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Publication numberUS2157077 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1939
Filing dateOct 6, 1938
Priority dateOct 6, 1938
Publication numberUS 2157077 A, US 2157077A, US-A-2157077, US2157077 A, US2157077A
InventorsKroenlein Henry A
Original AssigneeFiltex Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vacuum sweeper nozzle and the like
US 2157077 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 2 1939-V H. A. KROENLEIN 2,157,077

' VACUUM swEEPER NozzLE AND THE LIKE Filed Oct. 6, 1938 3- Sheets-Sheet 1 lil.

|IIIIIH I! llilffi HENRY A. KRDENLEIN May Z, 1939. H. A. KRor-:NLEIN 2,157,977

n VACUUM SWEPER NOZZLE AND THE LIKE Filed oct. ej 1938 s sheets-sheet 5 HENRY A-KF-'UENLE1N .awed/MJ Patented May 2, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE- Henry 'A. Kroenlein, Jackson, Mich., assignor to The Flltex Corporation, Jackson, Mich., a corporation of Michigan Application October 6, 1938, Serial No. 238,642 4 Claims. (Cl. 15-155) The present invention relates to improvements in vacuum sweepers and the like, being particularly concerned with the air intake or nozzle structure.

In vacuum sweepers for home use of the socalled cylinder type in which the intake nozzle and source of suction are connected by a flexible conduit, ease of operation has been obtained at the expense of cleaning efficiency. The intake nozzle is usually attached toa rigid tubular handle portion through which the user manipulates the nozzle, generally, with a back and forth swinging movement of the arm, with the handle inclined with the surface over which the intake nozzle is traversed. To properly remove dirt from a rug or carpet, particularly in the case of one having upright pile, it is necessary to provide a vigorous upward suction through the body of the article being cleaned. Practically, this can only be accomplished by virtually sealing the nozzle against the intake of air along -the surface of the article being cleaned so that substantially the entire intake of air passes up through the back of the rug or carpet. When a cleaning suction of this type is employed, the outward movement of the nozzle over the surface to be cleaned requires an extensive amount of effort uponthe part of the user due to the resistance offered by the suctional engagement between the nozzle and the surface being cleaned and the fact that the manipulating force is directed along the plane of the inclination of the handle. 'On the other hand, the inward movement of the nozzle through the manipulation of the handle requires considerably less eort for the reason that there is a tendency to slightly raise the nozzle at the time the handle is drawn inwardly, andthus the operating force has no tendency to increase resistance to movement as in the case of the outward movement of the nozzle.

In prior nozzle construction for vacuum sweepers, in order to reduce the effort required for out- 'ward movement of the nozzle the effective suction has been reduced by either venting along the surface being cleaned or by having less suction than is required for eiclent cleaning. While providing an intake of air along the surface of the article being cleaned has certain beneficial effects, as disclosed in U. S. Patent No.'2,062,508, such as picki ng up threads, ravelings and the like from the surface, effective upward suction through the backing of the rug or carpet, thoroughly cleaning the body of the same, is sacrificed.

According to the present invention, a vacuum sweeper nozzle is provided in which, through automatically operating means, a strong and effective upward suction through the 'body of the article being cleaned is provided during one portion of the cleaning operation, and during another portion an equally effective suction is provided along the surface of the article being cleaned so as to remove surface drt, such as thread, lint, ravelings, etc. In the accompanying drawings are shown several practical arangements for carrying out this feature of the invention. My improved nozzle also includes anti-friction supporting structure for facilitating movement over the surface being cleaned, in addition to a blade which functions to loosen and ball up lint, thread, ravelings, etc., from the surface being cleaned so as to be more effectively acted upon by the intake of air.

Accordingly, one of the objects of the present invention is to provide air intake or nozzle structure for a vacuum sweeper in which the movement of the nozzle by the user in the usual manner controls resistance to movement of a nozzle over the surface being cleaned due to suction.

Another object resides in providing a vacuum sweeper nozzle in which a change in the direction of operation of the nozzle automatically operates to control the degree of effective suction and to regulate the resistance of the nozzle to movement over the surface being cleaned.

Another object of the invention resides in an improved vacuum sweeper in which internal and surface cleaning is automatically and alternately provided.

A further object is to provide a vacuum sweeper in which maximum suction and resistance to movement of the nozzle takes place during movement of the nozzle in one direction with automatic means for reducing the suction and resistance to nozzle movement at the time the nozzle is being moved in an opposite direction.

A still further object resides in novel automatically operating valve mechanism for vacuum sweepers which automatically controls the cleaning action and a degree of suction acting to resist movement.

