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Publication numberUS2153143 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1939
Filing dateJan 28, 1938
Priority dateJan 28, 1938
Publication numberUS 2153143 A, US 2153143A, US-A-2153143, US2153143 A, US2153143A
InventorsFigg Jr Louis J, Shaulis Edward E
Original AssigneeEastman Kodak Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nondiscoloring, liquid antiseptic soap
US 2153143 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

atente Apr. 4, 1939 2,153,143 nonmsooaorg n i onm ANTISEPTIC Louis J. Figg, Jr., and Edward E. Shaulis, Kingsport, Tenn, assignors to Eastman Kodak Company, heater, N. Y a corporation of New Jersey No Drawing. Application January 28, 1938, Serial No. 187,557

6 Claims. (Cl. 87-5) This invention relates to liquid, antiseptic soap, Example I]! and more particularly to liquid, antiseptic toilet Per cent soap. This application is in part a continuation by volume of our application Serial No. 100,087, filed Sep- Liquid saponified cocoanut oil soap 50.0

tember 9, 1936. Caustic-soluble hardwood oil 15.0 5

In the copending' application of one of us, Essential oils 3.0 Louis J. Figg, Jr., Serial No. 186,099, filed Jan. Ethyl alcohol 11.0 21, 1938, a liquid, antiseptic toilet soap has been Water -Q; 21.0

described, which comprises soap, a hardwood oil,

10 and a blending agent for the soap and the hardxample IV Per 10 good oil. The hardwood oil is purified either 5 b y distillation, only a fraction boiling between 180 C. and 240 C. being used, or by alkali treatgg ggiggggg g ggsgz a g soap ment, only the caustic-soluble portion of the oil Essential Oils 1 being used. Other substances, such, for instance, Ethy1a1coh1"" u 5 15 as pine tar oil and/or essential oils, may al Water be incorporated in the liquid soap. The hardwoodoil may suitably amount to from 0.5% to It will be understood that the proportions are 33%, by l of th liquid antiseptic soa,p by way of illustration only. Among the blending 20 We prefer to use from 5% to 15% of the harde s which We may use, e ay e t o o 20 wood oil. example, in addition to ethyl alcohol: methanol,

Such a soap has been found to darken in P DYI 911001101, isopropyl lcohol, the butyl a1 color in the light and air, because of some change hols, t y alcohols. t yl a tat t yl a ein the hardwood oil, which presumably becomes tote. propyl acetate, s pr p l acetate, the buty oxidized to some xt t, Alth h t darkenacetates, the amyl acetates, acetone, methyl ace- 25 ing does not impair the usefulness of the antitone, m t yl thyl ket n et p py t septic soap, it detracts from its appearance and, e y ketone, methyl ty ketone, dlbutyl hence from its salability, I ketone, methyl amyl ketone, ethylene glycol, pro- One object of our invention is to provide a hyle'ne lycol, di thy ly l, ethylene ly liquid, antiseptic soap containing hardwood oil, monomethyl o e ylene glycol monoethyl 30 which will not darken in the li ht a d i Qther ether, ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, diethylene objects will hereinafter appean glycol monomethyl ether,diethylene glycol mono- We have discovered that if a small amount ethyl ether, and die ene lyco monobuty of a halide selected from the group consisting etherof the iodides and bromides of potassium, sodium, T0 ch a s ap we add, to pr v it caesium, lithium, barium, strontium, calcium and darkening. fr m 0- r m t -30 am. pr magnesium is add d to a, liquid, antiseptic p erably 0.25 gram, of an iodide or bromide of containing a hardwood oil, darkening of the oil, Potassium, Sodium. a t barium. and consequently of the soap, on contact with Strontium calcium or magnesium P 100 light and air is prevented, We have found such amounts to be very eil'ective. 40

