. -Very definite patterns are made with the apparatus shown in Fig. 19 and they can be made very colorful if the sheet to be piled is passed through several partially shielded fields, each one depositing fibers of a diflerent color.

Belt 63 can be made of wire or other attenuated members woven into a pattern and it will influence the deposition of the fibers comprising the pile by altering the electric field. The resulting patterns willbe much like those shown in Figs. 16 and 17, but in more striking relief, Or belt 63 can be made up as a stencil and cause a pattern to be made by definitely covering portions of surface 62 and permitting fiocks to be deposited only behind openings in the stencil. Besides the diamond pattern shown in Fig. 20, decorative designs, such as flowers, and commercial outlines comprising names, can be formed. Such stencillike members effect the pattern not only mechanically but also effect it by locally altering the characteristics and intensity of the electric field and therefore they may be designated as "field stencils.

Figs. 22 and 23 illustrate apparatus adapted to I apply adhesive locally to a surface and then to pile the adhesive covered portions in accordance with the invention. In Fig. 22, adhesive applying roll II has cut away portions 12 and raised portions I3. Only the raised portions carry adhesive to the surface to be piled and in the figure a transverse cross-section of a sheet 16 is shown with strips of adhesive l8 applied thereto by raised portions 13. Fig. 23 shows sheet 15 after having been locally coated with adhesive with roll II passing through a strong electric field between complementary electrodes I6 and II. Electrode 11 comprises a conducting plate 18 on the bottom surface of which tubes I9, or other members of small surface area which may be but are. not necessarily conducting, are attached. Tubes I9 are spaced to correspond with the spacing of raised portions I8 on applicating roll H. Sheet 16 is positioned under and adjacent tubes 18 and for continuous operation, is moved in a direction parallel to the tubes. The pile deposited on adhesive strips 16, by action of the electric field in the manner previously described, is not uniformly erect, but leans outwardly at the edges and pro- .iects into unpiled spaces 8|. The inclined positions of some of the fibers is due to the direction: taken by the lines of force of the electric field approaching the surfaces of tubes I8. The effect of ,the inclined fibers partially covering spaces 8| is especially striking when the fibers are of one color and sheet 15 is of another color.

' Fig. 24 is a diagrammatic view in side elevation of apparatus which may be used in successively applying the several embodiments of the invention which have been described. A sheet 86 of the material to be piled, for example, a light weight, flexible but closely woven textile, is unwound from supply roll 85, passed over an adhesive applying roll 8'5, ever positioning and tensioning rolls 80, 9t and 82, and through means, not shown, for finishing and storing the piled product. Roll 81 is shown with raised portions 88 to apply the adhesive from vessel 89 to the surface of sheet 86 in restricted areas only as in that embodiment of the invention illustrated by Figs. 22 and 23. Where the'surface of the sheet is to be completely piled, a smooth roll to spread adhesive over the entire surface of the sheet is used.

As the adhesive coated sheet goes over roll 90, itmay'be sprayed with fibers from one or more sp'ray electrodes MI in accordance with the practice described in connection with Figs. 10, 11, 12 and 13. If the spray electrodes I 0| are operated continuously, lines of fibers are deposited upon sheet 86 as shown in Fig. 12, but if the spraying is done at intervals only, spaced patches such as the spots shown in Fig. 13 will be deposited. The fibers for sprays I09 are supplied through conduit I02 and this can be made to move away from the entrance of sprays IN by reciprocating means, for instance, crank with a quick return movement, through connecting rod I08 will make conduit I02 articulate at joint I06 at the chosen intervals when deposition of particles is to be interrupted. During the period of interruption the fibers blow out the end of conduit I02 and fall to the bottom of casing I06 to be lifted again by blower I01. If electrode I0! is maintained at high potential connecting tube I00 is made of insulating material.

Sheet 86 next passes through an electric field established between screen electrode I I0 and control electrode III by means of a high voltage source not shown. The latter electrode can be in the form of any of the control electrodes shown in Figs. 1 to 9, inclusive, but is made into or is attached to an endless hand. If electrode III is to cause the fibers to deposit in a closed pattern or one with transverse marks, it must move at the same speed and in the same direction as sheet 86 while sheet 86 is moving through the electric field This is accomplished by above electrode IIO. turning pulley II2, over which electrode III passes, by a positive drive II8 such as a chain from a source of power I which also turns pulley 80 over which sheet 86 passes, in positive manner. Positive synchronous movement of belt and ,electrodecan also be obtained by having spurs project from the edge of electrode III and engage perforations along the edges of sheet 86 in the manner known to-the moving picture art.

