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Publication numberUS2157818 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1939
Filing dateJul 21, 1937
Priority dateJul 21, 1937
Publication numberUS 2157818 A, US 2157818A, US-A-2157818, US2157818 A, US2157818A
InventorsDisch John E
Original AssigneeDaniel Green Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe
US 2157818 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. E. DISCH 2,157,818

SHOE

May 9, 1939.

Filed July 21, 1937 3 Sheets-Sheet l F/Gl H6. 6 30 BY JOHN ffl/scfl ATTORNEY.

J. E. DISCH May 9, 1939.

SHOE

, 1937 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 21 IN VENTOR. JoH/v D/scH ATTORNEY.

H c S D E l SHOE Filed July 21, 1937 3 SheerJs-Sheet 3 lNVEI VTOR. JOHN 0/30? ATTORNEY.

Patented May 9, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT, OFFICE SHOE Application July 21, 1937, Serial No. 154,701

4 Claims.

My invention relates generally to footwear. and more particularly to a novel type of women's shoes and slippers as well as improved and simplified methods of making same.

The objects of my invention are, among other things, to provide a novel and improved construe tion in turned soft sole shoes and slippers, with improved methods in making same, particularly to that type of shoe or slipper'in which the sole has a finished outer surface with the marginal edges of the sole bent over andturned in against a pad or filler secured on the inner unfinished surface of the sole so as to provide a finished edge around the contour of the sole.

Heretofore such type of shoe or slipper construction has been accomplished entirely by means of stitching which shows undesirably along the edge of the sole particularly where the shoe is subjected to extreme strains while being lasted, or when the materials used especially in the upper are of such a nature as'to require strong fastening means.

Further objects of my invention are to provide improved methods of making turned shoes or slippers having the outer margins of the outer sole extending over the stitching sufflciently not onlyto conceal same but also to protect this stitching from wear. I accomplish this desired object by allowing a part of the upper or lining of the upper and especially the outward extensions of same to project inwardly over the inner surface of the sole or padding with suflicient margin to allow the latter to be cemented or otherwise secured to the padding or to the sole. In case the sole is sufdciently thick then the padding ordinarily secured to the inner surface of the sole may be omitted.

When'the sole used in making my improved shoes is between 0.030" to 0.050" thick, I prefer to make a groove in the upper surface of the margin of such sole along the line at which such margin is preferably bent over and turned inwardly toward the stitching and padding, and then preferably apply a reinforcement of a suitable material, such as canvas, paper or leather, just inside of this grooved margin of the sole. If the sole is comparatively thick and heavy, then it must be skived or cut down along the margin where his turned, and this reinforcement may then be omitted, or in some forms the reinforcement and also the padding may be dispensed with.

In the resulting shoe or slipper, the upper or its lining extending inwardly on the padding or sole and secured thereto efiectively prevents the shoe or slipper from spreading at the sole when worn,

even though some of the stitches may become broken, which novel construction obviously adds geatly to the longer life and usefulness of the Likewise my improved structure improves the general appearance of the shoe by holding the stitches between the sole and upper and also by preventing such stitching from showing or coming into contact with the floor. Such shoe construction also holds these stitches in such position when the shoe is flexed in walking that they do not become strained, but bend with the material through which they pass. The sock linin or insole is cemented or otherwise secured to the padding or sole and also to the margin of the upper extending inwardly over the padding or sole thereby further securing the upper firmly to the sole and preventing such upper from spreading so as to distort the appearance of the shoe.

A further object of my invention is to provide anexceptionally simple but highly efiective and long-wearing shoe or slipper construction of the turned type which may be economically manufactured and which will retain its proper shape and contour in use.

Other objects and advantages will appear from the following description when taken with the annexed drawings in which Fig. 1 is a side elevation of my improved shoe or slipper when completed;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the outer sole before its outer marginal edges are turned inwardly:

Fig. 3 is a sectional view on the line 3-8 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a plan view of thereinforcement cemented to the sole shown in Fig. 2;

5 is a sectional view on the line 5--5 of Fig.

