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Publication numberUS2152863 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1939
Filing dateDec 7, 1937
Priority dateDec 7, 1937
Publication numberUS 2152863 A, US 2152863A, US-A-2152863, US2152863 A, US2152863A
InventorsBills Claud H
Original AssigneeBills Claud H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sand, water, and oil segregator
US 2152863 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 4, 1939. c. H. BILLS SAND, WATER. AND OIL SEGREGATOR Filed Dec. 7, 1937 lllllll I/VVE/V TOR.

Curuo h. Ems.

/l T TOR/105x Patented Apr. 4, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT oFFIcE 2 Claims.

This invention relates to a water, sand and oil segregator, which is located adjacent to producing wells, and ahead of the production and shipping tanks.

The purpose of this invention is to separate entrained sand or entrained water from the fluid produced from the well, and to provide a novel means for the withdrawal of the sand or water which is separated.

An object of my invention is to provide a novel heater for the purpose of separating entrained sand or water from the oil, and the heated oil in the cleaning process is delivered hot to the shipping tanks, and retains sufficient heat to facilitate pumping and shipping operations.

Still another object is to provide a novel device of the character stated, which will effectively remove entrained sand or water from the oil produced from the well, and further, to continuously remove the sand or water while the well is producing.

Still another object is to provide a novel segregator of the character stated, in which the fluid produced from the well is divided into small globules, whereby the sand and water is effectively removed from the oil.

Other objects, advantages and features of invention may appear from the accompanying drawing, the subjoined detailed description and the appended claims.

In the drawing Figure l is a longitudinal sectional View of the segregator.

Figure 2 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view of the perforated hood and balancing column.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary bottom plan view of the intake pipe.

Referring more particularly to the drawing, the numeral 1 indicates an outer tank. The tank is provided with a cone bottom 2, which is preferably integrally formed with the tank. The tank is supported on a base 3, substantially as shown. An intake head 4 is mounted above the tank I, and the intake pipe 5 from the well extends into the head 4. The pipe 5 is substantially horizontal, and is provided with oppositely arranged outlet slots 6.

A baffle plate 1 extends over the upper slot so that the oil is deflected downwardly, and is prevented from cutting the upper portion of the head l. A conduit 8 extends from the bottom of the head 4, through the top of the tank I, and into the upper end of the balancing column 9. The balancing column 9 is arranged centrally in the tank I, and extends substantially the length of the tank.

A plurality of spreader rings II] are arranged at the lower end of the balancing column 9, and these rings are perforated substantially as shown in Figure 2, for the purpose of allowing the oil and entrained sand or water to pass outwardly into the tank. The rings l0 are successively smaller in diameter, the purpose being to reduce the velocity of the fluid as will be further described.

Heating coils ll surround the rings H) on the outside thereof, and the uppermost coils vent inwardly as attached to the lower end of the coil l2, within the balancing column 9. Steam or water is pumped into the lowermost coil il passes upwardly through the successive coils, thence into the coil !2, and is exhausted through the upper pipe l3. Thus the coils H and I2 are connected in series, and a temperature is maintained in these coils to suit the characteristics of the oil which is being treated.

A skimming outlet pipe l4 extends from the pipe I, adjacent the upper end thereof, and this pipe extends to the stock tanks. The water, sand, and the like, is withdrawn from the bottom of the cone 2, through the pipe IS. The clean oil outlet 14. is arranged in the tank I, below any foam which may accumulate on the oil surface.

A gas transfer pipe l6 extends from the top of the head 4 and into the top of the tank I. so that the separated gas will be returned to the oil and will mingle with the outgoing clean oil, for the purpose of maintaining the original gravity of the oil.

In operation, the cone bottom 2 is filled with water, preferably as produced by the well, and this water covers the perforated spreader rings ID. This water is maintained at a temperature to suit the characteristics of the oil which is being treated. The oil from the well which enters through the pipe 5 is expanded and separated from the entrained gas within the head 4, and at approximately the flow line temperature. This feature is noteworthy, since the application of heat to the oil before the separation of the gas would increase the amount of wet gas given off, and thus tend to impoverish the oil and reduce its gravity.

