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Publication numberUS2156502 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1939
Filing dateJun 19, 1937
Priority dateJun 19, 1937
Publication numberUS 2156502 A, US 2156502A, US-A-2156502, US2156502 A, US2156502A
InventorsLawton Frank H
Original AssigneeLawton Frank H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wrapping paper fixture
US 2156502 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1939- F. H. LAWTON WRAPPING PAPER FIXTURE Filed June 19, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet l y 1939- F. H. LAWTON 2,156,502

WRAPPING PAPER FIXTURE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 19, 1937 FIG.

5 Q INVE NTOR Patented May 2, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 9 Claims.

The present invention relates to certain new and useful improvements in a wrapping paper fixture and embodies a spring actuated, manually operated, strip feeding and cutting device,

wherein a pair of spring urged gripping jaws are carried by a pair of arms spaced apart to straddle a roll of paper, and said arms are swingingly mounted and spring urged away from the roll of paper towards which they are manually movable by the simple procedure of pressing against an apron carried by the pivotally mounted jaw of said pair, whichsingle effort opens said gripping jaws and advances them towards the roll of paper from which a leading strip 15 passes between the gripping jaws. Upon release of the gripping jaws, the leading strip of paper is quickly grasped therebetween and the gripping jaws move away from the roll of paper and carry the leading strip away from the roll which 90 isthereby caused to turn by the spring urged movement of said arms which carry the gripping jaws.

One or both of the gripping jaws serves as a blade for manually tearing the paper, and after a the paper is thus torn away, the leading strip is held between the gripping jaws and immediately ready for delivery thereby when said jaws are again opened and swingingly moved towards the roll of paper and then released; whereupon 3 the gripping jaws will grasp the paper and effectively deliver a free end of suflicient length to afford a convenient grasp, so that any desired amount of paper can be manually unwound from the roll and then torn off against the blade of the gripping jaws which efiectively hold the paper in close contact with the blade for eflicient and straight tearing.

The device is simple in construction, and the parts are so arranged that none of the instrumentalities project beyond the vertical tangent to the front of the full roll of paper; which feature is of paramount importance, for the reason that it prevents tearing of the clothing and snagging of the skin of workers who crowd past each other in narrow aisles where wrapping paper fixtures are commonly situated.

The invention also embodies improved constructions for accommodating thin flimsy wrap-- ping paper which is easily flexed. For this purpose, in close proximity to said gripping jaws, there is provided a support member over which the leading strip of paper is passed, and means is provided for holding the leading strip in close contact to said support so that there will be no 55 inopportune movement or flexing of the leading strip which is thereby held at a point sufficiently near to the gripping jaws so as to preclude the flexing and buckling which would otherwise occur were the leading strip not mechanically held in close proximity to the gripping jaws. I

The invention also embodies an improved construction and arrangement of the parts wherein the center of gravity is displaced rearwardly of the center of the device so as to thereby effectively resist the force which is inherent to the 10 forward pull exerted when the paper is unwound from the roll. This construction materially lessens the common fault of such fixtures to become rickety. The same improved construction eliminates the usual necessity for an expansive base or feet which are in general use on such devices, and also eliminates the necessity for end standards reaching above the top of the roll of paper and also eliminates the head rail generally used to connect such end standards; and at the same time provides a more sturdy and durable device which is more compact and also of more elegant appearance.

In the present disclosure the invention is shown so that it can be readily applied to the various wrapping paper fixtures in general use; and is also shown in the preferred form which constitutes a unitary structure as a whole.

The accompanying drawings show the best modes which have been devised, including the form in which the invention has been reduced to practice and marketed; and it will be understood that changes may be made without departing from the principle and scope of the invention defined in the appended claims.

Fig. 1 is a front elevation partly in section, showing the invention applied to a wrapping paper fixture in general use.

Fig. 2 is a vertical section taken on the line 2 of Fi 1.

