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Publication numberUS2159962 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 30, 1939
Filing dateNov 4, 1936
Priority dateNov 4, 1936
Publication numberUS 2159962 A, US 2159962A, US-A-2159962, US2159962 A, US2159962A
InventorsBlood Harold L
Original AssigneeHeald Machine Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hone
US 2159962 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. L. BLOOD May 30, 1939.

norm Filed Nov. 4', 1 936 I :zfiwazwaaz Patented May 1939 "UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE noun Application November 4, 1936, Serial No. 109,125

7 Claims.

The present invention relates to a hone and particularly to a'hone adapted for use in the finishing of tapered or cylindrical surfaces, as for example, the raceway on the inner race of a 5 roller bearing.

In prior devices of this character, the honing member, which is preferably in the form of an abrasive stone, has been relatively small in size and is soon worn down to a, point where it is no longer usable and must be replaced. This is especially true where the hone isincorporated in a high speed automatii machine for rapid finishing successively of a p urality of work-pieces. It will be apparent that whenever one of the honing stones becomes worn so as not'to be usable, the

machine must be stopped for replacement of the stone. Not only is this a. waste of productive machine time, but it also makes the honing operations relatively expensive since a substantial portion of each honing stone must be discarded. The principal object of the present invention is to provide an arrangement by which a relatively large stone may be used for the honing operation so that the stone will last a relatively longtime before replacement is required.

Furthermore, when new honing stones are substituted for worn ones, the new stones must be dressed by a suitable dressing tool to the proper shape to correspond to the taper and curvature 3:) of the surface being honed. A further object of the invention is to provide an arrangement which will permit the use of a stone of substantial size which can be adjusted within the carrying members, but which will avoid the necessity for dressing operations after each adjustment.

Other and further objects and advantages of the invention will hereinafter more fully appear from the following /detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which- I Fig. 1 is a sectional view through a bone embodying the invention-the section being substan-- tially along the broken line l-I of 2.

.Fig. 2 is an end elevation of the hone of Fig. 1

45 with parts broken away.

Fig. 3 is aside elevation of one of the hone elements.

Fig. 4 is a side. elevation of carries the honing stone. 50 Like reference characters refer to like parts in 1 the different figures. I

With reference first. to Fig. 1, the honeembodying the invention is mounted on a spindle I journalled in a, housing 2 and the spindle has an 5-3 axially slidable plunger 3 by whichto procure the lever which expansion and contraction of the hone. One form of mechanism for expanding and contracting the hone .is fully described in the copending application of Blood and Schmidt, Serial No. 103,725, filed October 2, 1936. It is sufiicient to 5 note for the purpose of the present application that movement of the end of the rod 3 to the right procures movement of the honing stones into operative position, and movement of the rod to the left withdraws the stones from operl ative position, the movements of the rod being imparted by a suitable mechanism.

The hone embodying the invention comprises an arbor 4, which, as best shown, in Fig. 3, has a plurality of radial slots 5 therein. The arbor also has a cylindrical hub 6 for attachment of the hone to the end of the spindle I. A lever I is positioned in each of the slots 5 and has an arcuate lug 8 at the inner end thereof for engagement in a corresponding arcuate recess 9 in the end of a member III positioned in a central bore in the arbor 4. The arcuate lug 8 and cooperat ing recess 9 provide a freepivotal connection between the lever and the member II) so that any one of the members may be readily replaced without difliculty. The member I0 is held against movement withinthe arbor bya pin II and has a plurality of radially extending spring pressed plungers I2 engaging with the corresponding levers I between opposite ends thereof for urging 90 said levers outwardly relative to the arbor. A sleeve I3 surrounds the arbor and has a plurality of bevelled surfaces I 4, each of which is engageable with a roller I5 positioned between the corresponding bevelled surface and a notch I9 on the 85 adjacent lever I. g

A spindle I 6 is axially slidable within the arbor and has secured to the end thereof a member II, having a plurality of integral radially extending fingers. tioned at the bases of the several slots 5, and the ends thereof engage with the sleeve I3 to urge the latter to the right in response to the movement of the spindle, I6 to the right, thelatter being shifted by the corresponding movement of the actuating rod 3. It will be noted that as the sleeve I3 moves to the right, each roller-I5 is carried to the right from a surface I8 of the notch I9 in the lever I, in which the roller is positioned,

to a surface 20 making a substantial angle withl.60 the longitudinal axis of the lever I, so that the.

of the levers I is so arranged that the roller The fingers on the member H are posi- 40 is held in its operative position between the lever and the cooperating bevel surface M at all times.

