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Publication numberUS2159615 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1939
Filing dateOct 13, 1937
Priority dateOct 13, 1937
Publication numberUS 2159615 A, US 2159615A, US-A-2159615, US2159615 A, US2159615A
InventorsKaak Kurt
Original AssigneeNarrow Fabric Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Warp knit fabric
US 2159615 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2 Sheets-Sheet 1 May 23, 1939. K. KAAK wAP KNIT FABRIC Filed oct. 13, 1957 F1. Ef- E- Z/lNI/ENTOR Y HIT ala b BY ATTORNEY.

May 23, 1939. K KAAK Y 2,159,615

wARP KNIT FABRIC Filed oct. 1s, 1937 y 2 sheets-sheet 2 :ELE-Q5- .52, l Y i' ZZ Y f 1J- M16 f z/ E l 19 11 1li l ZZ .i I ZZ ,Z0

Fica--Q Sjef Z4' V l i NVENTORI W9 BY I L E Z 4 i 7 ATTOR EY.

, vlyNl'lll'.)STA'lfE-'s PATENT a waar KNIT Fanano -Kurt Kaat, Welt Beading, Pa., assignor to The Narrow Fabric Company, West .I a corporationl of Pennsylvania Beading, Pa.,

application october 13,1937, sensi No. v16u13 6 Claims.

My invention relates to improvements in warp 'knitfabrica and particularly to methods of, and means for, preventing-.disruption of warp knit {abricsof-.the .elastic girdle, bandage and other yves- Amongst the difficulties experienced with fabrics of the above-indicated character,` as'heretofore constructedhas been the, problem of preventing slippage of elasticastrands, 'such as rubber strands, relative to fibrous yarn strands such as thoseof cotton, rayon or sill; this problem having been particularlvdimcult in warp knit fabrics of L,the sci-called porous or open work type for use "ini garments of brassiere, girdle, stocking band or other bandage character.

` A highly successful solution of the above-mentioned-problem, heretofore suggested, is the provisionof .individual warp stitchyarn chains in the nature of coverings, for the respective elastic warp strands, irrespective of whether the latter have other` coverings, as oi' wound cottonthreads, previouslyformed thereon `or not.

The warp stitch chains may be formed on the elastic warp strands to definitely prevent` slippage, andthe weft yarns may be so interlinked with the chainswithout depending on any direct looping about the elastic warp strands, as to provide a highly desirable and successful fabric, so far as the formerV diffiiculty is concerned.

However, the above-noted solution oi' the aforementioned problem introduced a new' problem whereby `the above-mentioned warp stitch chains tend to ravel` when ruptured, whereby not only ,fto canse damage along the warps,

' Vrelease weft yarns.' e

but also to Rupture of a weft yarn without rupture of a warp stitch chain 4in a warp .knit fabric having warp stitch chains as heretofore" employed, by

reason of the interlinked-relation of the yarn to the warp stitch chains, although tending tumore or less indefinitely andincidentally, limit disruption of the yfabric by extensions ofthe weft yarn yrupture, `nevertheless is vnot ldefinitely guarded against ,the extension of such disruption, as in the fabric of myl invention, aswill appear, and. of course, rupturepf bothv a warpfstitch chain y and a weft yarn at the same location, or within y certain linkageproidmityto each other in a prior fabric, will b extended more, or vcause greater disruption, thana rupture of either one alone.-,

-.'. Rupture, of either the weft, yarns or 1 warp "stitch, Ichains 4may be caused bypins or other sharp objects,L or .bylocaiized strain or fdrnnag'e oi' various kinds, and the'chains of the fabrics asy heretofore produced subjected to greater likeli- `,by, the other yarn.

(ci. sei-.192)

hood of breakage and extensive disruption by reason of the outstandingpositions thereof on heavy ric.

From such causes, a garment, as formerly made from a fabric of this type, may become notonly unsightly from many small disruptions, but unwearable from one or more larger ones resulting from rupture, which readily occur, as well as 'to reach the end of its usefulness long before yit might otherwise be considered as worn out. y A solution of the latter problem is most high# ly to be desired, to which end the invention hereof is directed, with' one ofyits objects to eil'ect such solution in as simple a manner as possible, without adding unduly to its cost or difficulty of manufacture, and proved product., y y 1 Another object is. to provide a. method of producing the fabric hereof which may be practiced on a standard warp knitting machine, without any chafnge otherthan variation of the pattern mechanism set up, similar to adjustments involved in any usual modification of pattern.