Fig. 3 is a vertical section showing the invention applied to a conventional wrapping paper fixture, and including the strip supporting member and a gravity contacting member therefor; the strip feeding and cutting device being shown in manually operated position.

Fig. 4 is a front elevation, partly in section, showing the preferred form of the invention in total, and including the strip deflecting member and a spring contact therefor.

Fig. 5 is a vertical section taken on the line 5 of Fig. 4, and with the wrapper roll shown in phantom.

Fig. 6 is a vertical section showing a different mode of applying the invention to a conventional wrapping paper fixture, and with the wrapper roll shown in phantom.

In carrying out my invention I employ the strip feeding and cutting device which is co]- lectively designated as the unit P, and which is common to each of the several figures of the drawings. As best seen in Fig. 1 and Fig. 2 thisunit P comprises a blade 2 rigid with a pair of arms iii-l6 which are spaced apart and positioned astraddle the ends of a roll of wrapping paper such as W; and carried by these arms is a gripping jaw 22 pivoted as indicated at 2l2| and carrying an apron 25 which serves as a leverage plate for manually operating the gripping jaw on its pivots. The arms !5l6 are swingingly mounted as indicated at !i!'! and are spring urged as indicated at I8!8; and preferably, this same spring [8 also urges the jaw 22 against the blade 24; however, separate springs may be used for these two purposes, as is indicated at l8a and IS in Fig. 6. As will be apparent from Fig. 2, when hand pressure is exerted against the apron 25 the pivoted jaw 22 will be moved away from the blade 24, and further pressure will swing the entire unit P on the pivots I! and cause it to assume the position shown in Fig. 3 where the jaws are shown in open position. Suitable stop means such as S limit the opening of the jaws, and it should be mentioned that only slight opening is necessary, say about one sixteenth of an inch, which is sufiicient to assure that the leading strip of paper will pass freely between the jaws as indicated at L in Fig. 3. These jaws swing in an arc, and the extent of movement is limited by suitable stop means, such as indicated at S. This improved construction constitutes the strip feeding and cutting device collectively referred to as the unit P; and this device may be embodied in a wrapping paper fixture, or else applied to the various fixtures already in general use; and the drawings illustrate the preferred constructions for each 'of these purposes.

Figures 1 and 2 show a well known form of wrapping paper fixture wherein a pair of standards 5 are supported upon feet l0 and connected together by a head rail l each standard carries an open bearing member 6 for receiving the spindle l which passes through the axially bored wood cores 8 conventionally used in wrapping paper rolls such as W. To the head rail i of this conventional fixture, there is attached a pair of brackets l5i5 spaced apart to accommodate the previously described unit P; which is pivoted thereto as indicated at il||. These brackets l5 are provided with laterally extending wings or face plates l5a through which pass screws for attaching to the head rail l which is conventionally made of wood, and hence the user can quite readily make the installation to his own wrapping paper fixture; and for convenience in aligning, I preferably provide a small lip e to fit on the underside of the hand rail to thus assure proper positioning of the brackets relative to the head rail. Preferably, the face plates I5a are inwardly disposed, so as to provide for positioning the brackets at the extreme ends of the head rail; that is to say, so that the unit P can be full length of the wrapping paper fixture. For the convenience of illustration I have shown the fixture, the unit P and the wrapper roll W of different lengths, while in practice they are usually of corresponding lengths.

The wrapper roll W is rotatably mounted on the spindle 1 and as best seen in Fig. 2, a leading strip L is passed between the blade 24 and the jaw 22 which cooperates therewith to form a pair of gripping jaws for securely holding the leading strip L therebetween. It is essentially necessary to provide suitable means for holding the paper in roll formation, so that the leading strip will not uncoil when the gripping jaws are moved towards the roll. For this purpose I prefer to employ the U shaped rod 12 which has its two ends outwardly turned and pivoted in the standards 5, suitable springs l3 sufiicing to urge the member !2 against the wrapper roll W, at a point rearwardly of the crest thereof, and as near to the point where the leading strip L tangentially leaves the wrapper roll, as practical convenience can provide. This member l2 serves the two fold purpose of keeping the paper in roll formation and also acts as a brake to prevent excess rotation of the wrapper roll.