The gas rises in the head 4 and passes through the pipe l6 into the top of the tank I. The oil flows downwardly through the pipe 8, and into the balancing column l2. This oil is gradually heated by the coil l2, and also the velocity of the downwardly flowing oil is reduced because of the baflle action of the coil l2. Upon reaching the perforated rings II], the oil comes into contact with the heated wash Water I I in the cone 2. The temperature of the oil is increased causing rapid expansion, and the flow is divided into fine streams or globules, as it passes through the perforations in said rings.

In passing outwardly, the oil also contacts the heated coils II. In dividing the oil into fine streams or globules, a larger surface of the oil is exposed to the scrubbing action of the perforations and the hot wash water. Quick expansion breaks the encasing film around the entrained sand particles and. globules or water and releases them.

The flow dividing process and quick expansion are repeated in each of the rings l0, and the temperature continues to increase, since each succeeding superimposed ring is larger in diameter.

than the one below. The speed of flow of the oil is gradually reduced to assist the settling of sand and water. The oil passes upwardly in the tank I, and finally passes out through the pipe [4, to the stock tanks.

The gradual increase of the heat, together with the reduction of the velocity of the fluid during its passage through the balancing column, and through the perforated spreader rings are of importance in the elimination of the sand and water.

The sand which has been separated from the oil, settles to the bottom of the cone 2, and thewater separated from the oil, becomes part of the wash water. The accumulated water and sand is drawn off as required, through the pipe l5.

In actual operation, on one well, the original fluid from the well contained 4% of mud and sand and water passing through the segregator. This was reduced to 0.4%.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A sand, water and oil segregator comprising a tank, a balancing column within the tank extending longitudinally thereof and substantially central within the tank, said balancing column terminating above the bottom of the tank, oil intake means at the upper end of the balancing column, a plurality of superimposed perforated rings fixedly attached tothe lower end of the column, said rings being of different diameters and the uppermost ring opening into the bottom of the balancing column, a heating coil surrounding each of the rings, a heating coil within the balancing column, said last named heating coil being connected to the first named coils, a drain at the lower end of the tank, and a clean oil outlet adjacent the upper end of the tank.

2. A sand, water and oil segregator comprising a tank, a balancing column within the tank and extending longitudinally thereof, intake means at the upper end of the balancing column, a plurality of superimposed perforated rings fixedly attached to the lower end of the balancing column, said perforated rings being positioned above the bottom of the tank, the perforations in said rings being arranged on the periphery of each of the rings, all of said rings being inter-connected,

a. heating coil surrounding each of the rings and arranged around the periphery of each of the rings, a heating coil within the balancing column, a drain at the lower end of the tank and a clean oil outlet adjacent the upper end of the tank.

CLAUD H. BILLS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2656925 *Jun 15, 1950Oct 27, 1953Johnson Cecil CEmulsion treater
US2706015 *Oct 15, 1953Apr 12, 1955Superior Tank & Construction CWash tank and gas separator
US2751998 *Jun 1, 1953Jun 26, 1956Nat Tank CoEmulsion treaters and emulsion treating methods
US3295681 *Oct 4, 1963Jan 3, 1967Frigid Units IncWater cooling and aerating device for fish tanks and the like
US4135946 *Feb 3, 1978Jan 23, 1979Casey John APurification of cane sugar juice
US4336136 *Jun 2, 1980Jun 22, 1982Giguere Marcel LSystem for processing soils contaminated by crude oils or other refined petroleum products
US4387030 *Jun 19, 1981Jun 7, 1983Sauder Larry DFluid separation system
US4876015 *Aug 19, 1988Oct 24, 1989Cmi International, Inc.Method and apparatus for reclaiming used hydraulic fluid
US4971703 *Aug 21, 1989Nov 20, 1990Battelle Memorial InstituteTreatment method for emulsified petroleum wastes
US5100559 *Oct 25, 1990Mar 31, 1992Battelle Memorial InstituteTreatment methods for breaking certain oil and water emulsions
US5211856 *Mar 6, 1992May 18, 1993Hanshi ShenMethod of oil/water separation and device for purification of oil
US8163176 *Aug 24, 2009Apr 24, 2012Riles Edward HillContinuous sludge decant system
US8623221 *Apr 27, 2011Jan 7, 2014Keith L. BoydSand separator for petroleum and natural gas wells
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/180, 210/183, 210/774, 210/800, 210/187, 210/188, 210/519
International ClassificationE21B43/34
Cooperative ClassificationE21B43/34
European ClassificationE21B43/34