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Publication numberUS2156629 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1939
Filing dateDec 11, 1937
Priority dateDec 11, 1937
Publication numberUS 2156629 A, US 2156629A, US-A-2156629, US2156629 A, US2156629A
InventorsReese Hutchison Miller
Original AssigneeReese Hutchison Miller
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Seat
US 2156629 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 2, 1939. M. R. HUTCHISON SEAT File d Dec. 11, 1937 I INVENTOR. M/ZZER RffSf #0705730 v 111's ATTORNEY..

.Patented May 2, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SEAT Miller Reese Hutchison, New York, N. Y. Application December 11, 1937, Serial No. 179,250

7 Claims. (01. 155-182) My present invention relates to seats and'more particularly, to seats of the type generally referred to as chairs, stools, pads and the like.

I have learned, after extensive research and investigation, that parts of the human body, if subjected-to undue, or abnormal abuse, will result in the creation of temporary, unnatural conditions, within the affected areas and, frequently, of permanent injury, as well. As is often the case, nature, in its endeavor to oifset the temmany conditions, causes. adjustments to be made in the affected tissues, or strives to'protect the afiected parts by the formation of tissues, which almost invariably result in permanent alterations or injury to the parts, unless the abuse is discontinued. For example, continued unnatural pressure on the prostate gland, in the male, may

- result in permanent injury to the gland and to the urethra, which it surrounds. The gland, being partly muscular and partly glandular, may become the source of great pain and discomfort if the muscular portions unduly are abused by excessive pressure, or the like. Such pressures may result in a thickening of the glandular portions and/or in the swelling of the entire structure,

, with the possible development of bladder and genital disorders. Another example is, the often experienced irritation of the sciatic nerve as a result of undue strains imposed thereon by the muscles of the gluteal and thigh regions of the body.

Again, it is well known that, when the circulation of the blood is decreased, the parts supplied by such decreased circulation are aifected, even to the extent of permanent deterioration, as in severe cases. Unnatural constriction of the blood vessels causes, if prolonged by pressure of the muscles, disturbances in the parts supplied by such vessels.

I attribute a large percentage of such disorders to. the unnatural posture of the human body, while sitting on the usual seats and, to the fact the standard designs of seats, in use today, do not properly support the tissues of the body, in engagement therewith and immediately associated therewith. Many tests and examinations, recently made by me, clearly indicate that such temporary or permanent conditions may be relieved, or eliminated, by theuse of a seat made in accordance with the principles of my present invention, which principles I will hereinafter describe in detail and illustrate in the accompanying drawing attached hereto and made a part hereof.

In the drawing, Figure 1 is a perspective view of a conventional type of chair having positioned,- thereon, a preferred form of my invention; Figure 2 is a rear plan view of a modified form;

Figure 3 a cross-sectional view, in perspective, of another modifiedform of my invention; and

v The pelvic region, of the-human'body, particularly in middle aged and older people, is a frequent source of ailment or complaint, largely because of the many important glands and organs located within that zone. Because of the fact the average man, today, assumes a sitting position, for a greater percentage of his wakeful hours than before, the muscles, glands, vessels and organs, of the pelvic region, naturally are subjected to greater and prolonged stresses and tensions than before. This is particularly true in cases where the surface, on which he sits, is not designed properly to support those portions of the anatomy in contact therewith. Where a hard, fiatsurface is used, there is a tendency, on the part of the muscles, to flatten out, causingv a pressure to be exerted upon the blood vessels, organs and nerves located within the area .of the crotch. In cases where a pad is used to afford a soft, resilient seat, the undesirable pressures and conditions, affecting the vessels and organs, often are accentuated, instead of being relieved as is generally believed to be the case.

I am aware that seat cushions and pads, of various types and designs, heretofore have been used in an attempt to counteract the conditions just described but, so far as I am aware, no attempt has been made to meet the conditions in the manner hereinafter described, For example, divided seats and padsliave been sold, wherein two or more sections of resilient material are arranged parallel to themedial line of the supporting surface but my investigations clearly show that such devices often are more harmful than obtains when a solid cushion is used, be-

main supporting members, designated as l0 and II., which may be composed of sponge rubber, or

other suitable'material, covered or not, as desired, with a suitable decorative material, such as velvet' or the like. The two members, I0 and II, have their edges cut, as illustrated, to conform,

' generally, to the shape assumed by those portions of the anatomy in contact therewith and to the. general shape and design of seats and chairs n use today. In order properly to support the muscles and organs in the pelvic region and pressure against the end of the spine or coccyx, I arrange the two main seat members, l0 and II, so that the edges, l3 and M, are nearer together at the rear portion of the seat than atfthe front a proper support for all portions of the body in contact with the seat, which results in a natural condition being maintained in said parts, during the sitting period.