For convenience in passing the leading strip L between the gripping jaws, the jaw 22 is provided with a downwardly turned skirt 23 to facilitate entrance of the strip, and also to assure that when the wrapper roll is consumed to small diameter, that the leading strip will not drag over the edge of the gripping jaw 22 which must be of sufficient width to provide a support for the leading strip when the gripping jaws are opened in the intended operation of the device. The leading strip L is passed between the opened gripping jaws, which are then permitted to close so as to hold the paper in contact with the blade 24, which close contact assures efficient and straight tearing when the strip is manually torn in the well known manner. When the paper is thus torn off, the situation shown in Fig. 2 will be presented, and from the previous description it will be readily understood that when the hand of the operator is pressed against the apron 25, the gripping jaws will be opened to release the leading strip, and when the opened gripping jaws are swingingly moved towards the wrapper roll they will pass rearwardly along the strip L to a position such as shown in Fig. 3 where the leading strip L protrudes an amount equal to the extent of swinging movement of the opened gripping jaws, and it will be seen that this provides ample grasp for withdrawing the leading strip which may either be then grasped, or else, the operator may remove his hand from the device, whereupon the gripping jaws will promptly close upon the leading strip and then move forward to the initial position carrying the protruding strip forward, the springs !8-|8 having sufiicient tension to turn the wrapper roll. In either event, the protruding portion of the leading strip is then grasped and any desired amount of paper is unwound from the wrapper roll by the simple procedure of manually pulling the paper through the closed jaws, after which the paper is torn off against the blade 24; and preferably the jaw 22 is also pro vided with a cutting edge so that the paper may be torn by either an up or a down motion as the user may choose; and in either event, the paper is held in close contact with the cutting edge and consequently the tear will be efficient and straight.

Where heavy wrapping paper is used, the previously described instrumentalities are all that is required for efficient operation; however, where thin flimsy wrapping paper is used I provide additional structure for obviating the flexing and buckling which is inherent to light weight paper. For this purpose I support the leading strip on a line just rearwardly of the gripping jaws, and due to the short reach from the support to the gripping jaws there is practically no sag in the thin paper when the gripping jaws are opened; and when they are swingably moved backward, the short reach will assure that the paper will pass freely through the opened jaws without beingflexed or buckled as would otherwise occur were the leading strip not supported near the gripping jaws. This provision is essentially nec essary when'the wrapper roll is consumed to small diameter as illustrated .at D in Fig. 3 where it will be seen that the leading strip then tangentially leaves the wrapper roll at a point considerably below the gripping jaws.

Figure 3 shows a strip support 28 disposed par-' allel with the gripping jaws and approximately in line therewith. This support is preferably a round rod or pipe and it is desirable to loosely mount it for free turning as the paper is drawn over the same. As here shown, the strip support 28 is loosely mounted in a U-shaped projection 26 rising from the bracket 15, and of course, each end of the member 28 is similarly supported. In these same U-shaped projections 25 a gravity bar 21 is freely slidable up and down so as to yieldably hold the leading strip L in contact'with the strip support 28; and it should be mentioned that a hardwood slat is sufiicient for the required purpose intended for the gravity bar 21. This construction is simple, efiicient, economical, practical and convenient in use. It will be seen that when the wrapper roll is consumed, the strip support 28 and the gravity bar 27 can with facility be lifted out of the U-shaped support 21; and after a new wrapper roll is installed, the strip support 28 can with facility be dropped into place and the leading strip L passed thereover and between the opened gripping jaws, after which the gravity bar is dropped into place to hold the leading strip in contact with the support so as to preclude inopportune movement of the paper when the gripping jaws are swingingly moved rearwardly in the intended manner. It will be seen from Fig. 3 that this provision maintains a constant direction of the leading strip L irrespective of the variable inclination at which the paper tangentially leaves the wrapper roll, and that the paper is loosely held at a point sulficiently near to the gripping jaws to assure: that thin paper will neither sag, flex nor buckle in the intended operation of the gripping jaws.

