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Publication numberUS2155083 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 18, 1939
Filing dateApr 7, 1937
Priority dateApr 7, 1937
Publication numberUS 2155083 A, US 2155083A, US-A-2155083, US2155083 A, US2155083A
InventorsDrewsen Pierre
Original AssigneeHinde & Dauch Paper Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roll clearing
US 2155083 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P. DREWSEN L CLEARING April 18, 1939.

Filed April 7, 1937 Pzcrrz e Dz muse/1 8 0W 3 v v TATTSE EYS Patented Apr. 18, 1939 PATENT OFFICE ROLL CLEARING Pierre Drewsen, Sandusky, Ohio, assignor to The Hinde & Danch Paper Company, Sandusky, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application April 7, 1937, Serial No. 135,466

10 Claims.

This invention, which is a continuation in part of my co-pending application Ser. No. 20,102, filed May 6, 1935, for Process of coloring paper,

now Patent No. 2,089,949, issued August 1'7, 1937,

relates particularly to certain apparatus therein disclosed and to further development of certain methods which are ancillary to the main purposes of my previous invention.

While this invention is of particular utility in the paper industry, and is herein disclosed in relation thereto, the method and the mechanism include features not limited to that industry. Hence I wish it understood that bydescription and explanation herein I do not intend to exclude uses of my invention in other fields and in its broader aspects.

In particular, this invention relates to an improved method, and apparatus for'its practice,

for preventing accumulation of coloring material, ink or like substances on the rollers of a machine for coloring or printing paper, and especially paper to be used in the manufacture of cormgated and solid fiber boxes, merchandise display stands, display materials, and the like.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, the invention, then, comprises the features hereinafter fully described, and particularly pointed out in the claims, the following description and the annexed drawing setting forth in detail certain illustrative embodiments of .the invention, these being indicative however, of but a few of the various ways in which the principle of the invention may be employed.

In the accompanying drawing, which is in diagrammatic style,

Fig. l is an elevation of one type of apparatus to which my invention is applicable;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged isometric view of parts of the apparatus of Fig. 1, showing one form of my invention applied thereto;

Figs. 3, 4 and 5 are similar isometric views, showing modified applications of my invention. Figs. 4 and 5 illustrate one end only, it being understood that both ends are alike.

Although my invention, whether considered as apparatus or as method, is adaptable to a variety .of situations, as suggested above, I herein describe and illustrate it in relation to a color-printing apparatus such as described in my co-pending application Serial No. 20,102, filed May 6, 1935, (Patent No. 2,089,949) from which Fig. 1 is taken, slightly simplified, and from which Fig. 2 is copied exactly.

The apparatus of Fig. 1 illustrates specifically though diagrammatically and with slight diilfer-- ences in detail, the paper-coloring machine of my. application Serial No. 20,102, wherein the supply roll A furnishes the web of paper W through a pair of smoothing friction bars B and over a guide roll C to a stand of rolls E, F, G, 5 where one side is colored and printed, and from which the webgoes arounda dryer I, preferably a stationary steam heated drum contacting only the uncolored back of the paper, the amount of drying contact being regulated by the roller J 10 adjustable as indicated by the arc K.

The printing roll stand here shown includes a hard smooth roller E, a resilient roller F, and a printing roller G running in the fountain H and applying color, and a pattern if desired, to the face of the web W. Details of construction and operation of the above apparatus as set up for two-tone or self-shaded coloring and pattern printing will be found in my application Serial No. 20,102. It will become apparent as the description proceeds that certain of the features and principles of my invention are not limited to printing and coloring, but may be employed in apparatus for other purposes, such as applyingglue, sizing, waterproofing, greaseproofing, and various other surface treatments.

Coloring material, generally designated as ink, is carried up by roll G and applied to the web W against the squeeze of roll F. In Figs. 2 to 5 inclusive the ink is indicated by stippling. The ink of course gets onto the-terminal zones L of roll F, while the mid-zone M is protected by the web W. It is important for many reasons to prevent ink getting onto the back of the .web, but the ink has a natural tendency to creep towards the zone M.

My simplest means of counteracting such creeping tendency is illustrated in Fig. 3 of my application Serial No. 20,102, reproduced as Fig. 2- hereln, and consists of blast nozzles N directed at an outward angle against roll F at the boundaries between zones M and L.

For some materials this is sufficient, but with most inks the drying caused by the blast builds up a ring of hardened ink which gives rise to such ill effects as separation of ,the rolls and localized wear on rolls G and E against the hard ink ring.

To prevent the formation of such an elevated ring, I apply a solvent for transferred ink on the terminal zones to counteract the evaporative effect. The amount required is small and does not in practice result in harmful dilution of ink in the fountain H. With a water-soluble ink the result may be accomplished by steam jets issuing from the nozzles N.

Another means of applying solvent is through a plurality of drip nozzles arranged above roll E in sets on each side of the web W, and preferably individually valved, to supply solvent which is carried down to the bite between rolls E and F where it acts to keep the ink soft in the zones L so as to remain amenable to the action of blast from the nozzles N Various alternatives are possible. For example, Fig. 4 illustrates a solvent supply pipe P feeding to the edge of the zone L just in advance of blast nozzle N. The solvent delivered by P could be in the form either of a drip, a minute stream, 'or a spray, as warranted by conditions.

