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Publication numberUS2156664 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1939
Filing dateNov 20, 1936
Priority dateNov 20, 1936
Publication numberUS 2156664 A, US 2156664A, US-A-2156664, US2156664 A, US2156664A
InventorsLitle Jr Thomas J
Original AssigneeLitle Jr Thomas J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Resilient cushion for beds, chairs, or the like
US 2156664 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

'T. J. LITLE, JR 2,156,664

CHAIRS, OR THE LIKE RESILIENT CUSHION FOR BEDS,

Filed Nov. 20, 1936 fa YM,

ATTORNEYS.

Patented May 2, 1939 UNITED STATES RESILIENT CUSHION FOR BEDS, CHAIRS,

OR THE LIKE Thomas J. Litle, Jr., Detroit, Mich.

4 Claims.

The invention relates generally to resilient cushions and it has particular relation to beds, chairs, cots and the like and resilient means for supporting the human body on such articles of 5 manufacture.

The idea of providing a resilient support or cushion for the human body is not new. A large amount of work has been done in this field and in recent years perhaps more attention has been l directed to obtaining softness and conformability than to any other factors that might be of interest. As a rule, however, the structures have increased in expense or cost according to the increase in efliciency and durability. In so" far as known, an inexpensive construction which-possesse's the desired durability and conformability to the body supported, has not been advanced and probably for this reason it still remains that most beds, cots, chairs and other similar articles of manufacture still are equipped with body supporting portions that do not have the resiliency desired.

One object of the present invention is to provide a simple and inexpensive resilient cushion for beds, cots, chairs and the like which will possess the desired resiliency and conformability.

Another object of the invention is to provide a resilient cushion of the above designated character which is extremely durable but which also 30 may be renewed, repaired or replaced,'if ever necessary, at a relatively small cost.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent from the following specification, from the drawing relating thereto and from the claims hereinafter set forth.

For a better understanding of the invention, reference may be had to the drawing, wherein:

' Figure 1 is a perspective-view of a chair provided with resilient cushions constructed according to one form of the invention.

Fig. 2 is a similar view of a bed or cot provided with a resilient cushion constructed according to the invention.

' Fig. 3 illustrates a frame provided with a re- 45 silient cushion constructed according to the invention which may be employed as an insert in various arrangements adapted to support the human body.

- Figs. 4 and 5 illustrate two different ways of 50 anchoring rubber bands comprising the cushion to the sides of a frame or thelike.

Referring to Fig. 1, a chair is indicated at Ill and includes a seat portion l l and a back ill. The resilient cushion comprises a multitude of endless rubber bands l3 extending between the side members of the seat and back of the chair and, as will be seen in Fig. 4, the loop ends of the bands are anchored to the side membersof the chair by providing a series of slots I4. It will be seen that each pair of slots forms a projection l5 and that Application November 20, 1936, Serial No. 111,799

the end of the band is anchored around this projection. Itwill be noted that the flat sides of the bands are directed substantially normal to the seat and back of the chair and that the strips of rubber are generally close together, from which 5 it follows that the load supported will be distributed over a large number of strips. In a sense, the large number of strips act jointly to provide a sort of seat-supporting surface and one sitting on the seat or leaning against the back of the chair has the sensation that there is a full and complete support. Normally, there is no sensation of sitting or leaning against a number of strips. It may be mentioned in this connection that when the strips or bands are disposed as shown with their edges up, they normally will turn or twist when a load is supported thereby so that the flat sides of the strips will have fiat con-' tact with the object supported. Varying degrees of tension may be secured by using bands that have to be stretched varying amounts to anchor them on the sides of the back or seat. It will be appreciated that the resiliency of the cushion may be varied by varying the dimensions of the strips or hands, varying the tension therein and by varying the spacing between the strips or bands. In the chair illustrated, the bands are closer together in localized areas where the great: er load will be taken, and it may be pointed out particularly that the rear portion of the seat is provided with bands that are closer together than at the front portion of the seat, so as to take care of the normally greater load on the rear portion of the seat when one sits down on the chair.