Figure 3 also shows the most generally used tearing blade d which is conventionally supported by arms 2 attached to the head rail l and spring urged as indicated at 3; but here these conventional instrumentalities are used merely to hold the paper in roll formation and to obviate excess rotation of the wrapper roll, and it will be seen that these conventional elements are used in reverse position by the simple procedure of turning the fixture about and applying the brackets E on the side opposite to the member 4; which serves to illustrate the simplicity of applying the invention to this type of fixture which has for so many years been in general use.

In Figures 1, 2 and 3, it will be seen that the wrapper roll is supported on the center line of the standards 5, and due to the fact that a full roll of paper weighs several pounds, this presents an inaptitude which has long been known to cause these fixtures to become loose and rickety,

not only in their own joints but also in their attachment to the counter or other support to which they are usually attachedby screws.

By experience and experiments I have discovered that due to the fact that several pounds of paper is poised. on the central line of the standards, that the forward pull of withdrawing the paper from the retarded roll, inherently results in shifting the center of gravity forwardly of the central line of the standards, and that this sets up a stress which develops a vibratory force tending to urge the standards forward and backfixture, a cross piece 3| is rigidly attached in any suitable manner such as by bolts or screws, and this cross member 3| carries an open bearing support 6' similar to the one shown at 6 in Fig. 1, but displaced rearwardly of the center line of the standard 5. Similar construction is provided on each standard, and it will be apparent that in this manner the weight of the wrapper roll is thereby supported rearwardly of the center of the standards 5. In this manner the aforementioned poise is eliminated and it will be readily understood that when a pull is exerted on the leading strip to unwind it from the wrapper roll, that it is impossible to shift the center of gravity forwardly of the center of the standards 5, and consequently, the previously described vibratory stresses are eliminated, no matter whether the leading strip is unwound from the top of the roll or else from the bottom as here shown.

For economic practicability in attaching the unit P in this improved construction, each cross piece 3| extends forwardly of the standards 5, and the unit P is swingingly mounted as illustrated at H" in the manner previously described. Thus it will be seen that in commercial manufacture, it would be a very simple procedure to placethe bearing support 6' on the cross piece 3| instead of on the standard 5, and that the same fixture could be readily adapted to accommodate the unit P, with no more manufacturing effort than is required to make the simple cross piece 3|. Thus the old and the new can be electively produced with but slight change in manufacturing practice. The cross piece 3lis also shown with an additional hole Y, and it will be readily understood that this hole and the next one may receive the illustrated screws and thus the bracket 3| can be attached more forwardly, should such for any reason be desirable. When thus forwardly attached, the cross pieces 3| then constitute brackets serving the same purpose as the previously described brackets l5.

Figure 6 shows the unit P directed downwardly, but it will be readily apparent that it can be merely turned end for end and mounted upright in the position shown in Fig. 2, and of course it is optional whether the member I2 is employed or else the elements 2-34 which are shown in Fig. 3; in fact either of these expedients may be made of suflicient weight tosuffice in the absence of a tension spring, such constructions having already come into use in this art. It should also be mentioned that for the present purposes, it is not necessary that the blade 4 extend entirely across the wrapper roll; any expedient which will hold the paper in roll formation and also obviate excess rotation of the wrapper roll, is fully sufficient for the required purposes. However, it is important that any such member should contact the roll at a point immediately rearward of the line at which the leading strip L tangentially leaves the wrapper roll; for otherwise such member would inadvertently retract the leading strip from between the grippingjaws when they were opened in the intended operation of the device. To illustrate this requisite, Fig. 6 includes a phantom showing of a full size wrapper roll at F, half consumed at H, and the consumed roll at'E, with the tangent direction of the leading strip indicated at L in each instance; and it will be seen that the pivotal axis of the member i2 is appropriately situated so as to cause this member to contact the wrapper roll more near to the tangent points of the leading strip L than would otherwise occur were the similar elements 234 of Fig. 3 pivoted outside the diameter of the full roll, as there shown, which is the general practice. This favorable point of contact enhances the efficiency of the operation of the device, for the reason thatthe shorter the leading strip the less it tends to flex and buckle.