Another object resides in providing anti-friction supporting means for vacuum sweeper nozzles.

Another object resides in providing anti-friction supporting means for a vacuum sweeper nozzle which also functions to automatically regulate the degree of suction and the resistance to movement of the nozzle over the surface being cleaned.

Still another object resides in an improved friction blade for vacuum sweeper nozzles for the gathering or balling up of certain types of surface dirt to enable more effective removal by air intake.

These and other objects and advantages residing in the arrangement, combination and construction of parts will more clearly appear from the detailed description and the appended claims when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein Fig. 1. is a partly broken plan view of my improved nozzle as seen from the underside,

Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken on line II-lI of Fig. 1, l

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken on line IIlI--IlI of Fig. 1,

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3 ,of a modified form of the invention in which relative movement between parts of the nozzle construction regulate the effective suction,

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 3 of another form of the invention in which the friction blade is supported to regulate the venting of the suction chamber,

Fig. 6 is another form of the invention in which the movement of the friction blade functions tol open and close a ventregulating the effective suction,

Fig. 7 is a still further form of the invention in which the effective suction is regulated through an inertia actuated valve, and

Fig. 8 is a still further modified form of the invention in which the friction blade operates a different type of valve from that shown in Fig. 6.

In Figs. l to 3, inclusive, I have illustrated the preferred form of my invention. As I wish to claim broadly, the automatic manipulation and regulation of a suitable vent, by-pass or other equivalent structure for regulating the character' of the cleaning action of the nozzle and the resistance of the nozzle to movement over the surface being cleaned, I have illustrated an unusually large number of modied forms of this feature of the invention. Numerous other arrangements for accomplishing this result will readily adjust themselves to those skilled in the art, and it is for this reason that I do not wish to be limited to the illustrated embodiments of my invention but wish to include as part of my invention all equivalent structure coming within the scope of the annexed claims.

Referring to the preferred form illustrated inv Figs. 1 to 3, there is shown a nozzle or intake structure I0, which is particularly designed to be bodily supported upon the surface being cleaned and manipulated through a rigid tubular handle insertable into the tapered portion I2 of the swiveled tubular connector I4. The nozzle I8 is preferably made up from three major. parts,

namely, a contact portion I8, a top portion I8,`

between which the rubber bumper 2liexte'nding entirely around the nozzle is confined, and the swiveled connector I4. The contact portion I8 has an integral senil-circular. crown portion 22 with a slot 24 therein registering with the connector I4. The crown outer surface of the portion 22 serves as a seat for the connector I4, upon which the same swivels. 'I'he connector I4 has portions 28, which are confined to ythe crown portion 22 by plate 28, which are urged downwardly by spring portions 80 acting against the overhanging portions 32 of the top I8. 'Ihe plates 28 are held against movement with the connector I4 through pins 34 projecting through openings 36. Suitable screws 38 hold the contact portion I6 and the top portion I8 in position.

The crown portion 22 extends longitudinally of the nozzle-to denne a main suction chamber 40 defined by longitudinally extending lip portions 42 and 44, which merge at opposite ends with the main body of the contact portion I8 to denne the extreme portions 48 of the suction chamber. Upon opposite sides of the suction slot 40 are rollers 48 and 50 supported for rotation in suitable bearings 52 and 54, respectively. As more clearly shown in Fig. 3, the rollers 48 `and 58 project slightly below the contact plate I8 so as to aiford a rolling supported to the nozzle to facilitate its movement over the surface being cleaned.

Where the feature of my invention about to be -described is not desired, the roller 58 may. be in- 58, the lip 44 has been slotted to provide an elongated opening 58, which opens the suction chamber 40 to the atmosphere through the opening 88. When the nozzle I0 is moved in the direction of the arrow shown in Fig. 3. which would result from the usual .outward movement by the operator, the drag upon the roller 5i) due to its engagement of the surface being cleaned will urgethe same to the full line position shown in Fig. 3. With the roller 50 in this position, the slot 58 is opened to the atmosphere, and the effective suction and the resulting resistance to movement of the nozzle caused thereby is reduced by the inrush of airthrough the slot 58. 'Ihis is for the reason that except for the assistance of the slot 58, the intake of air into the suction chamber 48 is primarily upwardly through the body of the article being cleaned. As the body of the article being cleaned offers some resistance to the iiow of air therethrough, the pressure in the chamber 48 will be below atmospheric andthe inrush of air through the slot 58 will reduce the effective suction.v When the nozzle I Il is moved to the right, as viewed in Fig. 3, the roller 50 will move into thedotted line position, closing the slot 58, and while it may continue to rotate in its slot closing position, the effective operating suction is` restored to the chamber 4I). When the nozzle is `being moved in the direction of the arrow shown in Fig.