As examples of a liquid, antiseptic toilet soa It is best to dissolve the halide in some of the containing a hardwood oil, we give the following Water used in making up he soap comformulae: position, as it' has only a limited solubility in Example I the liquid antiseptic soap. P t Hardwood oil whose boiling range is between 45 by volume 180 C. and 240 C. may be prepared as described Liquid saponifled coooanut oil soap. 50.0 in the Figg application referred to above. Name- Hardwood oils 7.5 hr. the heavy oils and tars which settle out of p nil 7,5 the raw pyroligneous acid resulting from the s ti l oils 3,0 destructive distillation-of hardwood, which have 50 Ethyl alcohol 11.0 oi ing ranges from 170 C. to 310 C., may be Water 21,0 charged into a vacuum still heated by circulating oil, and fractionated through a plate column Example H Per cent of approximately 15 plates. The fraction whose byvolume boiling range at atmospheric pressure is 180}- 55 Liquid saponified cocoanut oil soap 52 240 C., approximately, is collected and re-dis- Hardwood oil=pine-tar oil mixture (1:1)"..- 12 tilled in a vacuum still heated by steam coils, Essential oils 1 the fraction which, at atmospheric pressure, Ethyl alc l5 boils above 180 0. being collected.

Water I 20 Caustic-soluble hardwood oil may be prepared 60 from the same starting materials, for instance in ,the manner described in the Figg application sodium salts is then treated with carbon dioxide gas to liberate the acidic components as oils, and to convert any free sodium hydroxide present to sodium carbonate and bicarbonate. The oils are then steam distilled from the mixture.

-While carbon dioxide liberatesa satisfactory quality of caustic-soluble wood oil, which does not possess certain of the disadvantageous characteristics of caustic-soluble wood oil liberated by sulfuric acid, the use of carbon dioxide is relatively expensive. We have found that the use of acetic acid in place of carbon dioxide produces a wood oil at least 'assatisfactory as that produced by the carbon dioxide treatment, and is considerably more economical. Acetic acid is relatively cheap, and can be recovered, because upon reacting with the sodium salt of the caustic-soluble wood oil, it forms sodium acetate, which can later be decomposed by sulfuric acid to form acetic acid.

By way of illustration of the process in which we use acetic acid to replace either sulfuric acid or carbon dioxide, we give the following example.

To gallons of wood oil, resulting from the destructive distillation of wood and having a caustic solubility of from 50 to 60%, are added 12 gallons of 56% sodium hydroxide solution and 16 gallons of water. The mixture is allowed to stand for one hour. The greater portion of the neutral oil separates, and is withdrawn mechanically. The

- remainder of the neutral oil is removed from the 7 solution of caustic-soluble oil by steam distilla tion. The neutral oil may be discarded or separately stored. To liberate the caustic-soluble oil from the aqueous solution of its sodium salts, 250

lbs. of 56% acetic acid is added. The greater portion'of the oil which separates can be withdrawn mechanically, and the remainder by,steam distillation. caustic alkali-may be used instead of sodium hydroxide. The alkali acetate remaining in the aqueous solution may be recovered by means of sulfuric acid.

What we claim as our invention and desire to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States 1. A liquid, antiseptic toilet soap comprising It will be' understood that another soap, water, hardwood oil whose boiling range is between 180 C. and 240C. in a proportion which would otherwise cause substantial darkening thereof, a blending agent for the soap and the hardwood oil, and a halide selected from the 5 group consisting of the bromides and iodides of potassium, sodium, caesium, lithium, barium, strontium, calcium, and magnesium, in sufllcient quantity to prevent the wood oil from darkening in the light and air.

2. A liquid, antiseptic toilet soap comprising soap, water, from 0.5% to 33% by volume of hardwood oil whose boiling range is between 180 C. and 240 0., a blending agent for the soap and the hardwood oil, and from 0.20 to 0.30 gram, per 15 100 cubic centimeters, of a halide selected from the group consisting of the bromides and iodides of potassium, sodium, caesium, lithium, barium, strontium, calcium and magnesium.

3. A liquid, antiseptic toilet soap comprising 20 soap, water, caustic-soluble hardwood oil in a proportion which would otherwise cause substantial darkening thereof, a blending agent for the. soap and the hardwood oil, and a halide selected from the group consisting of the bromides and iodides of potassium, sodium, caesium, lithium, barium, strontium, calcium and magnesium, in sufiicientquantity to prevent the Wood 011 from darkening inthe light and air.

4. A liquid, antiseptic toilet soap comprising", soap, water, from 0.5% to 33% by volume of! caustic-soluble hardwood oil, a blending agent for the soap and the hardwood oil, and from 0.20 to 0.30 gram, per 100 cubic centimeters, of a halide selected from the group consisting oi! the 35 bromides and iodides of potassium, sodium, caesium, lithium, barium, strontium, calcium and magnesium.