In some instances it is desirable to attach the device to the underside of a support such as a counter or shelf, in the manner as it would appear if the drawing Was held upside down. It will be seen that the showing in Fig. 6 is operatable in the inverted position, except that the bearing support 6 would need to be disposed with the open side oppositely. For this purpose the bearing support 6' can be inverted by merely transferring the cross pieces 3! to the opposite standards, as the bearing members 6 are necessarily left and right and can therefore be inverted when transposed as suggested. The man ner of inverting the showings in the other figures will be readily apparent.

When the invention is manufactured as a complete fixture, the embodiment shown in Fig. 4 is the preferred form, and a vertical section thereof is shown in Fig. 5 where the various diameters of the decreasing roll are shown in phantom at F, H and E as before described. My experiments and experiences have proven that when the wrapper roll is disposed rearwardly of the center of the standards that it is convenient and practical to eliminate the conventional feet In which are shown in Figures 1, 2, 3 and 6, and to also eliminate the conventional head rail I, and also eliminate the upper half of the standards, and at the same time produce a light weight device which is more sturdy and durable than the conventional fixture and also of more elegant appearance. For this purpose I prefer to employ a pair of standards 35 having a T-shaped configuration as shown in Fig. 5, and each of these standards is provided with an inwardly extending base 3%. Rearwardly of the center of each standard 38, an open bearing support 6a is provided for the spindle l; and for wardly of the center of eachstandard, the unit P is swingingly mounted at H in the previously described manner. Any suitable means may be employed for holding the paper in roll formation, as for instance, the previously described member l2 spring urged at I3, is illustrated in Fig. 5. The strip deflecting member 28 extends from standard to standard and may be either rigidly connected thereto, or else, more preferably, pivoted therein; as for instance in Fig. 4 the ends of the member 28 are internally threaded and bolts 28a pass through the respective standards and engage within the member 28' which is then free to turn on the shanks of these bolts as pivots. This construction assures a constant spacing of the brackets 30 and assures that they will be properly spaced when the user mounts the device on the necessary support in the well known manner by means of suitable screws passed through each of the inwardly extending base portions 3011. Near the end of each base 39a, a spring member 29 is disposed in cooperative relation with the strip deflecting member 28' to thereby hold the leading strip in contact with the member 28' and thus obviate inopportune movement of the paper when the unit P is swingingly moved towards the wrapper roll in the intended manner.

It will be seen that this construction requires fewer parts than the others and affords a more elegant appearance which is quite desirable in modern store equipment. Furthermore, the device is exceedingly sturdy and entirely free from the previously explained common fault of becoming rickety.

It will be apparent that the invention is susceptible of a variety of embodiments and readily adaptable to numerous-modes of manufacturing preference, and utilization.

In each of the drawings, it will be seen that the described unit P is supported on a pivotal axis which is between the axis of the wrapper roll and the forward crest thereof; and that from this pivotal axis, the unit P extends towards either the top or bottom of the wrapper roll and with the apron 25 disposed approximately on the vertical tangent to the front of the full size wrapper roll. In this manner, none of the parts project forwardly of the full roll of paper, and consequently, the construction obviates tearing of the clothing and snagging of the skin of workers who crowd past each other in narrow aisles where wrapping paper fixtures are commonly situated. It will also be seen that this compact arrangement of the parts is due to the fact that the arms l5 are spaced apart and positioned astraddle the ends of the wrapper roll. It will also be seen that since the arms it are spaced apart to straddle the wrapper roll, that the latter can with facility be introduced therebetween and passed rearwardly to the required position of the open bearing members, without any impediment or inconvenience in installing the wrapper roll in the fixture.

