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Publication numberUS2159947 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1939
Filing dateFeb 23, 1938
Priority dateNov 28, 1936
Publication numberUS 2159947 A, US 2159947A, US-A-2159947, US2159947 A, US2159947A
InventorsGansel Imre
Original AssigneeGansel Imre
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fixer for permanent catheters
US 2159947 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 23, 1939- l. GANSEL FIXER FOR PERMANENT CATHETERS Filed Feb. 23, 1958 ATTORNEY Fig. 1.

oooooooooo Ill-In 0 O O O O O O O O ooooowoooq Patented May 23, 1939 UNITED STATES- FIXER FOR PERMANENT OATHETERS Imre Gansel, Budapest, Hungary Application February 23, 1938, Serial No. 192,135 In' Hungary November 28, 1936 3 Claims.

Up to the present, continuously-worn. catheters were most frequently tied to the penis by a gauze or muslin dressing or, in numerous cases, by strips of adhesive plaster, or, according to the 5 more recently recommended processes, by means of vulcanised-rubber devices adapted specially for this purpose. Now, the correct application of a gauze or muslin dressing takes considerable time and calls for particularly skilled hands.

Moreover, the dressing hardens owing to the fact that it is gradually impregnated with urine and pus, so that it wounds and infects the penis. The almost hermetic confinement of the surfaces of the skin which are covered by the adhesive 5 plaster easily produce inflammation and eczema,

and, again, the strong adhesion of the plaster both to the hand and penis as Well as the catheter causes great difiiculty in applying the dressing and especially in changing it, which is frequently necessary. The devices made of rubber become slippery after they have become soaked with pus or urine and then no longer hold firmly. In addition, they are relatively expensive and are difiicult to handle and keep clean. Furthermore, they also prevent the respiration of the skin.

An object of the present invention is to provide a tying device which can be applied rapidly and without the need for special skill. Another object is the provision of an effective but much more hygienic device than hitherto. Another object is to provide a tying device which will hold the catheter firmly in position at all times but can nevertheless be rapidly and easily removed. A further object is to ensure proper ventilation of the skin and general comfort to the wearer.

The invention will be more fully explained in the following disclosure of a preferred embodiment thereof.

In the drawing:

40 Fig. 1 illustrates the two parts constituting the preferred tying device in developed form; and Fig. 2 illustrates the manner in which the device is utilised for tying the catheter to a penis.

My novel tying device comprises a strip adapted to encircle the penis behind the glans, another and preferably shorter strip adapted to encircle the catheter in front of the glans, and at least two, but preferably three, joining strips, which may be integral with either one or both of the encircling strips. The joining strips serve to connect the strip encircling the catheter with the strip encircling the penis. The Whole of the device, or at least the strip encircling the penis and the joining strips are preferably made of an extensible and elastic material which will stick to-itself. but not to the skin and the hairs, as, for example, non-vulcanised crepe rubber.

In the preferred embodiment illustrated in the drawing, three joining strips are connected to the short strip adapted to encircle the catheter, 5- and a long, separate, strip adapted to encircle the penis. This'embodimentis particularly rational and easy to handle and apply. The long strip a encircles the penis immediately behind the glans and the short strip 1) encircles the 10 catheter in front of the glans, the joining strips e e 6 being integral with the short strip 1). The short strip and the joining strips maybe easily formed from a rectangular sheet of material by making two outs part way along the sheet 15 as shown in Fig. 1. Two cuts, preferably of triangular shape, may also be made to form appendages or lugs d d one on each side of the strip b. The purpose of these lugs will be hereinafter described. 20

The strip a and the sheet cut to form the other parts described are preferably made of non-vulcanised crepe rubber. For example, they may consist of the dressing material known in commerce by the names of Ditmaplast and 25 Aaplica. This material does not stick to the skin and the hairs, but, on. the other hand, can be stuck to itself by exerting a slight pressure.