In the-arrangement shown by Fig. 2, which illustrates a cot, side members I! and 18 are provided at each side of the cot and these are pivoted respectively at [9 and 20 to a leg 2| at each side of the cot. Leg frames are provided at each end of the cot. These comprise legs 22 connected by cross member 23. These legs are pivoted to the side frame members as indicated at 24 and the cot may be folded up by pivoting the leg frame in the directions indicated by the arrows leading therefrom until such leg frames are folded between the side members of the cot and then folding the side members about the pivots l9 and 20. The collapsed cot structure, therefore, will comprise the two end portions of the cot folded into side-by-side relation.

The resilient cushion for the cot is essentially the same as that described previously in connection with the chair, excepting that a cord-or the like 26 is woven longitudinally between the rubher strips mainly for the purpose of preventing 55 undesirable separation of the strips centrally of the cot.

In Fig. 5, the ends of-the bands are anchored on a wire 21 of undulating character which has flat eye portions 28 secured to the frame member by screws 29. Opposing and upturned loop portions 30 provide projections for receiving the loop ends of the bands. It is apparent that a wire of this general type might be secured to a frame member in diiferentways and in case a metal frame is used, the wire might be welded to the frame or rivets might be used in place of the screws.

Fig; 3 illustrates a frame having a resilient cushion such as described and which is particularly adapted for use as an insert or as a collapsible berth or bunk. This frame is indicated as having tapering side edge surfaces 30 so that the frame may be seated in an opening of corresponding shape and thereby lodged securely in plac Several particular applications of the invention have been illustrated and in each endless rubber bands have been shown. 'Two different ways of anchoring endless bands in position for the purpose of the invention have also been illustrated. It is to be understood that, in general, the constructions illustrated indicate the application of the invention in a general form as it would be difficult to illustrate all the various forms of the invention or the various applications of it in use. Single strips of rubber, as distinguished from endless bands, may be used as will be apparent, and the ends of these strips could be fastened to'the sides of frame members in different ways that would be readily appreciated. Again a single long strip could be woven back and forth across the frame and the loops fastened to the frame. Various other ways of fastening the endless bands to the sides of frame members will readily occur to thosefamiliar with the art. Staples driven into the frame and across the ends of the strips or bands would be satis factory and it will be appreciated in this case that with the staples driven home, it would be practically impossible to pull the strip or band from beneath the staple. Where slots on the frame are used such as shown in Fig. 4, it will be realized that narrower slots could be used and the band or strip tensioned a much greater amount by pulling on portions at opposite sides of the slot and then slipping the then reduced section into the slot, after which the relief in tension would cause the section to swell and bind tightly in the slot.

Tensioning the strips or bands not only reduces the amount of flexing under load but also results in a smaller rubber requirement. Hence tensioning of the rubber further reduces the cost and weight of the cushion. The small cost of the cushion necessarily is of importance commercially and the light weight characterising the cushion is particularly important where it is used in aircraft, trains, etc. where weight reductions are of important factors.

Aside from the particularity of the bands themselves and the means of anchoring them, it will be apparent that all kinds of chairs, beds and cots can readily be equipped with a resilient cushion constructed according to the invention. Berths in trains, trailers and airplanes can readily be manufactured according to the invention, and in these instances, separate collapsible or pivotal frames may be used as will be readily understood.

It will be appreciated that the bands or strips alone without any covering or padding would be useful cushions and that inexpensive structures could be made which would be suitable for many uses. For example, the waterproof characteristic of the rubber would render the cushion useful in out of door furniture. Thin or padded coverings also might be used over the bands such as shown generally at IS in Fig. 1.

Although more than one form of the invention has been described and illustrated, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications may be made without departing from the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A resilient cushion for the human body comprising a frame, a series .of flat endless rubber bands extending across the frame in close and substantially parallel relation and adapted to support and conform to the body resting thereon, said bands being substantially wide relative to their. thickness and having their fiat sides arranged transversely to the plane of the frame so as to present one edge of the bands to the supporting surface and means for securing the looped ends of the bands to the sides of the frame under initial and substantial longitudinal tension.

2. A resilient cushion for the human body comprising a frame, a series of fiat endless rubber bands extending across the frame in close and substantially parallel relation and adapted to support and conform to the body resting thereon, the bands being substantially wide relative to their thickness and having their flat sides arranged transversely to the plane of the frame so as to present one edge of the bands to the supporting surface, said bands'also being spaced diiferently in various portions of the frame so as to provide localized areas of greater supporting strength and means for securing the looped. ends of said bands to the sides of the frame under initial and substantial longitudinal tension.