The outer end of each lever I has a rectangular opening 2| substantially at right angles to-the longitudinal axis of the lever, and the end of the latter, beyond the opening, is also split, as at 22, to provide for clamping the lever against a honing stone 23 in the form of a bar of abrasive material, the latter corresponding in cross-section to the opening 2|, and being positioned therein. A

clamping screw 24 provides for locking the stone 23 in position in the lever and makes possible an adjustment of the bar in the lever after the end of the bar is worn to an appreciable amount.

The stone is originally dressed to a surface represented by the line 25, Fig. l, which, extended,

passes approximately through the center of the arcuate lug 8 about which the lever 1 oscillates. The originally dressed surface of the stone is obviously arcuate to correspond to the curvature of the workpiece to be honed, and the angle between the dressed surface of the stone and the inner face 29 of the stone is slightly more than a right angle. The stone is then used until the honing surface thereof is worn down to a surface represented by the line 26, Fig. 1, which also passes approximately through the center of the arcuate lug 8 and which makes an angle with the outer face 28 of the stone substantially equal to the angle between the inner face 29 of the stone and the line 25. The mean line of wear, represented by a line 21, Fig. 1, midway between the lines 25 and 26, is at right angles to the sides of the stone 23, and the angles between this line and the lines 25 and 26, respectively, are equal. The angle between the outside face 28 of the stone and the line 25 is thus equal to the angle between the inside face 29 and the line 26. By this arrangement, the stone when worn to the line 26 can be adjusted by turning the stone in the lever so that the inside face 29 becomes the out-. side face, and advancing the stone longitudinally until the end .of the stone assumes a position represented by the line 25, with which the end of the stone will coincide, being at the same angle to the now outside face 29.

In the operation of the device the hone is'normally expanded into'inoper'ative position by a movement of the plunger 3 to the left, thereby allowing a corresponding movement of the sleeve l3 to the left and permitting the honing stones .workholder, not shown. A movement of the plunger 3 to the right will then move the honing members inwardly into engagement with the outer tapered surface of the workpiece for a honing operation thereon. The stones 23 have initially been dressed to conform to the taper and curvature of the workpiece surface, the dressed surface being represented in Fig. 1 by the line 25, which, as above stated, passes substantially through the point of oscillation of the lever 1.

The honing operations are performed in the usual manner with each successive operation terminated by any suitable mechanism, which may be, for example, the timing mechanism of the Blood and Schmidt application, Serial No. 103,725, filed October 2, 1936. After the stone worn to a predetermined extent, as when the face of the stone reaches a position represented by the line 26, which also passes approximately through the point of oscillation of the lever 1, the

stone 23 is shifted within the lever 1 to compensate for the wear on the stone.

During the preceding honing operations, the angle of the honing surface of the stone relative to the longitudinal axis thereof has/changed substantially, and if the stone is merely advanced longitudinally in the lever I, the honing face will no longer be in the proper relation to the workpiece surface. However, the opening 2| through the lever I is so arranged that the longitudinal axis of the stone is at right angles to the medial line of wear, represented by the line 21, and thus when the stone 23 is not only advanced to compensate for wear thereon, but is turned so that the edge nearest to the clamping screw 2| assumes the workpiece surface.

Although it is above stated that the stone is originally dressed to a surface represented by the line 25 which is not at right angles to the axis of thestone, it will be apparent that in certain instances the stone may be originally dressed to any surface between the lines 25 and 26 so long as the amount of wear does not extend beyond the line 26 and so long as the longitudinal adjustment of the stone, after having been worn to a point represented by the line 26, is suflicient to bring the operative surface into a position represented'by the line 25.

