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Publication numberUS2158929 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 16, 1939
Filing dateMay 14, 1937
Priority dateMay 14, 1937
Publication numberUS 2158929 A, US 2158929A, US-A-2158929, US2158929 A, US2158929A
InventorsDunajeff Leonid A
Original AssigneeCommercial Ingredients Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Resilient sheet
US 2158929 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 16, 1939. L A. DUNAJEFF RESILIENT SHEET Filad lay 14, 1937 lE'O/V/D A. DUNA J'EFF INVENTOR F fla'am/ ATTORNEY Patented May 16, 1939 PATENT orrlcs RESILIENT SHEET Leonid A. Dunajeif, New York, N. Y., assignor to Commercial Ingredients Corporation, New York,

N. Y., as trustee Application May 14, 1937, Serial No. 142,630 '1 Claims. (01. 29-180) My invention relates to resilient sheets and has particular reference to perforated and corrugated sheets made of a resilient material.

The object of my invention is to provide a sheet 6 having high resiliency and substantial elongation in all directions combined with suflicient strength to withstand transverse loads, so that it can be used as a material for making seats and backs of chairs and similar furniture or as a foundation for 10 upholstering in place of ordinary springs. For this purpose I use metal sheets of high resiliency, such as carbon or alloy steel, bronze etc., perforated so as to produce a mesh-like structure, the perforations resulting in the formation of a plurality of interconnecting bridges, and these bridges are then corrugated so as to form them into stretchable springs. The sheet, when perforated and formed, can-be heat treated to increase its resiliency if made of carbon steel. With .9 other metals and alloys the resiliency can be imparted by the cold working of the metal. My sheet, in order to be expansive or stretchable in all directions, must have corrugated bridges separated by perforations between elements which are connected by the bridges, and the perforations must extend across the bridges. It is evident that any longitudinal corrugations. will not make the bridges expansive lengthwise. The corrugations, however, need not extend at right angles to the axis of the bridge. They may extend even at an angle, provided that they cross the bridge, 1. e., begin and end in the perforations, so as to render the bridge expansive lengthwise. In the following description therefore the term I transverse" or substantially transverse" horrugations will include all such corrugations as cross the bridges and end in the perforations or are interrupted by perforations.

Another object of my invention is to provide a 40 resilient sheet which can be prepared of large sheets of metal as described above, these sheets being then cut and trimmed to suit various practical applications.

Another object of my invention is to provide a I resilient sheet formed with a plurality of corrugated spring-like portions extending in various directions, the corrugations projecting to one side of the sheet, leaving the other side smooth so as to provide a smooth front side for the chair seats 50 and backs, or for other similar applications where the surface must be smooth. The smooth surface may be then covered by someflexible inelastic protective material.

Another object of my invention is to provide a method of making resilient sheets, consisting in perforating a sheet so as to form a plurality of interconnected bridges, and corrugating the bridges into spring-like resilient members.

My invention is more fully explained in the accompanying specification and drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is a front view of my resilient sheet.

Fig. 2 is a sectional view of the same.

Fig. 3 is a front view of a modified resilient sheet.

Fig. 4 is a sectional view of the same.

Fig. 5 is a front view of another modification.

Fig. 6 is a sectional view of the same.

Fig. 7 is a front view of a resilient sheet made to form a chair seat.

Fig. 8 is a sectional view of the same.

Fig. 9 is a diagrammatic view of my resilient sheet deflected under a load.

My resilient sheet consists of a sheet of metal I,

.preferably carbon steel which can be heat treated to a spring temper, or an alloy which can be made resilient by cold rolling and stamping or forming operations. It is provided with a plurality of perforations 2, the material between the perforations forming bridges 3 extending at right angles to each other. Portions 4 of the sheet of metal interconnecting the bridges may be provided with holes 5 which may be used for attaching the sheet to supporting frames or for attaching covering and upholstering materials to the sheet. The bridges are folded or corrugated as shown so that every so bridge forms a spring which can expand under load, returning to the original shape when the load is removed.

The corrugations act as small individual springs imparting a certain elasticity to the whole sheet in all directions. The result is that the sheet defiects under a load as if made of a very elastic substance, as shown in Fig. 9 where an elastic sheet 1 is fastened to a frame 8 and is deflected by a load 9 at different points. The curve of de- 0 flection, of course, will vary considerably for an irregular distribution of load as every individual spring will become deflected in accordance with its load. My sheet therefore can replace mattress and bed foundations made of individual helical springs at a considerably reduced cost and with increased reliability. The use of a single integral sheet eliminates a large number of joints necessary with a helical spring assembly thereby also eliminating points of friction and wear, these points of friction being often a cause of annoying squeaks. The sheets can be made in standard sizes and trimmed to suit particular applications, the holes 5 being then used for attaching the sheet to its supporting frame and also for attaching fabric and covers. The front side of the sheet is made smooth by keeping the corrugations 6 below its front surface as shown in Fig. 1.

A modified structure is shown in Figs. 3 and 4' with hexagonal perforations III which may be elongated in one direction so as to obtain a greater resiliency in one direction.

Another modification is shown in Figs. 5 and 6. Here holes II are provided at the points of inter-. section of corrugations l2, the sheet being of a somewhat greater rigidity and strength than the sheet shown in Figs. 3 and4. It has a smoother and more uniform surface suitable for certain applications where a flat metal surface may be required without any covering by a fabric, as in metal chairs, for instance.