Fig. 6 is a plan view of the sole with the upper and its lining stitched to the margin of the sole;

Figs. 7 and 8 are sectional views taken on the lines and 88- respectively of Fig. 6;

Fig. 9 is a top plan view of the shoe as shown in Fig. 6 but having the padding secured to the outer sole with a piece of canvas secured thereto when a shank is to be used;-

Fig. 10 is a top plan view of my shoe when turned and lasted with certain portions broken' away to show the relation of the parts comprising the shoe; h

Fig. 11 is an enlarged view partly in section taken on the line l||l of Fig. 10;

Fig. 12 is a top plan view of another modified form of my improved shoe construction in which a thicker sole without a padding is used;

Fig. 131s asection ontheline |3-|3 of Fig. 12; Fig. 14 is an enlarged section showing the union of the upper with its lining to the thickened sole before turning;

Fig. 15 is a top plan view of another modified form of shoe embodying my improved shoe construction; and

Fig. 16 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the line |3-|3 of Fig. 15.

Similar numerals refer to similar parts throughout the several figures.

- Referring to the shoe construction shown in Figs. 1-11, Fig. 1 shows a side elevation of the completed shoe with the sole 2'2 and the upper 23 of fabric, leather or other suitable material with the counter 24 also secured to the sole 22. The sole 22 has the groove 25 cut inside the margin on the upper unfinished surface of the sole 22as shown in Figs. 2 and 3 to which is secured the reinforcement 23 by cement 21 or other suitable adhesive (Figs. 4 and 5). Then the upper 23 and the lining 23 (Figs. 7 and 8) are sewed together at the outer edges of the upper 23 by the stitching 23, so as to leave marginal extensions of the lining 23 suiiiciently large to be cemented on, or otherwise secured to, the padding 3| that lays on top of the sole 22 as shown in Fig. 9.

Fig. 6 shows the relation of the parts before the padding 3| is secured in place over the reinforcement 23 and sole 22. The oppositely disposed tabs 32 and 33 of the lining 23 are cut'in at the union of 'the upper 23 and counter 24 thereafter to be folded over the sole 22 in the middle part thereof as shown in the upper part of Fig. 9. The stitching 34 unites the sole 22 to the upper 23 along the margin of the sole as shown in Fig. 8. Cement is then applied to the grooved side of the sole (Fig. 8) and also to the margin of the upper 23 extending around the sole.

When the padding 3| is cemented to the sole 22 inside the grooved portion, a strip 35 made of leather, paper, canvas or other suitable material is cemented to the shank portion of the padding 3|, which strip 35 at its forward end is secured beneath the tabs 32 and 33 (Fig. 9) and forms in conjunction with the padding 3| a suitable pocket opening toward the heel for the insertion of the shank reinforcement member 36 (Fig. 10) Then the lower margin of the upper 23 and the margin of the sole 22 outside the groove 25 are turned inwardly over the padding 3| until the marginal extensions 33 and the tabs 32 and 33 rest on the padding 3|. and the extreme edge of the sole 22 meets and abuts against the outer margins of the padding 3| (Fig. 11). That part of the marginal extensions 30 of the lining 28 toward the counter 24 and heel is cemented under the strip 35 while the part adjacent the shank member 36 is placed on top of the strip 35 and from there forwardly such extensions 33 are cemented to the padding 3|, or to the sole 22, if the padding 3| and reinforcement 35 are, if desired, left out of the completed shoe.

The shoe is now turned, and the counter 24 and shank member 36 are inserted into the pockets made for them.- The shoe is thereafter lasted am'l the sock-lining or insole 31 is cemented to the padding 3| and the marginal extensions 30 ofthe upperasshowninFig. 11.

Referring to Figs. 12-14, Fig. 12 is a view of a modified form of my improved shoe construction that embodies a thick sole 48 without any padding 3|. This sole 43 is skived along its margin as shown in Fig. 14 and the groove 49 encircles the sole to provide the outer margin 50 that is folded lnwardlyover the skived margin of the sole 43 as shown in Fig. 14. Before this infoid is made the upper 23 having the lining 23 stitched thereto is fastened to the outer margin 56 by the stitching 34 as shown in Fig. 14. The

- extensions 33 are then turned inwardly and ceshown in Fig. 16. Thesole 52 has secured to it by cement the reinforcement 23 that carries the padding 3| as in the Figs. 1-11 construction.

