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Publication numberUS2159685 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1939
Filing dateMar 22, 1939
Priority dateMar 22, 1939
Publication numberUS 2159685 A, US 2159685A, US-A-2159685, US2159685 A, US2159685A
InventorsAlan Buzzell Dow
Original AssigneeAlan Buzzell Dow
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Concrete riprap
US 2159685 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 23, 1939 D. A; BUZZELL 2,159,685

CONCRETE RIPRAP Filed March 22, 1939 ATTORNEYS Patented May 23, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT o ica 2,159,685

CONCRETE RIPRAP Dow Alan Buzzell, Hastings, Nebr.

Application March 22, 1939, Serial No. 263,568

:3 Claims.

This invention relates to concrete ripraps and has for an object to provide precast units of such shapes and sizes that interlocking bars may be passed through orifices in the units formed toreceive them.

A further object is to provide a precast unit having separators or spacers which serve to properly space the units one from another and provide drainage spaces between the units.

A further object is'to provide a precast unit having an overhanging bulge or lip which promotes control of the free drainage spaces between the units.

A further object is to provide a unit of this character which may be formed in a single piece, which may be inexpensive to manufacture and assemble and which will not easily get out of order.

With the above and other objects in view the invention consists of certain novel details of con- I struction and combinations of parts hereinafter fullydescribed and claimed, it being understood xthat various modifications may be resorted to within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit or sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention.

A In the accompanying drawing forming part of this specification: Figure l is a longitudinal sectional view of a riprap formed of units constructed in accordance with the invention.

Figure 2 is a plan view of a riprap showing diagrammatically the joint at a corner thereof.

Figure 3 is a perspective view of one of the units showing the lip, spacers and passages therethrough.

Figure 4 is a front elevation of the unit shown in Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a cross sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Figure 4, through one of the openings or passages of the unit.

, Figure 6 is a cross sectional view taken on the line 6-6 of Figure 4 showing one of the spacers.

Referring now to the drawing in which like characters of reference designate similar parts in the various views, each unit of the riprap is precast of concrete asphaltic or ceramic majterial and comprises a body l!) of substantially rectangular cross section. The body is provided 50 with a pair of spaced substantially rectangular openings ll extending through the front and rear faces thereof. A bulge ledge or lip l2 projects forwardly from one face of the body at the top thereof and is of rounded contour in cross section, as best shown in Figure 5. A plurality of spacers l3 are formed integral with the body below the lip, these spacers being in the form of lugs, one of which is disposed between the openings II and the other two of which are disposed at the ends of the openings II, as best shown in Figure 3.,

The spacers l3 project slightly beyond the lip l2 and extend downwardly to substantially the bottom walls of the openings II, as best shown inFigure 5. The top H of each spacer is cut away obliquely to merge with the lip l2 and the sides and bottom of each spacer are beveled as shown respectively at l5 and IS in Figure 4.

The riprap is formed at the desired location of the precast units by assembling the units in rows on the ground to be protected with their openings H in registration with each other thus providing passages from the upper end to the lower end of the riprap as best shown in Figure 1. Through these passages steel reinforcing rods I! are engaged and the inner ends of the rods are connected by suitable couplings l8. The outer ends IQ of the rods are imbedded respectively in a conventional toe wall and in the conventional stirrup 2| of a conventional wave wall 22.

Gravel is poured in the spaces between the units as shown at 23. Gravel is poured, as shown at 24, in the aligned openings ll of the units and around thereinforcing rods IT.

The spacers l3 space the units from adjacent units a sufficient distance to provide free drainage, through the gravel, between adjacent units.

As best shown in Figure 2,'when the riprap is formed of units arranged at an angular inclination to each other to follow around curves and irregularities, an anchor of concrete is poured around the confronting ends of the units.

From the above description it is thought that the construction and operation of the invention will be fully understood without further explanation.

What I claim is:

1. A riprap unit comprising an elongated body of precast material having a plurality of longitudinal openings therein, an integral lip extending longitudinally of the entire length of the body and projecting forwardly from one face of the body at the top thereof and of rounded contour in cross section, and a plurality of spacers formed integral with the body below the lip and disposed to extend from the lip to the bottom walls of said openings at the ends of said openings.

2. A riprap unit-formed of precast material comprising an elongated body having a row of substantially rectangular openings therethrough,

a lip extending longitudinally of the entire length of the body and projecting forwardly from one face of the body at the top thereof and of rounded contour in cross section, and a plurality of spacers formed integral with the body'below the lip, said spacers extending downwardly from the lip between the ends of the openings and terminating adjacent the bottom walls of the openings, the top of each spacer being cut away obliquely to merge with the lip, the sides and bottom of each spacer being beveled.

3. A riprap comprising a plurality of units of precast material having registering longitudinal openings, lips extending longitudinally of the units and projecting forwardly from one face, spacers formed integral with each unit below the lip and disposed to extend from the lip to the bottom walls of said openings, gravel poured in the spaces between the units and in the aligned openings of the units, and longitudinally extending reinforcing tie rods extending through the aligned openings in the units.

DOW ALAN BUZZELL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2608065 *Sep 6, 1947Aug 26, 1952Richard A KubachBreakwater
US2827769 *Oct 18, 1954Mar 25, 1958Tait Hunter EldredGroin of variable permeability and a constructional unit therefor
US3368357 *Nov 3, 1965Feb 13, 1968Masayuki TakamoriStructure for breaking waves
US3722222 *Mar 9, 1971Mar 27, 1973Bitumarin NvSupport means for slope revetments
US4279536 *Mar 7, 1979Jul 21, 1981Jarlan Gerard EFlow-guiding monolithic blocks for marine structures
US4370075 *Oct 28, 1980Jan 25, 1983Nicolon CorporationRevetment grids and mats
US4896996 *Jan 23, 1989Jan 30, 1990Mouton William JWave actuated coastal erosion reversal system for shorelines
US4906130 *Jul 26, 1988Mar 6, 1990Davy Mckee CorporationAnti-scouring device for a dam stilling basin or approach
US4998844 *Jan 30, 1990Mar 12, 1991Charles C. Garvey, Jr.Wave actuated coastal erosion reversal system for shorelines
US5697736 *Aug 3, 1994Dec 16, 1997Custom Precast Concrete, L.L.C.Seawalls and shoreline reinforcement systems
US5988942 *Mar 11, 1997Nov 23, 1999Stewart Trustees LimitedErosion control system
US6491473Feb 5, 2001Dec 10, 2002Sidney E. VeazeyPrecast modular concrete shapes and methods of installation to form shoreline stabilization, marine and terrestrial structures
US7007620Dec 8, 2003Mar 7, 2006Se Ventures, Inc.Modular ships for transporting and installing precast modular intermodal concrete shapes
US7373892Mar 6, 2006May 20, 2008Veazey Sidney EProduction, transport and use of prefabricated components in shoreline and floating structures
US7603959Sep 28, 2007Oct 20, 2009Veazey Sidney EUse of prefabricated components in floating structures
US7762205Sep 28, 2007Jul 27, 2010Veazey Sidney ETransport and use of prefabricated components in shoreline and floating structures
US7992509Jul 26, 2010Aug 9, 2011Sidney Edwin VeazeyShellfish habitats
Classifications
U.S. Classification405/20
International ClassificationE02B3/14
Cooperative ClassificationE02B3/14
European ClassificationE02B3/14