Another modification is shown in Figs. 7 and 8 depicting a sheet l3 made as a seat for a chair and provided with holes ll at its edges for fastening these edges to the frame of the chair. The perforations l5 are made of different sizes in order to adjust the resiliency .of the corrugations 6 and, partly, for ornamental purposes, if the sheet is left uncovered by any upholstering.

My resilient sheets are especially suitable for ofllce and outdoor furniture where it is desired to have all-metal furniture with sufficiently soft or resilient seats and backs; also for hospitals etc. where the furniture must be sanitary and can be washed and sterilized.

I claim as my invention:

1. An expansive sheet having a plurality of portions connected by bridges with perforations between the bridges, every portion being connected by the bridges with at least three other portions, the bridges having corrugations directionally extending in a. substantially transverse direction, the corrugations being interrupted by the perforations.

2. A resiliently expansive sheet formed integrally with portions connected by bridges with perforations between the bridges, the bridges having substantially transverse corrugations for rendering them longitudinally expansive, the cormgations being interrupted by said perforationsg every portion being connected by bridges with at 5 least three other portions.

3. A resiliently expansive sheet formed inte-i grally with portions connected by bridges with perforations between the bridges, the bridges having substantially transverse corrugations for 1D rendering them longitudinally expansive, the corrugations being interrupted by said perforations, the portions being provided with supplementary perforations.

4. A resiliently expansive sheet made of perfo- 15 rated sheet material, the perforations being distributed so as to leave a pattern of portions interconnected upon their outsides by bridges, the bridges being folded in substantially transverse directions, the ridges of the folds being interrupted by the perforations.

5. A sheet made laterally expansive by folding it into a plurality of groups of corrugations forming rows, the corrugations of one group of rows extending in generally parallel directions but in- 25 tersecting the corrugations of the other groups of rows, the corrugations at the points of intersection being interrupted by perforations.

6. "A sheet made resiliently expansive indifferent directions by folding it into a plurality of 30 groups of corrugations, the corrugations of one group directionally intersecting the corrugations of other groups, the corrugations at the points of intersection being interrupted by perforations.

'7. A resiliently expansive perforated sheet hav-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2871556 *Feb 28, 1955Feb 3, 1959Bugbee & Niles CompanyMethod of making mesh fabric
US3994693 *Dec 5, 1973Nov 30, 1976Lockheed Missiles & Space Company, Inc.Used to contain cryogenic liquids
US5366782 *Aug 25, 1992Nov 22, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyPolymeric web having deformed sections which provide a substantially increased elasticity to the web
US5554145 *Feb 28, 1994Sep 10, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article with multiple zone structural elastic-like film web extensible waist feature
US5650214 *May 31, 1996Jul 22, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb materials exhibiting elastic-like behavior and soft, cloth-like texture
US5691035 *Jun 25, 1996Nov 25, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb materials exhibiting elastic-like behavior
US5723087 *Aug 7, 1996Mar 3, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb materials exhibiting elastic-like behavior
US5749866 *Sep 27, 1996May 12, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article with multiple zone structural elastic-like film web extensible waist feature
US5876391 *Oct 10, 1996Mar 2, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article with structural elastic-like film web waist belt
US5891544 *Sep 30, 1997Apr 6, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb materials exhibiting elastic-like behavior
US5904673 *Dec 3, 1996May 18, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article with structural elastic-like film web waist belt
US5916663 *Sep 30, 1997Jun 29, 1999Chappell; Charles W.Web materials exhibiting elastic-like behavior
US5947948 *Jun 19, 1996Sep 7, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article with multiple zone structural elastic-like film web extensible leg flap panels
US5993432 *Sep 15, 1997Nov 30, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb materials having elastic-like and expansive zones
US6027483 *Apr 24, 1997Feb 22, 2000Chappell; Charles W.Web materials exhibiting elastic-like behavior
US6316121 *Jun 12, 2000Nov 13, 2001Emitec Gesellschaft Fuer Emissionstechnologie MbhMetal foil with through openings and honeycomb body
US6325787Jul 14, 1999Dec 4, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article with multiple zone structural elastic-like film web extensible waist feature
US6706028Oct 24, 2001Mar 16, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article with multiple zone structural elastic-like film web extensible waist feature
US7449248 *Nov 10, 2003Nov 11, 2008Stork Prints B.V.Screen material manufacturing method and applications thereof
US7527615Jan 30, 2004May 5, 2009The Procter & Gamble CompanyStructural elastic-like nonwoven web
US8678505 *Dec 21, 2010Mar 25, 2014Tachi-S Co., Ltd.Seat cushion of vehicle seat
US20120153702 *Dec 21, 2010Jun 21, 2012Tachi-S Co., Ltd.Seat cushion of vehicle seat
USB421975 *Dec 5, 1973Mar 2, 1976 Title not available
WO2008000413A1 *Jun 25, 2007Jan 3, 2008Mwh MetallwerkPunched, perforated sheet
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/596, 428/604, D25/155, 297/452.55, D05/1
International ClassificationA47C7/02, A47C7/16
Cooperative ClassificationA47C7/16
European ClassificationA47C7/16