It is quite generally known in this art that nine inches is the standard diameter of all rolls of wrapping paper, and all wrapping paper manufacturers adhere to that well established standard; therefore, it is conveniently practical to make the present invention so as to conform to that well established standard, and avoid having any of the parts project forwardly of a full roll of standard diameter wrapping paper.

In the present disclosure, I claim as my inven tion:

1. In a wrapping paper fixture having standards carrying means for supporting a roll of wrapping paper and means to hold the paper in roll formation; a pair of arms spaced apart and positioned so as to set astraddle the ends of a roll of wrapping paper mounted in operative position in the fixture, said arms swingingly mounted on individual pivots supported in a fixed location relative to the fixture, a pair of cooperating gripping jaws carried by said arms, said gripping jaws and said arms and said pivots disposed entirely rearward of a vertical plane tangent to the front of a full roll of standard diameter wrapping paper mounted in the fixture, spring means for actuating said gripping jaws and for'urging said arms to swing forward, and stop means confining said arms and said gripping jaws to the space rearwardly of said vertical tangent plane, said gripping jaws and said arms being positioned so as to provide a free open space therebetween sufficient to aiford clearance for through passage of a full roll of wrapping paper.

2. In a wrapping paper fixture having standards carrying means for supporting a roll of wrapping paper and means to hold the paper in roll formation; a pair or arms spaced apart and positioned so as to set astraddle the ends of a roll of wrapping paper mounted in operative position in the fixture, said arms swingingly mounted on individual pivots supported in a fixed location relative to the fixture, a pair of cooperating gripping jaws carried by said arms, said gripping jaws and said arms and said pivots disposed entirely rearward of a vertical plane tangent to the front of a full roll of standard diameter wrapping paper mounted in the fixture, a strip supporting member disposed rearwardly of said gripping jaws and positioned so as to maintain the leading strip at a constant distance from the axis of the roll of wrapping paper, means for yieldably holding the leading strip of paper in constant contact with said strip supporting member, spring means for actuating said gripping jaws and for urging said arms to swing forward, and stop means confining said arms and said gripping jaws to the space rearwardly of said vertical tangent plane.

3. A wrapper feeding and cutting device comprising a pair of arms spaced apart and adapted to set astraddle the ends of a roll of wrapping paper, a pair of cooperating gripping jaws carried by said arms, a pair of brackets, said arms swingingly mounted upon the respective brackets by means of individual pivots, each of said brackets having a laterally extending wing for rigid attachment to the head rail of a conventional wrapping paper fixture, said wings having such angular relation to said brackets that when said wings are rigidly fixed to the head rail of a conventional wrapping paper fixture, the lower ends of said brackets will be disposed entirely rearward of a vertical plane tangent to the front of a full roll of standard diameter wrapping paper mounted in the fixture, spring means for actuating said gripping jaws and for urging said arms upon their pivots, and stop means confining said arms and said gripping jaws to the space rearwardly of said vertical tangent plane.

4. A wrapper feeding and cutting device comprising a pair of arms spaced apart to straddle a roll of paper, a pair of cooperating gripping aws carried by said arms, a pair of brackets, said arms pivotally mounted upon the respective brackets, said brackets adapted to be rigidly attached to a wrapping paper fixture, spring means for actuating said gripping jaws and for urging said arms upon their pivots to carry said gripping aws away from a roll of paper carried by the fixture, a U-shaped bearing member on the inner face of each of said brackets, a strip supporting member and a cooperating gravity bar loosely mounted in said U-shaped bearing members.

5. In a wrapping paper fixture having standards carrying means for supporting a roll of wrapping paper and means to hold the paper in roll formation; a pair of pivotally mounted arms spaced apart to straddle the roll of paper, a pair of co-operating gripping jaws carried by said arms, a strip supporting member disposed rearwardly of said gripping jaws, a gravity bar cooperating with said strip supporting member, a pair of U-shaped bearing members loosely supporting the ends of said strip supporting member and said cooperating gravity bar.