3, the inrush of air through the opening slot 58 in addition to having the desirable effect of reducing the high suction and thus facilitating movement of the nozzle, also operates to pick up the surface dirt and is particularly eective in the removal of threads, lint, ravelings, etc. Y

From the foregoing description it should be understood that the end of each back and forth stroke of the nozzlev I0, as used in the conven my improved nozzle, I prefer-to locate Within the suction chamber 40 a friction blade 62, which is preferably of rubber having a metal backing strip 64 for securing the same in position so that the blade will rub over the surface of the article being cleaned and will tend to roll up or ball lint,

ravelings', string, and the like. so that they may be more readily' picked up by the suction.

YIn the modication shown in Fig. 4, the nozzle 66 has a contact portion 68 and a relatively slidabie portion upon which the connector 12 is swiveled in the manner of the connector I4. A pin 14 operating in a slot 16 defines a limit of relative movement between the parts. A vent or by-pass 18 is provided in the contact portion 68, which is adapted to be closed by the ange 80 with the parts 68 and 10 in one of their relative positions. The portion 10 is movable as a unit with the top portion 14, the latter being slidably assembled to the contact portion in any suitable manner. The operation of the form of the invention shown in Fig. 4 is as follows: 'I'he resistance to movement of the contact portion 68 due to the -suction will result in the portion 10 being moved to the position shown in Fig. 4 at the time the operator asserts outward movement upon the handle portion to which the nozzle is attached. In this position the port 18 is opened, reducing the suction in the chamber 82 to facilitate the movement of the nozzle. When the operator asserts an inward movement upon the handle to which the nozzle is attached, the resistance of the nozzle against movement due to suction results in the movement of the portion 10 to the right to close the ports 18 through the ange 80. Thus, during the entire period oi inward movement of the nozzle the port 18 is closed, and an effective cleaning suction will be built up in the chamber 82.

In Fig. 5 the by-pass slot or vent 84 corresponding to the slot 58 of Fig. 3 is closed during inward movement of the nozzle through a friction blade 86 carried upon an arm 88 vand pivotally supported at 90 in the nozzle. It will be understood that the frictional drag upon the blade 86 will swing the same away from the slot 84 to permit the intake of air, thus reducing the effective suction in the suction 'chamber 02. When the nozzle'is moved in the opposite direction, which will normally be an inward movement, the engagement between the blade 86 and the surface being cleaned will result in the blade 86 being swung into a position closing the slot or vent 84 to build up an effective cleaning suction during the period of inward movement. This form of theinvention is quite similar to that shown in Fig. 2, except that the blade 86 performs the dual function of automatically controlling the effective suction and resistance to movement of the nozzle, as well as balling up or gathering lint, ravelings, etc., for more effective removal.

The modiiied form of the invention shown in Fig. 6 is somewhat similar to that shown in Fig. 5 in that the friction blade 94 is supported from arms 96 for swinging movement about pins 98. When the blade 94 is swung counter-clockwise at the time of outward movement of the nozzle, ltV carries with ita valve |00, which opens the by-pass or vent |02 to reduce the effective suction in the chamber |04 in the same manner heretofore disclosed with reference to the other forms of the invention. When the blade 84 is moved clockwise, the valve l0 will move into a position closing the vent |02, which will take place during an inward movement of the nozzle at a time when maximum suction in the chamber |04 is permissible from the standpoint of ability to move the nozzle along the surface of the article being cleaned without exerting excessive eil'ort. A

Whereas the embodiments of the invention heretofore disclosed have been dependent upon resistance to movement ol relatively movable parts associated with the nozzle, a dierent principle is illustrated ,in the embodiment shown in Fig. 7 whereinA a balanced type valve |86 functions to open and close the vent or by-pass |08 leading into the suction chamber I0 through inertia acting upon a weighted body H2 supported for unitary swinging movement with the valve |06 about the axis III. In using the vacuum sweeper, the operator commonly moves the nozzle back and forth with a relatively rapid change in direction at the end `of each stroke. This sudden change in direction of movement is adequate to throw the weighted body ||2 rst to one side and then the other of the vertical plane through its axis of rotation I I4. As shown in Fig. 7, the valve |06 will be open at the time thenozzle is being ymoved inthe direction of the arrow shown. Upon reaching the end of the outward stroke, however, the valve |06 will be moved to a closed position through inertia acting upon the valve ||2 and will remain in this position closing the port |08 and provide a maximum suction in the suction chamber 0 until such time as the'end of the inward stroke is reached and a change in direction takes place, resulting in the weighted body moving into the full line position illustrated. Obviously, other types of inertia valves may be readily adapted to vacuum sweeper nozzles without departing from the spiri of my invention. t

