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Publication numberUS2153441 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1939
Filing dateMay 19, 1937
Priority dateMay 19, 1937
Publication numberUS 2153441 A, US 2153441A, US-A-2153441, US2153441 A, US2153441A
InventorsTillotson Neil E
Original AssigneeTillotson Neil E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluid container and method of producing
US 2153441 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 4, 1939. N. E. TILLOTSON FLUID CONTAINER AND METHOD OF PRODUCING Filed May 19, 1937 Patented Apr. 4, 1939 UNITED STATES FLUID CONTAINER AND METHOD OF PRODUCING Neil E. Tillotson, Watertown, Mass.

Application May 19, 1937, Serial No. 143,570

3 Claims.

durable, unlikely to leak or burst, and much superior to the conventional type of rubber product normally employed for this purpose.

For the accomplishment of this and other purposes, the invention consists in certain novel features hereinafter described and claimed, the advantages of which will be obvious to those skilled in the art from the following description.

In the accompanying drawing illustrating essentially the method of carrying out the invention, Fig. 1 represents a fabric base having the general contour of a hot water bottle before impregnation; Fig. 2 illustrates the same base in distended condition after waterproofing; Fig. ,3 illustrates a finished hot water bottle after removal of the form and turning inside out; and Figs. 4, 5 and 6 are details illustrating in large sections as indicated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3.

As shown in the illustrated embodiment of the invention, I have provided a fabric bag or container which may be constructed of flannel or similar soft napped material, and have coated this bag interiorly with rubber to prevent the contents from leaking therethrough, without altering the physical characteristics externally of the flannel bag. -I accomplish this result by first producing a bag form of flannel with the napped surfaces of the flannel opposing one another, and the whole closed by a stitched seam which permanently joins in assembled relation the separate pieces of which the bag is composed. I then impregnate and waterproof the exposed surface of this flannel bag while the latter is held distended on a form. Having thus impregnated and waterproofed the surface by a suitable coating of rubber either in the form of latex, cured or uncured, or a water dispersion of rubber, and vulcanized the coating if necessary, I remove the form, turn the bag inside out to expose the napped untreated surface, and

' locate the rubber coating on the inside. Follow- Referring particularly to the illustrated embodiment of the invention as shown in Fig. 1, two similar pieces of cotton flannel are stitched together at 6 to provide a body portion 2 and a neck portion 4, with the napped surface at the inside. i

As indicated in the same figure, 2. lug 8 may be incorporated if desired to provide means in the finished container for hanging up.

As evident from the drawing, the seam is allowed to project and is subsequently covered in the im- 10 pregnating process. It is obvious that if so desired the seam might be trimmed or flattened or modified to obviate the ridge which is otherwise produced. However, this ridge being located in the interior of the container when finished constitutes no detriment to the appearance or functioning of the container,

Having formed the fabric container, a collapsible form composed of two similar sections it and I6 and a cooperating wedge I8'are inserted within the container and assembled in a manner to distend the latter for the impregnating process. These sections may be inserted one at a time, a cooperating tongue and groove formed at their lower ends aiding in keeping the extremities in alignment. With this arrangement the-container is suitably distended and the neck portion is effectively closed against entry of liquid "due to the fact that the upper ends of the cooperating sections and the wedge are of uniform thickness, presenting when assembled opposite plane surfaces.

After distention the fabric container is immersed in a suspension of rubber latex, cured or uncured, to form a coating thereon. The purpose of this immersion is to waterproof and coat the exposed surface of the container without causing a complete penetration to the opposite side in a manner to interfere with the napped surface. This is accomplished by suitably adjusting the strength of the suspension and the period of immersion. After the desired coating of latex has been produced by one or more immersions, the latter may be cured if necessary, and the form thereafter removed. Subsequently the container is turned inside out to place the coated surface upon the inside of the container and the napped surface upon the outside. Finally the container may be finished by trimming the neck to shape and providing an inserted grommet with the usual closure member.

This method as above described produces a hot water bottle which is simple in construction, and economical in labor and material. It is also exceedingly safe and durable, as the rubber is enclosed and reinforced by the surrounding 55 fabric. The napped exterior is attractive in appearance and adds measurably to the comfort and pleasure of the user. The hot water bottle itself is extremely flexible, light in weight, and is comparably much stronger than a similar a1l-= rubber bottle of equal or greater weight. It completely obviates the wet, slimy and clammy feeling of the usual rubber bottle when liquid is spilled thereon or leakage occurs.

Although described in connection with a hot water bottle, it will be evident to those skilled in the art that the method is equally applicable to other fluid containers employed for a similar or equivalent purpose.

What is claimed is:

1. The method of producing a flexible hot water bag, which consists in cutting and joining a napped fabric to form a bag closed except for a mouth opening at one end and with the napped surfaces at the inside of the bag, distending the bag through a collapsible form inserted through the opening, closing the mouth of the bag to prevent entry of liquid, dipping the exposed surface of the bag in rubber latex to thoroughly coat the exposed surface of the bag exteriorly, curing the latex coating, removing the form, and turning the bag right side out to expose the untreated napped surface and locate the rubber coating at the inside of the bag.

mea er 2. A flexible hot water bag of the character produced by the method recited in claim 1, further characterized by a grommet positioned Within the mouth opening of the bag and provided with a closure member.

3. The method of producing a flexible hot water bag, which consists in cutting from napped fabric two identical blanks each of which is shaped to form one side of the body and the mouth of the bag, joining the blanks at the margins of the body and the sides only of the mouth to form a bag closed except for the open end of the mouth with the napped surfaces at the inside of the bag, shaping the bag to form smooth, rounded internal surfaces symmetrical with the joined margins, closing the opening in the mouth of the bag to prevent entry of liquid, dipping the bag in a suspension of rubber latex of proper strength and for a proper length of time to thoroughly coat the exposed exterior surface of the bag and to cause only a partial penetration of the latex through the thickness of the fabric, curing the latex coating, the dipping and curing steps being performed while the bag is shaped as above described, and turning the bag right side out to expose the untreated napped surface and locate the rubber coating at the inside of the bag.

NEIL E. TEELOTSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2906638 *Jul 9, 1954Sep 29, 1959Us Rubber CoMethod of coating seamless braided glass fiber tubes
US3610307 *Oct 31, 1969Oct 5, 1971Continental Gummi Werke AgHollow bodies of rubber and rubberlike vulcanizable synthetic materials
US6890102Apr 3, 2003May 10, 2005Kool Wraps, L. L. C.Gift bag with napped filamentary surface
US7018100Dec 14, 2004Mar 28, 2006Kool Wraps, L.L.C.Gift bag with napped filamentary surface
US7118276Mar 12, 2004Oct 10, 2006Kool Wraps, L.L.C.Gift bag with napped filamentary surface
US20040197032 *Mar 12, 2004Oct 7, 2004Elyse ClarkGift bag with napped filamentary surface
US20050100250 *Dec 14, 2004May 12, 2005Elyse ClarkGift bag with napped filamentary surface
WO1992001429A1 *Jul 24, 1991Feb 6, 1992Diego GislonProcess for manufacturing coated hot water containers and containers thus obtained
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/96, 264/313, 264/305, 264/257, 383/22
International ClassificationA61F7/08
Cooperative ClassificationA61F7/08
European ClassificationA61F7/08