I04 acting, preferably stencilin the manner of memberttin Fig. 19. The'stericllling belt mustmove at the same speed asfsheet and su'ch i movement. is obtained through drive 1m. Other field alteringmeans,

, such as'scrjeens, can .be used'in place of stencilling I A'fiat stationary electrode may means I16, and such means travelling atthe speed of sheet 88 will give the "pile on sheet 06 a woven appearance as indicated in Figs. 16 and'l8. Although pattern control electrode III and sten cilling or othr field altering means 'I I8 can be used atthe sa'me time, ordinarily this is not done.

' be used in place of speciaielectrodel II when a field stencil ls be- 16 1 5 i ont of sheet 88. Fibersare supplied i' lafl m b w supply meansfi20 in electrodes II! and III by H H i which air jets are utilized to'pro'jectthefibers up through electrode I III.

Electrodes I24 and I25inFig. 24 are energized and used tojdeposit fibers if portionsof the surface-of sheet 86' remain unpiled after the sheet passes through the processing [steps described in the above; .No special effect is sought in this last step, Both electrodes have','iin general, fiat ,surfaces and the uniform field that results from impressing ahigh volta e.,aorosselectrodes I24 and I25" tends tojdepositan erect uniformjpile. The deposition of fibers, in this step is usuallyfor the purposebf completing the pile started with spray electrodes IIlI and/or thepile deposited through field stencil H6 and this filling is often made with fibers of adifferent color from that used in the'preceding steps. f v a 7 Apparatus for satisfactorily supplying fibers to the: field between electrodes I24 and I25 is shown diagrammatically under electrode I24. It comprises" an endlessfforaminous conveying belt I26 upon which fibers are spread by a distributor I10, preferably agitated, and a blowing -means I21 th'atfdistributes air under pressure under belt I26 and causes it to pass up through the belt and raise the fiberstherefromand blow them through tion of pile forming-materialsby the local alterascreen electrode I24. Undeposited fibers are collected in hopper I28 and conveyed by an air stream set in motionby fan. I29 to filter bag collector I31 and thence to distributor I30.

. 24 illustrates apparatuswith a wide range of fusefulness in the forming of simulated piles on adhesive. covered surfaces. It is illustrative ofthe .wide variation in methods and means for obtaining useful patterns inthe electrical deposition of the characteristics of the electrical field effecting the deposition,so as to produce a definite topical non-uniformity therein. It is obviously subject tora very large degree of variation and may be provided with electrode rapping or agitating means and other devices and modifications.

Weclaimr 'r 1. Apparatus for electrically depositing attenuated fibers upon an adhesive coated surface to form a pile thereon in pattern form, comprising complementary electrodes, means for maintaining a high potential difference between said electrodes to establish an electric field therebetween, one of said electrodes being formed to cause local variations in the concentration of the electric field between said electrodes, means for passing an adhesive-surfaced base material through the non-uniform portion of said field,

means for moving said last named electrode substantially synchronously with said base material, and means for supplying attenuated fibers to said field.

2. Apparatus for electrically depositing attenuated fibers upon an adhesive coated surface to form a pile thereon in pattern form comprising complementary electrodes, means for maintaining a high potential difference between said electrodes to establish an electric field therebetween, atleast one of said electrodes comprising a plurality of elements of different electrical characteristics providing, when viewed from the complementary electrode, a surface locally varied to produce in the electric field between said electrodes local concentrations, means for Dositioning an adhesive-surfaced ,base material in they supplying attenuated fibers to saidfield.

3 Apparatus for electrically depositing attenuated fibers upon an adhesive coated surface to form' a pile thereon in pattern form comprising complementary electrodes, means for maintaining a high potential difference between said electrodes to establish an electric field therebetween, at least one of said electrodes comprising a plurality of elements varying in radius of ourvature to produce in the electric field between said electrodes local concentrations, means for positioning an adhesive-surfaced base material inthe non-uniform portion of said field, and means. for supplying attenuated fibers to said field.

4. Apparatus for electrically depositing attenuated fibers upon an adhesive coated surface to form a pile thereon in pattern form comprising complementary electrodes, means for maintaining a high potential difference between said electrodes to establish an electric field therebetween, at least one of said electrodes comprising a plurality of members of different specific inductive capacity producing in the electric field between saidelectrodes local concentrations, means for positioning an adhesive-surfaced base material in the non-uniform portion of said field, and means for supplying attenuated fibers to said field.

5. Apparatus for electrically depositing attenuated fibers upon an adhesive coated surface to form a pile thereon in pattern form comprising complementary electrodes, means for maintaining a high potential difference between said electrodes to establish an electric field therebetween, at least one of said electrodes comprising a plurality of members of small radius of curvature spaced from the complementary electrode and producing in the electric field between said electrodes local concentrations, means for positioning an adhesive-surfaced base material in the non-uniform portion of said field, and at least streams, means for one of said electrodes comprising a conduit for supplying attenuated fibers to said field.