.5. A .iiquid, antiseptic toilet soap comprising soap, water, ethyl alcohol, from 0.5% to 33% by volume of hardwood oil whose boiling range is between 180 C. and 240 0., and from 0.20 to.0.30 gram, per 100 cubic centimeters, of a halide selected from" the group consisting of the bromides and iodides of potassium, sodium, caesium, lithium, barium, strontium, calcium and magnesium.

6. A liquid, antiseptic toilet soap comprising soap, water, ethyl alcohol, from 0.5% to 33% by volume of caustic-soluble hardwood oil, and from 0.20 to 0.30 grim, per'100 cubic centimeters, of a halide selected from the group consisting of the bromides and iodides of potassium, sodium,

' caesium, lithium,'barium, strontium, calcium and magnesium.

LOUIS J. FIGG, JRJ'.

EDWARD E. SHAULIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2507649 *Apr 29, 1947May 16, 1950Universal Oil Prod CoTreatment of wood tar distillates
US4589994 *Dec 17, 1984May 20, 1986Moseman Roger ECleaning, deodorizing, fungistats
US4668419 *May 2, 1986May 26, 1987Moseman Roger ECleaning, deodorizing, hydroxypolyalkyleneoxyalkylbenzene, amine oxide, fatty acid salt, phenolic antifungal, terpene oil
US5908619 *Jan 9, 1997Jun 1, 1999Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyHydroalcoholic compositions thickened using surfactant/polymer complexes
US5951993 *Jan 9, 1997Sep 14, 1999Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyComprising a lower alcohol and water and solid hydrophobic and hydrophilc emulsifiers; skin disinfection such as presurgical hand preps, patient preps, lotions and presurgical scrub replacement
US6019997 *Jan 9, 1997Feb 1, 2000Minnesota Mining And ManufacturingIncludes a lower alcohol and water in a weight ratio of at least about 20:80, a pharmaceutical agent, and an emulsifier system
US6090395 *Jan 9, 1997Jul 18, 2000Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanySkin antiseptics; alcohol and chlorhexidine digluconate, with thickener
US6352701May 27, 1999Mar 5, 20023M Innovative Properties CompanyStable hydroalcoholic compositions
US6534069Jun 8, 1999Mar 18, 20033M Innovative Properties CompanyDisinfectant, antimicrobial hand lotion comprising thickener, emulsifier, lower alcohol and water
US6562360Dec 10, 2001May 13, 20033M Innovative Properties CompanyUseful as skin disinfectants, surgical hand preparations, patient skin preparations and antimicrobial hand lotions
US6582711Jan 9, 1997Jun 24, 20033M Innovative Properties CompanyAn antimicrobial hydroalcoholic composition comprising hydroalcoholic solvent system comprising a lower alcohol and water in a weight ratio of at least about 50:50; a thickener system comprising at least one cationic or nonionic polymeric
US6610315Feb 14, 2002Aug 26, 20033M Innovative Properties CompanyMixture of alcohol and water; presurgery scrub
US6623744 *Feb 14, 2002Sep 23, 20033M Innovative Properties CompanyFor hand preparation such as a lotion or as a presurgical scrub replacement
US7081246 *Sep 4, 2003Jul 25, 20063M Innovative Properties CompanyStable hydroalcoholic compositions
US7566460Jul 25, 2006Jul 28, 20093M Innovative Properties CompanyHand lotion and surgical scrub; alcohol, chlorhexidine salt, and emulsifier
US7803390Jan 26, 2006Sep 28, 20103M Innovative Properties CompanyStable hydroalcoholic compositions
US8062649Jun 17, 2003Nov 22, 20113M Innovative Properties CompanyHydroalcoholic compositions thickened using polymers
Classifications
U.S. Classification510/131, 510/508, 510/505, 510/159, 510/386, 252/404, 510/463, 510/108
International ClassificationC11D17/08, C11D3/48, C11D9/10, C11D9/04, C11D9/38
Cooperative ClassificationC11D3/48, C11D9/045, C11D17/08, C11D9/10, C11D9/38
European ClassificationC11D3/48, C11D9/38, C11D9/10, C11D17/08, C11D9/04B