In Fig. 5 there is a broad-mouthed nozzle N from which a solvent-charged blast is directed against the zone L. In this figure the entraining of solvent in the blast is diagrammatically shown by the solvent feed pipe P entering the blast pipe Q above the nozzle N From the foregoing it will be seen that I have devised a method which may be variously carried out, and forms of apparatus for practice.

of the method, which has immediate application to the fields of coloring and printing on mnning webs, and which results in a superior product by reason 'of confining the ink or other agent to areas where it is wanted, and prevention of harm to the machinery. 1

Other modes of applying the principle of the invention may be employed, change being made as regards the details described, provided the features stated in any of the following claims, or the equivalent of such, be employed.

I therefore particularly point out and distinctly claim as my invention:

1. In a cylinder apparatus for applying liquid to a web, means for preventing the encroachment of applied liquid upon certain cylinder area, said means including a fluid blast directed upon the margins of said areas and tending away from said areas.

2. In a cylinder apparatus for applying liquid to a web, means for preventing the encroachment of applied liquid upon certain cylinder areas, said means including a fluid blast directed upon the margins of said areas and tending away from said areas, and a means supplying solvent for said liquid upon said cylinder areas.

3. In, an apparatus for applying liquid to a web wherein the web is pressed between upper and lower cylinders longer than web width, the lower of which carries liquid to the face of the web, means for preventing encroachment of liquid upon the back of the web, said means comprising in combination a blast nozzle directed upon the upper cylinder at the inner edge of the zone beyond the web, and means applying solvent to said zone.

4. In an apparatus for applying liquid to a web wherein the web is pressed between upper and lower cylinders longer than web width, the lower of which carries liquid to the face-of the web, means for preventing encroachment of liquid upon the back ofthe web, said means comprising in combination'a blast nozzle directed upon the upper cylinder at the inner edge of the zone beyond the web, and a solvent-supply pipe adjacent said blast nozzle.

5. In an apparatus for applying liquid to a web wherein the web is pressed between upper and lower cylinders longer than web width, the lower of which carries liquid to the face of the web, means for preventing encroachment of liquid upon the back of the web, said means comprising in combination a blast nozzle directed upon the upper cylinder at the inner edge of the zone beyond the web, and a solvent-supply pipe adjacent and in advance of said blast nozzle.

6. In an apparatus for applying liquid to a web wherein the web is pressed. between upper and lower cylinders longer than web width, the lower of which carries liquid to the face of the web, means for preventing encroachment of liquid upon the back of the web, said means comprising in combination a blast nozzle directed upon the upper cylinder at the inner edge of the zone beyond the web, and means for entraining solvent in the blast from said nozzle.

'7. In a three-high printing roll stand, adapted for work upon a web narrower than roll length, means for preventing accumulation of ink on the end zones of the middle roll, said means comprising outward blast nozzles upon the end zones of the middle roll and an ink-solvent supply upon the .corresponding end zones of the top roll.

8. A method of roll clearing in apparatus of the character described, said method comprising applying a moving force to liquid in directions away from space to be kept clear, and applying solvent to said liquid.

9. A method of roll clearing in apparatus of the character described, said method comprising simultaneouslymaintaining the fluidity of ink and moving ink along the roll away from that zone of the non-ink-carrying rolls which contacts the web back. v

10. A method of roll clearing in apparatus of the character described, said method comprising transferring ink solvent from an upper roll to ink-coated zones of a middle roll and applying a constant impulse against ink upon said middle roll in a direction away from the portion which is to be kept clear.

PIERRE DREWSEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2478230 *Feb 17, 1945Aug 9, 1949American Viscose CorpLiquid treatment apparatus for yarns
US2653566 *Jan 18, 1951Sep 29, 1953Worden Elmer JWeb coating machine
US2770294 *May 14, 1954Nov 13, 1956Colgate Palmolive CoApparatus for processing liquid material
US2894856 *Aug 31, 1956Jul 14, 1959Inland Steel CoApparatus for and method of controlling the coating thickness in continuous galvanizing
US3149005 *Jan 6, 1960Sep 15, 1964West Virginia Pulp & Paper CoAdjustable mounted, reciprocating doctor device including blade and air blast means
US3195500 *Aug 29, 1962Jul 20, 1965Kimberly Clark CoAbrasive work back-up to recondition doctor blade
US3279424 *Nov 2, 1960Oct 18, 1966Champion Papers IncApparatus for coating webs with polymerizable materials
US4933215 *Feb 27, 1989Jun 12, 1990Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Method and apparatus for coating webs
US5484482 *Mar 23, 1994Jan 16, 1996Valmet Paper Machinery, Inc.Method and apparatus for limiting the coating width and/or preventing damage to roll ends while coating or surface-sizing paper
US5567481 *Jan 25, 1995Oct 22, 1996Yu; Tom Y.Apparatus and method for coating and drying paper sheets
US5630908 *Sep 22, 1994May 20, 1997Valmet CorporationMethod in the operation of a doctor in a paper/board machine
US5806136 *Nov 5, 1996Sep 15, 1998Valmet CorporationDevice in the operation of a doctor in a paper/board machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/33, 134/36, 118/70, 101/420, 101/416.1, 118/235, 118/249, 118/59, 134/37
International ClassificationB41M1/10
Cooperative ClassificationB41M1/10
European ClassificationB41M1/10