Likewise the upper 23 and its lining 23 are secured together by stitching 23 as in the form shown in Figs. 1-11 with the marginal extensions 33' of the lining carried over the padding 3| and cemented thereto asshown in Fig. 15.

In this construction the upper 23 is cut away at the toe and heel, and I use inturned marginal strips 30A stitched to the sole margins 54 and cemented down on the padding 3| as shown in Fig. 16 that also illustrates this form of shoe when turned and lasted. The insole 31 is cemented over the padding3| and also over the marginal strips 33 and 33A.

In all the forms of my improved shoe constructions shown in the drawings, it will be noted that I have provided a novel and improved shoe construction with the marginal extensions of the lining of the upper inwardly extending over the padding on the sole or onto the sole itself when a padding is not used. vSuch shoe construction effectively prevents the shoe from undesirably spreading at the sole when worn in use, even though some of the stitches may have become broken, such factors adding materially in keeping the proper shape with correspondingly longer life in such shoes as used.

I claim as my invention:

1. A turnedshoe comprising an upper of pliable material having its bottom margin inturned to provide marginal extension strips'at its forepart, a sole having a padding fastened thereto inside the edges of the sole with the outer edges thereof bent over inwardly to abut with a surface-to-surface contact against the outer edges of the padding, stitches passing through the upper and bent-over portions of the sole with the marginal strips of the uppercemented to the padding inwardly of the bent-over portions of the sole, a rearwardly open pocket superposed over said padding, and a shank member carried in said pocket extending forwardly toward said extension strips.

2. A turned shoev comprising an upper of pliable material having a lining stitched thereto with the bottom margin of said lining inturned to provide marginal extension strips at its forepart, a sole having a padding fastened thereto inside the edges of the sole with the outer edges thereof bent over inwardly to abut with a surface-tosurface contact against the outer edges of the padding, stitches passing through the upper and bent-over portions of the sole with the marginal strips of the lining cemented to the padding inwardly of the bent-over portions of the sole, a rearwardly open pocket superposed over said padding, and a shank member carried in said pocket extending forwardly toward said extension strips.

3. A turned shoe comprising an upper of pliable material having its bottom margin inturned to provide marginal extension strips at its forepart, a sole having a padding fastened thereto inside the edges of the sole with the outer edges thereof bent over inwardly to abut with a surface-to-surface contact against the outer edges of the padding, stitches passing through the upper and bent-over portions of the sole with the marginal strips of the upper cemented to the padding inwardly of the bent-over portions of the sole, a rearwardly open pocket superposed over said padding, a shank member carried in said pocket extending forwardly toward said extension strips, and an insole cemented over the padding, said extension strips and stitching.

4. A turned shoe comprising an upper of pliable material having a lining stitched thereto with the bottom margin of said lining inturned to provide marginal extension strips at its forepart, a sole having a padding fastened thereto inside the edges of the sole with the outer edges thereof bent over inwardly to abut with a surface-to-surface contact against the outer edges of the padding, stitches passing through the upper and bent-over portions of the sole with the marginal strips of the lining cemented to the padding inwardly of the bent-over portions of the sole. a rearwardly open pocket superposed over said padding, a shank member carried in said pocket extending forwardly toward said extension strips; and an insole cemented over the padding, said extension strips and stitching.

JOHN E. DISCH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3302312 *Jul 19, 1962Feb 7, 1967Stetson Shoe Company IncMoccasin-type shoe
US5220735 *Jun 28, 1991Jun 22, 1993Dancing Bonzi CompanyPointe shoe
US5410820 *Mar 11, 1994May 2, 1995Goodman; Michael C.Hinged shoe sole assembly for fixed and variable heel height shoes
US5850703 *Jul 23, 1997Dec 22, 1998Boot Royalty Company, L.P.Cushioned insole
US5926975 *Feb 3, 1998Jul 27, 1999Goodman; Michael C.Hinged shoe sole assembly for working boots
WO1992020248A1 *May 15, 1992Nov 26, 1992Jo Anne Of California IncShoe with two-piece hinged sole and detachable heel
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/19.00A, 36/76.00R, 36/19.00R, 36/28
International ClassificationA43B9/08, A43B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B9/08
European ClassificationA43B9/08