In Fig. 8 the friction blade ||6 1s shown supported for rotation about an axis H8. A bypass or vent is provided in the nozzle, which is adapted to` be closed by a rotary valve |22,

which has unitary swinging movement about.

the axis ||8 with the blade ll6. A stop |24 acting in a slot |26 limits the movement of the valve |22, as well as the swinging movement of the blade il@ upon changes in direction of the movement of the nozzle. As in the other forms of the invention, when the nozzle is moved in the direction of the arrow, the valve |22 will be urged into the position shown in Fig. 8, and when the nozzle is moved in the opposite direction, the valve |22 will be automatically closed, giving maximum suction in the chamber |28.

With reference to the feature of my nozzle embodying antifriction means such as rollers for facilitating the movement of the nozzle over the surface being cleaned, attention is called to Fig. 7 wherein the rollers |30 and |32 are supported for movement about xed axes, as distinguished from arrangements shown in Figs. 1 to 3, in which one of the rollers is supported for relative movement transversely of the nozzle for the purpose of automatically regulating the effective suction in the suction chamber.

In each of the several forms of the invention herein illustrated for the purpose of disclosing the principle oi the present invention, it will be noted that I have provided automatically actu-v ating means for altering the cleaning characteristics of the nozzle, as 'well as facilitating its movement over the surface being cleaned so as to enable the use of the nozzle in the conventional manner with the least expenditure of effort, while at the same time securing a degree of emciency heretofore unobtainable. It will be appreciated that the build-up and reduction of the suction within the effective suction chamber of the nozzle is carried on without any speciic or unusual manipulation or operation upon the part of the user and is accomplished entirely through the manipulation of the vacuum sweeper in the conventional manner. I consider that I have provided a vacuum sweeper in which ease of operation has been secured without sacrificing an effective suc' tion for removing dirt from the body of the rug, carpet or the like being cleaned. At thesame time, during a portion of the cleaning operation, an intake of air along the surface of the article being cleaned is provided to gather up particles of,

dirt such as thread, lint, ravelings, etc., which might not otherwise be removed notwithstanding the high suction being exerted through the body of the rug or the like during the period of maximum suction taking place at the time of inward movement of the nozzle.

Having described my invention, what I desire to protect by Letters Patent and claimis:

1. A vacuum sweeper nome for cleaning carpets and other surfaces comprising a main body having a generally flat lower surface supporting the nozzle for sliding movement on the carpet, said lower surface within the borders thereof being recessed to define a suction chamber opening through the plane of said lower surface, an air by-pass defined in said body and opening into said chamber and extending to the atmosphere through which air may flow to materially reduce the degree of suction in said chamber whereby. the resistance to movement of the nozzle over the carpet is reduced, an elongated roller supported in said body for'rotary and bodily movement normal to its axis of rotation and toward the front of the nozzle as well as toward the rear of the nozzle in substantially the plane of said lower surface, the periphery of said roller projectingL into the plane of said lower. surface so as to engage with the 'carpet whereby rotary and bodily movement of said roller is induced through engagement therewith, said roller being supported adjacent said bypass and shaped to closely fit in said bypass to close the same in one position when the"4v nozzle is moved in one direction over the carpet, said roller in another position opening said bypass when the nozzle is moved in anopposite direction over the carpet.

2. A vacuum sweeper nozzle for cleaning carpets and the like comprising a body portion, a swiveled connection upon said body to receive an inclined handle for manually traversing the nozzle over the surface of the carpet or the like with a reciprocating motion accomplished through the outward, inward swinging movement of the users arm, said b ody having a relatively broad. base portion providing a wide contacting surface upon which the nozzle slides over the carpet, whereby said nozzle is flatly disposed upon the carpet at all times during cleaning operation irrespective of the inclination of the handle attached to said swiveled connection, a suction chamber defined in said body and opening through said base portion with the border of said contact surface furnishing an air seal for said chamber, an air by-pass defined by the wall structureA of said body and extending between said, chamber and the atmos phere, the cross-sectional area of said by-pass when non-restricted being suicient to materially reduce the degree of suction in the suction chamber, to facilitate the movement of the nozzle over the carpet, valve means responsive to changes in direction of movement of said nome supported in said body adjacent said by-pass, a portion of said means being disposed in the plane of said contact surface so as to engage with the -carpet during the normal reciprocating movement of the nozzle with the latter f iatly disposed upon the carpet, means supporting said valve means for movement into a position restricting said by-pass upon inward movement of the nome due to the drag of said portion upon the carpet and into a non-restricted position upon outward movement of the nozzle whereby during each reciprocation of the noule resistance to movement of the nozzle over the carpet is minimized during outward movement irrespective of handle mal niplllatin.

