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Publication numberUS2158571 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 16, 1939
Filing dateNov 7, 1936
Priority dateNov 7, 1936
Publication numberUS 2158571 A, US 2158571A, US-A-2158571, US2158571 A, US2158571A
InventorsRobert G Culp
Original AssigneeRobert G Culp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ice cap
US 2158571 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 16, 1939. R G. CULP 2,158,571

ICE CAP y Filed NOV. '7, 1936 by reason of the usual structures, the Vwearer Patented May 1.6, 1.939

UNITED lSTATES PATENT OFFICE ICE CAP Robert G. Culp, Conemaugh, Pa. Application November 7, 1936, Serial No. 109,778v

2 Claims.

The present invention relates to an improved ice bag and more particularly lto an ice bag construction in the form of a cap which is peculiarly adapted to be worn on the head of thepatient during periods of distress incident to common headaches, fevers, etc.

One of the prime objects of the invention is to provide a cap structure which will be extremely comfortable when worn, especially when the patient is in a reclining or semi-reclining position.

Heretofore in this art designs of ice bags and caps have given very little attention to the comfort of the wearer. As a consequence, with the has been forced, when assuming a reclining or semi-reclining position, to pull the bag forwardly on the head and to adjust the same from right to left so that the back of the head and upper part of the neck do not rest on the rough pieces of crushed ice contained in the bag.

The improved ice cap of the present invention does away entirely with this disadvantage and affords a structure which, when aixed to the head, needs no further adjustment or attention regardless of the position of the wearer until re-packing with ice becomes necessary.

Broadly speaking, the invention contemplates an ice cap structure of the usual size and outward configuration provided with a perforated wall which defines front and rear compartments. The front compartment is designed, when in use, to cover the greater part of the head and is adapted to contain the cooling medium, such as i. cracked ice. The rear compartment, comparatively smaller than the front compartment, covers the rear part of the head, and is adapted, perforated wall between the compartments to receive and retain the water caused by the melting ice in Iment. With such a construction it is obvious that the patient, when in a recliningor semireclining position, is afforded a cool cushion for the back of his head in the form of the rear compartment containing the water from melted ice. In other words, the patient is not forced to rest his head on rough pieces of cracked ice as he is with the conventional ice cap, unless, as pointed out, the cap is laboriously and in most cases, painfully adjusted, prior to assuming reclining position. This provision of the two separate compartments for the cracked ice and the i water affords, furthermore, a greater economy for the user, in that the water from the melting the front compart-- (Gl. 15o-2.3)

ice is constantly carried. to the rear compartment thus retarding the melting ofthe ice in the front compartment. This also allows the cap to last a longer period of time between changes of cracked ice.

Reference is now had to the accompanying drawing in which like reference numerals indicate like parts, and in which:

Figure 1 represents the cap as Worn by the patient;

Figure 2 is a top plan view of the cap, partly broken away to show in section, the perforated partition, and

Figure 3 is a side section view of the cap of Figure 2. 1

The cap consists of av main body portion generally designated by the numeral I which may be made of rubber, rubberized fabric, or any other exible, water-impervious material. This body portion, shaped as shown in the various figures of the drawing, is provided, on its inside, with a wall 2 having perforations 3, Perforated wall 2 may be made of the same material as that of the mainbody portion and may be molded integrally with the main body'portion. It is to be understood, however, that the wall may be l made of any suitable material and may be secured to the walls of the main body portion in any suitable fashion. The perforated wall is situated about two-thirds of the way back from that end of the cap intended to be the front portion, although it will be appreciated that the positioning of this wall is not critical so ylong as it is substantially to the rear of the cap. There is thus provided two compartments in the cap, 5 namely, front compartment 4 and rear compartment 5, the front compartment adapted to receive and retain cracked ice and the rear compartment receiving and retaining the water from the melted ice as it lpasses through the perforations 3. A conventional inlet port 6 and cooperating cap 'I may be provided for the introduction of cracked ice, in the front compartment.

end of the band by stitching Il, or by any other 55 suitable means. On the tab are one or more hooks, or other male fastening means l2, which cooperate with one or more eyes, or other fe male fastening means I3, affixed to the other end of the band.

It is obvious that various minor changes in design and materials may be made without de- 1parting from the scope and spirit of the invenion.

What isclaimed is:

1. A device for the alleviation of headaches, fevers, etc, comprising a cap-like member adapted for snug disposition upon the human head, said cap-like member having a front cell which in use normally lies over the front part of the patients head and which is adapted to contain cracked ice, a rear drainage cell which in normal use lies over the rear part of the patients head and a perforated wall common to said cells adapted to permit Water from the melting ice in said front cell to ow automatically into said. rear drainage cell while retaining the ice in said front cell. i

2. A device for the alleviation of headaches, fevers, etc. comprising a cap-like member adapted for snug disposition upon the human head, said cap-like member having a front cell which in use normally lies over the front part of the patients head and Which is adapted to contain cracked ice, a rear drainage cell which in normal use lies over the rear part of the patients head and a perforated Wall common to said cells adaptedy to permit water from the melting ice in said front cell to flow automatically into said rear drainage cell While retaining the ice in said front cell, and a flexible head band to hold the cap on the patients head.

ROBERT G. CULP.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2783806 *Aug 30, 1954Mar 5, 1957Andreadis Harriet CHot oil treatment cap
US3090045 *Sep 26, 1960May 21, 1963Hurst Howard LeeThermal head appliance
US4356709 *Mar 2, 1981Nov 2, 1982Alexander Dixie FIce cap
US5950234 *Mar 31, 1997Sep 14, 1999Leong; RandyCooling pack head covering
US6560784Feb 5, 2002May 13, 2003Jordan Heather Meredith HillMulti-layered moisture resistant hair wrap
US7930772Apr 26, 2011Pedro Javier FontanezBlind head cooling helmet
US8236038Aug 7, 2012University Of Pittsburgh-Of The Commonwealth System Of Higher EducationMethod and apparatus of noninvasive, regional brain thermal stimuli for the treatment of neurological disorders
US8425583Feb 2, 2011Apr 23, 2013University of Pittsburgh—of the Commonwealth System of Higher EducationMethods, devices and systems for treating insomnia by inducing frontal cerebral hypothermia
US9089400Apr 22, 2013Jul 28, 2015University of Pittsburgh—of the Commonwealth System of Higher EducationMethods, devices and systems for treating insomnia by inducing frontal cerebral hypothermia
US9211212Jul 25, 2014Dec 15, 2015CerÍve, Inc.Apparatus and method for modulating sleep
US20060130507 *Dec 20, 2004Jun 22, 2006Grover Michael EArticle of manufacture for keeping a persons body cool
US20070250138 *Apr 20, 2007Oct 25, 2007Nofzinger Eric AMethod and apparatus of noninvasive, regional brain thermal stimuli for the treatment of neurological disorders
US20090054958 *Oct 20, 2008Feb 26, 2009Nofzinger Eric AMethod and apparatus of noninvasive, regional brain thermal stimuli for the treatment of neurological disorders
US20110125238 *May 26, 2011Nofzinger Eric AMethods, devices and systems for treating insomnia by inducing frontal cerebral hypothermia
WO2015022565A1 *Aug 14, 2013Feb 19, 2015Littau Design, UabSauna cooling hat
Classifications
U.S. Classification607/110, 2/7
International ClassificationA61F7/10, A42C5/00, A61F7/00, A42C5/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2007/0001, A42B1/008, A61F7/103
European ClassificationA61F7/10B, A42B1/00F