Another object\is to definitely prevent disrup- .tion of warp knit fabrics, independently of any tendency of 4any part` of ,the fabric to limit disruption incidentally. L

Another object is to provide novel arrangements of yarns in fabrics of the above-'indicated character for the indicatedand other uses.

A further object is to obtain a fabric of denitely limited disruptive character, or of a character directly controlling parts thereof ordinarily tending to extend damage, such as distortion or destruction of theloopshapes, resulting from rupture of a yarn or yarns; this object being obi tained inthe example given, by the use of tiein yarn, which may assume various novel forms,

and effect various novel results, as by being laid and formed parallel t0, or coincident with, other yarn, as bybeing smaller or stronger than' the other yarn, or of different texture, and `which may bite into 'the other yarn, or be caused to either add a design feature' to, or `bel obscured With these and other objects in view, which `will become apparent from thefollowing detailed description lof the illustrative 'embodiment of the invention shown in the accompanying drawings, my invention resides in the novelV method steps, featuresv of `coristruction, and L arrangement of claims. v

`to render it a distinctly imparts of the fabric in', cooperative relationship as hereinafter more particularly pointed out in the knit fabric constructed in accordance with the,

invention, a central portion, having a pattern like the remainder thereof, as shown, being broke wir: f

l Fig. 2 is a detail cross sectional viewon a very greatly enla scale, of a portion of the central fabric area illustrated in Fig. 1, with the face, as illustrated in Fig. l, at the top of Fig. 2;

Fig. 31s a face view, drawn to the scale of Fig. 2, of a portion of the central area of the fabric above-mentioned, and as viewed in Fig. 1, showing ruptures of 'warp stitch chain and weft yarns, and how disruption is definitely limited; and

. Fig. 4 is a view, drawn to the scale of Figs. 2 and 3, of a small fractional portion of the fabric thereof, showing the side or face reverse to that of Fig. 3, corresponding to the underside of Fig. 2.

- Referring/to the drawings, one example of a fabric constructed in accordancewith the inven-..

' tion is substantially as shown in Fig. 1, and is of the warp knit elastic type commonly used in garments.such as girdles. brassieres, and bandages for various parts of the body, and for other use.

In this instance, the fabric comprises, in general, a main or central bodyarea A, of repetitive pattern throughout, and disposed intermediate duplicate border areas B. The area A comprises,

in general, warpwise portions 5, in relief, or form- 'ing ridges equally spaced weftwise .from one a'nother, on one face of the fabric, and weft yarn 'areas 6 between the ridges. The areaA has one 'of the warpwise portions 5 at each weftwise -boundary next to the corresponding border area Each border B has wapwise portions 1, like the portions 5 of the area A, except as to their relation to each other the portions 1' being dis- ,psed in pairs which are each spaced from the n'ext adjacent pair or pairs, byI weft yarn areas Q,- the same weftwise distance as every other pair is so spaced from the next pair or pairs. This `arrangement places a pair of the portions 1 next t a portion 5 whereby to provide triple warp "strand areas C, in addition tothe single and double-strand 4areas set forth. Each outermost pair of strands 1 appears slightly different from the other pairs by reason of the arrangement of weft threads which form more of a single cover for the two strands of the pair. Also, the borders B are not further specifically set forth herein,

except that they embody the invention `in a form similar to the form shown and described relative' tothe area A, as will be understood; the weft yarn areas 8 being of more or less closed, or less porous,l character than the areas :6.

f Specifically, each of the warpwlse portions 5 and 1` comprises a usual warp or warp strand inade up of a rubber core I (Fig. 2) and a cov,

along itslength. The weft yarn has some inci-4 dental indefinite deterrent effect on such disruption. but not enough to prevent the substantial from a point (Fig 3) of linkage I4 with a. warp stitch chain I2 on'one warp portion 5, in weftwisedirection across and beyond a next adjacent warp portion 5, to a point of linkage I with a chain I2 on Aa third warp portion 5, then warp.

- wise to a point of like linkage I6, then in reverse weftwise direction to a chain linkage point I1 on the second or intermediate warp 5, then warpwise to a point I8 on the intermediate warp, then weftwise toa point I9, and warpwise to a point 20 on the third warp, and then back across and beyond the intermediate warp 5 to a point 2| linked with the chain of the starting warp.

' Thus, each'bodyweft yarn of the areas 6, has

' lengths 24 are disposed.