' 3. A vacuum sweeper nozzle comprising a body having a suction chamber defined therein, said body lhaving a base portion slidable upon the surface to be cleaned through which said chamber Opens, portions of said body dening a lip of said .chamber in the plane of said base portion, a bypass to the atmosphere defined in said body and through said lip above the plane of the surface of said base which slides upon the surface to be cleaned, said by-pass being of sufficient area when unrestricted to materially reduce the degree of suction within the suction chamber, an elongated cylindrical roller supported for rotation and bodily movement and toward the front of the nozzle as well as toward-the rear of the nozzle in said body in the plane of said by-pass, said roller being moved into a position restricting said by-pass .when the nozzle is moved in one direction due to frictional drag with-the surface being cleaned, and

' movement of the nozzle in an opposite direction moving said roller into a non-restricting position.

4. A vacuum sweeper nozzle comprising a body having a front side, a rear side, and a lower contact structure adapted to be atly disposed upon the surface to be cleaned during the cleaning operation, a suction chamber dened in said body, and opening downwardly through said contact structure, said body having a lip portion disposed in the plane of said lower contact structure and defining part of said suction chamber opening, said lip portion yof said suction chamber being spaced inwardly from said front andrear sides, a by-pass defined in said chamber and extending into the atmosphere, a valve member for closing said by-pass, means for supporting said valve member for movement toward the front of the nozzle as well as toward the rear of the nozzle, said valve means including a portion projecting into the plane of said lower contact surface and engageable with the surface over which the nozzle passes with said lower contact structure flatly disposed as during the normal cleaning operation, said valve having movement toward the front of said nozzle when said nozzle is moved rearwardly to close said by-pass and having movement rearwardly when said nozzle is moved forwardly to open said by-pass, said portion of said valve means engaging with the surface being cleaned being disposed between said lip portion and the border of said contact structure. f

HENRY A. KROENLEIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2517058 *Dec 3, 1947Aug 1, 1950Uber Jay JVacuum cleaner nozzle
US2556022 *May 14, 1947Jun 5, 1951Amen AtiyehVacuum cleaner nozzle with variable suction control
US2641015 *Apr 22, 1949Jun 9, 1953Filtex CorpNap deflector and valve control for vacuum cleaner nozzles
US2658228 *Apr 22, 1950Nov 10, 1953Lewyt CorpVacuum cleaner nozzle
US2688763 *Aug 24, 1948Sep 14, 1954Pfaffle George PSuction head for vacuum cleaners
US2716773 *Apr 2, 1949Sep 6, 1955Lewyt CorpVacuum cleaner nozzle having pivoted cleaning element
US2717409 *Sep 15, 1950Sep 13, 1955Herbert T DraudtVacuum cleaner nozzle
US2864119 *Sep 14, 1953Dec 16, 1958Crise Wilford PVacuum cleaner for drawing air through and intermittently over surface being cleaned
US2921331 *Dec 27, 1955Jan 19, 1960Filtex CorpAgitator for vacuum cleaner rug nozzles
US2978733 *Jan 14, 1958Apr 11, 1961Electrolux AbVacuum cleaner suction regulator
US3080599 *Feb 19, 1959Mar 12, 1963Electrolux AbSuction nozzle
US3633241 *Apr 10, 1969Jan 11, 1972Whirlpool CoVacuum cleaner nozzle
US4138762 *Jun 22, 1976Feb 13, 1979Theodor JostApparatus for sucking up dry or wet pollutants from the floor or ground
US5481781 *Jan 21, 1994Jan 9, 1996The Hoover CompanyRollered nozzle
US5539953 *May 17, 1995Jul 30, 1996Kurz; GerhardFloor nozzle for vacuum cleaners
US20070067946 *Feb 28, 2006Mar 29, 2007Samsung Gwangju Electronics Co., Ltd.Suction brush of vacuum cleaner
WO1986001240A1 *Aug 6, 1985Feb 27, 1986Schmidt Alfred Ing GmbhSuction device
WO2003039318A1 *Oct 29, 2002May 15, 2003Dyson LtdA cleaning head
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/369, 15/420, 15/325, 15/418, 15/375, 15/246, 15/419, 15/416
International ClassificationA47L9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/02
European ClassificationA47L9/02