When the body engages the two members, II and II, the muscles of the thighs and the muscles of the hips, are flexed and/or compressed, causing only a slight pressure to be exerted on the I tissues and glands associated therewith. If the pressure is not excessive, such as is caused by a natural posture or by a properly designed seat,

the muscles, organs, etc., are not unduly affected but, if the pressure is excessive, or unnatural, as in the case of sitting on the old types of seats, a temporary condition of fatigue is created which, if .not corrected, often results in permanent injury. For example, undue pressure of the afiected muscles, against the prostate gland, may cause excessive pressure of the gland upon the urethra which it surrounds, possibly resulting in bladder and prostate gland disorders, Continued pressure may cause the glandular portions of the gland to swell and thicken, causing a permanent injury In the preferred form of seat shown inFigure l the straps I and I6 control the spacing between the-seat members-and fixedly holdthe seat members spaced apart. The straps l5 and l are- :made of a materiaLsuch as heavilycompounded rubber, which is rigid enough-to prevent the two seat members from being displaced relative to each other. i l

. In Figure 2, I illustrate a construction where in the seat members, III and II, are held together by flexible straps, l5 and IS, the rear strap being shown as being adjustable, to permit the user to adjust the distance, at the rear of the seat, to fit his individual requirements. It is obvious, however, that both straps, l5 and I6,

' could be made adjustable if desired. Suitable straps, l1, l8 and I9, and rings 20, or other suitable fasteners, are provided, to secure the seat members to the supporting surface. 7 V

Figure 3 illustrates, in cross-section, a modified construction, wherein the space between the edges, I3 and II, is permanently fixed by means of a rubber, or other suitable material, member 2|, which is secured by cement, stitching, or in any suitable manner, to'the rubber pads, 2-2;

and to the turned-in edges of. the upholstering material, 23, as will be understood. The member, 2!, may be smooth or corrugated, on one or sides, as desired, to facilitate the attachment to the pads and to prevent undue move ment on the surface upon which the seatsare to be used. For example, the member ZI may be provided with the corrugations'il.

From the foregoing, it will-be seen thatI have evolved a new and novel seat for the support of the human body by which the body is supported in such a manner as to eliminate all undue pressures and tensions in the center thereof.

While Ihave illustrated and dwcribed certain embodiments of my invention, it is to be clearly understood that various modifications may be made in both the general form and design of the seat members, as well as in the nature of the materials used and the manner of securing the members in their proper spaced'relation, without departing 'from' the spirit and scope of my invention.

I claim:

1. As an article of manufacture, a seat for the support of the human body comprising two spaced cushion members and means for securing said members in spaced relation, the space between said members being less at the rear than at the front of the cushions, and being sufficient at the rear to enable said members to comfortably support the body while avoiding pressure on the central portion of the pelvic region.

2. As an article of manufacture, a seat for the support of the human body comprising two spaced cushion members and means for securing said-members in spacedrelation, the space between saidmembers being less at the rearthan at the front of the cushions, and being sufiieient at the rear to enable said members to comfortably support the body and great enough so that it will not be closed by the weight of the body on said members but will permit circulation of air between the two cushion members.

cushion members and means for adiustably securing said members in spaced relation, the space between said members being less at the rear than at the front of the cushionspand beingsuflicient at the rear to enable said members to comfortably support the body while avoiding pressure on the central portion of the pelvic region.

4. As an article of manufacture, a seat for the support of the human body comprising two spaced cushion members and means for securing said members to a supporting surface in spaced relation, the space between said members being less at the rear than at the front of the cushions, and being sufi'icient at the rear to enable said members to comfortably support the body while avoiding pressure on the central portion of the pelvic region.

5. As an article of manufacture, a seat for the support of the human body comprising two spaced cushion members and means for securing said members .in spaced relation, the space between said members being less at the rear than at the front of the cushions, and being sufficient at-the rear to enable said members to comfortably support the body while avoiding pressure on the central portion of the pelvic region, said securing means being corrugated with corrugations extending in a. direction transversely of said space between the two cushion member 6.-A seat as defined in claim 1 in which the bottom of the seat is provided with frictional means to prevent displacement of said seat relative to a supporting surface therefor.

7. As an article of manufacture, a .seat for.the support a of the human body comprising two spaced cushion members; and means for securing said members in spaced relation with the space between said members less at the rear than at the

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification297/452.25, 297/219.1, 5/653, 5/652
International ClassificationA47C7/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47C7/024, A47C7/021, A47C7/022
European ClassificationA47C7/02C, A47C7/02A, A47C7/02B