It will be understood that the machine may be arranged to provide for automatic stopping of the machine, after a predetermined amount of wear on the stone, by incorporating in the arrangement disclosed the automatic control mechanism of the copending application of Blood and Schmidt, Serial No. 103,725, above referred to. By this arrangement the stone will not be worn beyond. a position represented by the line 26 before the machine is stopped to provide for a reversal and advance of the stone within the carrying lever to compensate for wear thereon. The actual spacing of the surfaces represented by the lines 25 and 26 is much smaller than the these stones being arranged so that once the cutting surface has been shaped (as by dressing) to correspond to the workpiece surface, no further shaping operations will be necessary during the l fe of the stone. The adjustment of the stones relative to the supporting structure for compensating for wear without necessitating a further dressing operation, involves the advancing of the stone relative to the supporting structure in a direction substantially at right angles to the honing face, or to the medial line of wear. The stone is also turned relative to the supporting structure through an angle of about an axis substantially at right angles to the honing face.

I claim:

1. In a hone, an arbor, a plurality of levers mounted thereon, a honing element carried by each lever, a sleeve axially slidable on'the arbor, and a connection betweenthe sleeve and each lever forsimultaneous oscillation of the levers mounted thereon, a honing element mounted on each lever, a member axially'slidable relative' to said arbor, and a connection between the member and each lever for simultaneous oscillation of the levers in response to movement of the member, said connection including a roller engageableby the member and each lever one of the elements engageable with the roller having a notch therein in which the roller is located.

3. In a hone, an arbor,'a lever pivotally mounted for movement on said arbor, a honing member carried by the lever, a sleeve surrounding the arbor and lever and axially slidable on the arbor for movingthe lever into and out of operative position, and a roller positioned between and engageable by the sleeve and the lever, one of the elements engageable by the roller having a notch in which the roller is positioned.

4. In a hone, an arbor, a lever pivotally mounted on the arbor, said lever-having a free pivotal connection with the arbor, a honing member carried by the lever, a sleeve surrounding the arbor and positioned outside of the lever, and a. con- 'nection between the sleeve and lever for urging the latter into and out of operative position in response to axial movement of the sleeve, said sleeve by its location outside of the lever holding the lever in engagement with the arbor.

5. In a hone, an arbor, a lever pivotally mounted on the arbor, said lever having a free pivotal connection with the arbor, a honing member carried by the lever, a sleeve surrounding the arbor and positioned outside of the lever, a! connection between the sleeve and lever for urging the latter.

into operative position in response to axial move ment of the sleeve, said sleeve by its position outside of the lever holding thev lever and arbor in interengagement, and means for normally urging the lever toward the sleeve and out of operative position.

6. In the honing of workpieces by a honing member carried by a pivotally mounted lever,

the honing member being adjustable in the lever in a direction substantially perpendicular to a plane passing through the working face of the member and the pivotal support of the lever, the step which involves adjusting the member longitudinally in the lever and simultaneously turning the member through an angle of 180 about its longitudinal axis after the member is worn down so that the working, face is inclined to the longitudinal axis of the member, the extent of longitudinal adjustment being substantially equal to twice the amount that themember is worn away beyond the point where the face of the member is at right angles to the longitudinal axis thereof.

7. In the honing of workpieces by a honing member carried by a pivotally mounted lever, the honing member being'adjustable in the lever in a-direction substantially perpendicular to a plane passing through the working face of the member and the pivotal support of the lever, the working face of the member being originally inclined to the longitudinal axis thereof, the step which involves adjusting the member longitudinally in the lever and simultaneously-turning the member through an angle of 180 about its longitudinal axis after the member is worn down so that the working face thereof is inclined to the longitudinal axis in the opposite direction to its original inclination and at substantially the same angle.

HAROLD L. BLOOD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2736146 *Dec 10, 1953Feb 28, 1956 brooks
US3094820 *Aug 1, 1962Jun 25, 1963Fafnir Bearing CoHoning stone retainer
US4328647 *Apr 9, 1980May 11, 1982Brammall, Inc.Inside, outside honing tool
US4449328 *Feb 5, 1982May 22, 1984Brammall, Inc.Inside, outside honing tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification451/471, 451/485, 451/480
International ClassificationB24B33/08, B24B33/00
Cooperative ClassificationB24B33/081
European ClassificationB24B33/08B