Referring to Fig. 2, in order to fix the tying device on the penis, the strip a is first placed around the penis P immediately behind the glans G and the two ends of this strip are then stuck to each other by pressing them together. The strip b is then placed in the same manner around a part of the catheter C in front of the glans. The 35 joining strips 6 e e which hang from the strip 1) are then stuck by their free ends onto the strip a. at substantially equidistant points around the circumference of this strip, so that these joining strips are placed on the glans without being 40 either too loose or too tight. Finally, the appendages (1 d which are separated from the strip b by elongated triangular gaps, are slightly stretched by pulling them apart and are wound around the strip b encircling the catheter. Ow- 4,5 ing to this tension of the appendages, the tendency of the outer strips e e to approach the middle strip e is overcome and, consequently, the adhesion of the joining strips with a uniform distribution around the strip a is ensured. 50

The tying device described allows of tying the catheter to the penis in one or two minutes.

In view of the fact that the material is porous and may also be provided with perforations f, the respiration of the skin is not prevented. More- 55 over, in view of the elastic extensibility of the material, an exact application of the parts of the tying device to the penis can be obtained without strangulation of the latter, and any constriction of the orifice of the channel in the catheter can be avoided with certainty. Even the erection of the penis can take place Without inconvenience and without having unpleasant consequences.

Moreover, the device may be washed with soap and water and leaves no unclean traces either on the penis or on the catheter. In view of the fact that the cost of manufacture of the device is low,

it may be replaced by a fresh one after being removed.

The catheter is, so to speak, anchored by the joining strips, so that it is impossible for it to slip ofi.

The appendages d (1 may be dispensed with or may be provided in some other form.

The various joining strips 6 e e are separated from one another by elongated triangular gaps of any desired width as are the appendages (1 d separated from the strip b.

The strip 1) may be made of a material which will stick to the skin and the hairs, as this is no disadvantage since, in use, the strip does not come into contact either with the skin or with the hairs.

The tying device is preferably marketed in developed form on a support of paper, muslin, or like material, to which its parts adhere in an easily separable manner;

I claim:

1. A tying device for catheters comprising a strip of flexible material for encircling the penis behind the glans, and a separate sheet of flexible material for tying the catheter to said strip, said sheet being out part way longitudinally at each end so as to comprise portions for securing it to the catheter in front of the glans, and a plurality of joining portions extending from said sheet portion for securing the sheet to the said penisencircling strip, said strip and sheet being cornposed of elastic material which adheres to itself but not to the skin or hair.

2. A tying device for catheters comprising a strip for encircling the penis behind the glans, a second strip for encircling the catheter in front of the glans, a plurality of joining strips for connecting said two encircling strips together, and tensioning strips attached to said second strip and adapted to be wound there around for correctly positioning said joining strips.

3. A tying device for catheters comprising a strip of flexible material for encircling the penis behind the glans, and a sheet of flexible material for tying the catheter to said strip, said sheet being out part way longitudinally so as to comprise a strip portion for securing to the catheter in front of the glans, a plurality of joining strips extending from said strip portion for securing to the said penis-encircling strip, and a pair of tensioning strips one on each side of said strip portion and adapted to be wound therearound for correctly positioning said joining strips.

IMRE GANSEL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3046989 *Sep 29, 1960Jul 31, 1962Edward J HillMeans for holding nasal tubes in position
US3138158 *Nov 2, 1962Jun 23, 1964Donald W GordonMeans for anchorage of surgical fluid injection and drainage tubes
US3927676 *Aug 1, 1974Dec 23, 1975Kenneth E SchultzEndotracheal tube securing device and method
US3977408 *Nov 1, 1974Aug 31, 1976Mackew Allan HProsthetic catheter
US4237894 *Jun 8, 1979Dec 9, 1980Cohen Milton JMale catheter
US4419097 *Jul 31, 1981Dec 6, 1983Rexar Industries, Inc.Attachment for catheter tube
US5221265 *Mar 25, 1992Jun 22, 1993Lohmann Gmbh & Co. KgFor fastening a medical accessory to skin
DE9103742U1 *Mar 27, 1991Jun 13, 1991Lohmann Gmbh & Co Kg, 5450 Neuwied, DeTitle not available
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/180, 236/44.00R, 128/DIG.260
International ClassificationA61M25/02
Cooperative ClassificationY10S128/26, A61M25/02, A61M2025/0273
European ClassificationA61M25/02