7. Apparatus for electrically depositing attenuated fibers upon an adhesive coated surface to form a pile thereon in pattern form comprising complementary electrodes, means for maintaining a high potential difference between said electrodes to establish an electric field therebetween, at least one of said electrodes comprising a plurality of members of small radius of curvature spaced from the complementary electrode and producing in the electric field between said electrodes local concentrations, means for positioning an adhesive-surfaced base materialin the non-uniform portion of said field, and said electrode having members of small radius of curvature comprising a conduit for supplying attenuated fibers to said field.

8. Apparatus for electrically depositing attenuated fibers upon an adhesive coated surface to form a pile thereon in pattern form comprising complementary electrodes, meansior maintaining a high potential difference between said electrodes to establish an electric field therebetween, at least one of said electrodes comprising a plurality of members of small radius of curvature spaced from the complementary electrode and producing in the electric field between said electrodes ionic positioning an adhesivesurfaced base material in the portion of the field comprising said ionic streams, and means for supplying attenuated fibers to said field.

9. Apparatus for electrically depositing attenuated fibers'upon an adhesive coated surface to form a pile thereon in pattern form comprising complementary electrodes, means for maintaining a high potential difference between said electrodes to establish an electric field therebetween, at least one of said electrodes comprising a plurality of members of small radius of curvature spaced from the complementary electrode and producing in the electric field between said electrodes localized ionic streams, means for. positioning an adhesive-surfaced base material in the portion of the field comprising said ionic streams, and means for supplying attenuated fibers to said field.

10. Apparatus for electrically depositing attenuated fibers upon an adhesive coated surface to form a pile thereon in pattern form, comprising complementary electrodes, means for maintaining a high potential difierence between said electrodes to establish an electric field therebetween, at least one of said electrodes having local variations in electrical characteristics of the material forming said electrode whereby the electric field between said electrodes is caused to comprise locally concentrated portions, means for positioning an adhesive-surfaced base material in the non-uniform portion of the field, and means for supplying attenuated fibers to said field.

11. Apparatus for electrically depositing attenuated fibers upon an adhesive coated surface cally concentrated to form a pile thereon in pattern form, comprising complementary electrodes, means for maintaining a high potential difierence between said electrodes to establish an electric. field therebetween, at least one of said electrodes having local variations in specific inductive capacity of the material forming said electrode whereby the electric field between said electrodes is caused to comprise locally concentrated portions, means for positioning an adhesive-surfaced base material in the non-uniform portion of the field, and means for supplying attenuated fibers to said field.

12. A method for electrically depositing attenuated fibers upon an adhesive coated surface to form a pile thereon in pattern form which comprises establishing an electric field having loportions, positioning an adhesive-surfaced base material in the nonuniform portion of said field, and supplying attenuated fibers to said field thereby depositing the fibers on said base material in pattern form.

13. A method for electrically depositing attenuated fibers upon an adhesive coated surface to form a pile thereon in pattern form which comprises establishing an electric field having locally concentrated portions, positioning an adhesive-surfaced base material in the non-uniform portion of said field, supplying attenuated fibers to said field thereby depositing the fibers on said base material in pattern form, thereafter positioning said base material in a substantially uniform electric field, and supplying fibers of different appearance from said first deposited fibers to said field.

14. A method for electrically depositing attenuated fibers upon an adhesive coated surface to form a pile thereon in pattern form which comprises establishing an electric field having locally concentrated portions, passing an adhesivesurfaced base material through the non-uniform portion of said field, supplying attenuated fibers to said field thereby depositing the fibers on said base material in pattern form. thereafter pass-' ing said base material through a substantially uniform electric field, and supplying fibers of different appearance from said first deposited fibers to said field.

15. A method for electrically depositing attenuated fibers upon an adhesive coated surface to form a pile thereon in pattern form which comprises establishing an electric field having locally concentrated portions, passing an adhesive-surfaced base material through the non-uniform portion of said field, supplying attenuated fibers to said field thereby depositing the fibers on said base material in pattern form, thereafter passing said base material through a second field constituted differently from said first field, and supplying fibers of difi'erent appearance from said first deposited fibers to said field.

ARCHIBALD F. MESTON. HARRY A. WIN'I'ERMU'I'E.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification427/463, 118/624, 118/630, 427/466, 427/414, 156/72, 156/273.1, 118/308, 101/DIG.370
International ClassificationB44B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S101/37, B44B1/00, B44B2700/00
European ClassificationB44B1/00