3. A resilient cushion for the human body comprising a frame, a series of fiat endless rubber bands extendin across the frame in close and substantially parallel relation and adapted to support and conform to the body resting thereon, said bands being substantially wide relative to their thickness and having their flat sides arranged transversely to the plane of the frame so as to present one edge of the bands to the supporting surface and means for securing the looped ends of the bands to the sides of the frame, with the bands under initial and substantial longitudinal tension prior to disposal of the body thereon.

4. A resilient cushion for the human body comprising a frame, a series of fiat endless bands extending across the frame in close and substantially parallel relation and adapted to support and conform to the body resting thereon, said bands being substantialy wide relative to their thickness and having their flat sides arranged transversely to the plane of the frame so as to present the edges of the bands as a supporting surface level with the frame and slot means in the upper edges of the frame sides to secure the bands under initial and substantial tension to the frame.

THOMAS J. LI'I'LE, JR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2726713 *Mar 17, 1951Dec 13, 1955James O TurnerChair with flexible bottom and back
US4456301 *Aug 17, 1981Jun 26, 1984Homecrest Industries IncorporatedFurniture construction
US4769864 *Nov 13, 1987Sep 13, 1988Park Ki DTherapeutic bed
US4881306 *May 22, 1989Nov 21, 1989Batesville Casket Company, Inc.Casket bed
US4958627 *Jun 30, 1988Sep 25, 1990Park Ki DTherapeutic bed
US5503455 *May 31, 1994Apr 2, 1996Formosa Saint Jose Corp.For supporting a person in a reclining position
US6663177Dec 12, 2001Dec 16, 2003Lear CorporationAdvanced elastomeric integral suspension seating system
US6842959Jan 25, 2001Jan 18, 2005Dahti, Inc.Load bearing fabric attachment and associated method
US6880886Jun 5, 2003Apr 19, 2005Steelcase Development CorporationCombined tension and back stop function for seating unit
US6899398Mar 6, 2003May 31, 2005Dahti, Inc.Carrier and attachment method for load-bearing fabric
US6966606Jan 15, 2003Nov 22, 2005Dahti, Inc.Carrier and attachment method for load bearing fabric
US7096549May 13, 2005Aug 29, 2006Dahti, Inc.Carrier and attachment method for load-bearing fabric
US7159293Oct 28, 2004Jan 9, 2007Dahti, Inc.Load bearing fabric attachment and associated method
US7165811Jun 5, 2003Jan 23, 2007Steelcase Development CorporationControl mechanism for seating unit
US7226130 *Jun 5, 2003Jun 5, 2007Steelcase Development CorporationSeating with comfort surface
US7334845May 14, 2004Feb 26, 2008Steelcase Development CorporationComfort surface for seating
US7360835Jun 4, 2007Apr 22, 2008Steelcase Inc.Seating with comfort surface
US7568763Dec 2, 2005Aug 4, 2009Steelcase Inc.Control for seating unit with back stop
US7647714Aug 27, 2004Jan 19, 2010Dahti, Inc.Load bearing fabric attachment and associated method
US8128175 *Jun 1, 2009Mar 6, 2012Herman Miller, Inc.Suspension seating
WO2004107920A1 *Jun 4, 2004Dec 16, 2004Steelcase Dev CorpComfort surface for seating
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/190, 297/446.1, 297/452.63
International ClassificationA47C23/22, A47C23/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47C23/22
European ClassificationA47C23/22
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 11, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: CREDIT LYONNAIS NEW YORK BRANCH, NEW YORK
Free format text: INVALID ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:GENERAL COMBUSTION CORPORATION, A SUBSIDIARY OF GENCOR INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:012822/0709
Effective date: 20011227
Owner name: CREDIT LYONNAIS NEW YORK BRANCH 1301 AVENUE OF THE
Free format text: INVALID ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:GENERAL COMBUSTION CORPORATION, A SUBSIDIARY OF GENCOR INDUSTRIES, INC./AR;REEL/FRAME:012822/0709