The tie-in means of the invention comprises a yarn 21, in this instance of silk, and of smaller diameter and 4greater strength than either the yarn of the warp stitch chains I2 -or the yarn of the weft areas 6. There is a separate tie-in yarn 21 disposed between` the warpwise portions 5 of each pair thereof, each extending through recurrent cycles, for instance as does one of them from a point 30 on the first warp to the left at the up per left hand corner of Fig. 3 along a. eftwise length 3| across the Space between adjacent warps 5 to a point 32 on the second warp, then along a warp stitch chain portion I2 in the form of a warp stitch chain 33 coincident with, or along each loop of, the chain I2 to apoint 34 and back, along a Weftwise length 35 to a point 3 6 on the original warp 5. A

The tie-in yarns 21, by reason of the smaller diameter thereof, may be caused to bite into the larger yarns oi the warp stitch chains I2 and the weft areas L6, whereby with their multi-point linkage with 'these yarns, and the cyclic configurations'diiferent from the configuration of the body yarn, to form a deinite disruption stopping point at each linkage; examples of the result of rupture of a warp stitch chain I2 being indicated in Fig. 3 at a position E, and of a weft yarn at a. position F. In each instance the broken yarn is tied or gripped at each side of the rupture by the tie-yarn 21 at a loop or bight of one of theA cover chains.

. The side of the fabric shown in Fig. fi is of flatter form, and simpler loop configuration, as contrasted with the opposite face of the fabric in' Fig..3 on which the warpwiseportions 5 upstand, with the consequent more extensive showing of the warp stitch chains and other portions.

In the arrangement whereby the weft yarns of the areas 6 extend back and forth between the chains I2 in warpwise spaced groups 38 (Fig. l) the spaces D are thereby formed between these groups 4to give the fabric its porous character. which may be varied by a yselection of patterns.

Of course the improvements specifically shown and described by which I obtain thevabove re suits, can be changed and modified in various ways without departing from the invention as herein disclosed and hereinafter claimed.

I claim:

1. A warp knit fabric including warps, yarns having warp stitch chain portions covering said warps, yarns having weft. portions and warp stitch chain portions following the warp stitch chain portions of said :first yarns, and strands having warp and weft portions and linking the chains of said yarns.

2. A warp knit fabric including warps, yarns having warp stitch chain portions covering said warps, yarns having weft portions and warp stitch chain portions coincident with the warp stitch chain portions of said first yarns, and strands having warp and weft portions and linking the chains of said yarns.

3. In a complete standard Warp knit fabric structure comprising parallel elastic body warps, interlooped cover yarns for the body warps subject to runs, and threads holding the cover yarnv of the respective warps to each other; a run guard strand interlaced between the cover yarns and holding threads in such manner that bights of the run guard strand are uniformly interspersed in locking relation with the cover yarns and holding threads of the fabric structure, whereby the latter is protected against disruption as a result of rupture of the yarns or threads at any particular point.

4. In a complete standard warp knit fabric structure comprising parallel elastic body warps, interlooped cover yarns for the body warps subject to runs, and threads holding the cover yarn of the respective warps to each other; a run guard strand of smaller diameter than said yarns and threads interlaced between the cover yarns and holding threads in such manner th bights of the run guard strand are uniformly interspersed in locking relation with the cover yarns and holding threads of the fabric structure, whereby the latter is protected against disruption as a result of rupture of the yarns or threads at any particular'point.

tion as a result of rupture of the yarns or threads at any particular point. l

6. In a complete standard warp knit fabric structure comprising parallel elastic body warps, interlooped cover yarns for the body warps subject to runs, and threads holding the cover yarn of the respective warps to each other; a run guard strand of smaller diameter and greater tensile strength than said yarns and threads interlaced between the cover yarns and holding l threads in such manner that bights of the run guard strand are uniformly interspersed in lockingprelation with the cover yarns and holding -threads of the fabric structure, whereby the latter is protected against disruption as a result of rupture of the yarns or threads at any particular point.

KURT

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2610496 *Dec 27, 1949Sep 16, 1952Kostopoulos Emanuel AVentilating and insulating undershirt
US2659957 *Sep 12, 1949Nov 24, 1953Julius E LilienfeldWeight supporting fabric
US2910853 *Mar 11, 1955Nov 3, 1959Narrow Fabric CompanyMethod of making elastic fabric
USD785340 *Nov 24, 2015May 2, 2017Milliken & CompanyFabric
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/192, D05/47, 2/DIG.900
International ClassificationD04B21/18
Cooperative ClassificationD04B21/18, Y10S2/09
European ClassificationD04B21/18