6.- A wrapping paper fixture comprising a pair of short standards, a strip deflecting member spacing said standards apart, each of said standards having an inwardly projecting base portion integral therewith, spring means carried by said base portions and in cooperative relation with said strip deflecting member, an open bearing support on each standard, each of said bearing supports correspondingly displaced rearwardly from the center of its standard and at the top thereof, a pair of arms pivoted upon the respective standards at points correspondingly displaced forwardly from the center of the respective standards and at the top thereof, a pair of cooperating gripping jaws carried by said arms, spring means for actuating said jaws and for urging said arms to swing forward, said arms and said gripping jaws operating in the space rearwardly of a perpendicular plane tangent to the front of a full size roll of paper mounted in said bearing supports, and a roll contacting member extending rearwardly of said standards and below said bearing supports.

'7. A wrapping paper fixture comprising a pair of standards spaced apart to accommodate a roll of wrapping paper, a pair of cross pieces rigidly attached to the respective standards, a pair of bearing supports for a wrapper roll, said bearing supports positioned on the rear ends of the respective cross pieces, a pair of arms swingingly mounted on individual pivots at the front ends of the respective cross pieces, a pair of cooperating gripping jaws carried by said arms, said cross pieces and said arms and said gripping jaws being disposed entirely rearward of a vertical plane tangent to the front of a full roll of standard diameter wrapping paper mounted in said bearing supports, spring means for actuating said jaws and for urging said arms to swing forward, stop means confining said arms. and said gripping jaws to the space rearwardly of said vertical tangent plane, and a roll contacting member projecting rearwardly of said standards.

8. A wrapper feeding and cutting device comprising a pair of arms spaced apart and adapted to set astraddle the ends of a roll of wrapping paper, a pair of cooperating gripping jaws carried by said arms, a pair of brackets, said arms swingingly mounted on the ends of the respective brackets by means of individual pivots, a pair of bearing supports for a wrapper, roll, said bearing supports positioned on the opposite ends of the respective brackets, said brackets adapted to be rigidly attached to the standards of a wrapping paper fixture, said brackets being of less length than the radius of a full roll of standard diameter wrapping paper, spring means for actuating said gripping jaws and for urging said arms upon their pivots in a direction opposite to said bearing supports, and stop means confining said arms and said gripping jaws to the space rear-- wardly of a vertical plane tangent to the front of a full roll of standard diameter wrapping paper mounted in said bearing supports.

9. A wrapper feeding and cutting device comprising a pair of arms spaced apart and adapted to set a straddle the ends of a roll of wrapping paper, a pair of cooperating gripping jaws carried by said arms, a pair of brackets, said arm swingingly mounted upon the respective brackets by means of individual pivots, each of said brackets having a laterally extending wing for rigid attachment to the head rail of a conventional wrapping paper fixture, a lip on each of said wings for aligning the same to such head rail, said wings the front of a full roll of standard diameter wrapping paper mounted in the fixture, spring means for actuating said gripping jaws and for urging said arms upon their pivots, and stop means confining said arms and said gripping 1o jaws to the space rearwardly of said vertical tangent plane.

FRANK H. LAWTON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2570724 *Nov 4, 1946Oct 9, 1951George H FritzingerTape dispenser
US2675077 *Jan 17, 1948Apr 13, 1954Better Packages IncDispenser for pressure sensitive tape
US3133714 *Mar 23, 1955May 19, 1964Inv S Man CorpDisposable staple element container cartridge
US6805271 *Sep 19, 2001Oct 19, 2004Holden Art Inc.Single hand, paper towel sheet dispenser
US7090106May 8, 2003Aug 15, 2006Holdenart, Inc.Frictional surface apparatus for one handed dispensing of paper sheet segments
Classifications
U.S. Classification225/15, 225/86
International ClassificationB65H35/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65H35/0006
European ClassificationB65H35/00B