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Publication numberUS2160729 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 30, 1939
Filing dateJul 9, 1936
Priority dateJul 9, 1936
Publication numberUS 2160729 A, US 2160729A, US-A-2160729, US2160729 A, US2160729A
InventorsGraham James E, Lines Edwin M
Original AssigneeBird & Son
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sound-deadening wall and material
US 2160729 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 30, 1939- J. E. GRAHAM ET AL SOUND-DEADENING WALL AND MATERIAL Filed July 9, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 "1,1, I J/// Q\ May 3 1939- J. E. GRAHAM Er AL 2,160,729

SOUND-DEADENING WALL AND MATERIAL Filed July 9, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENT BY y In #m We ATTORNE Patented May 30, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,100,129 V soUNn-nasnsnmo WALL AND MATERIAL chusetts Application July 9, 1936, Serial No. 89,790

istics. A most important characteristic of the wall of this invention lies in the improved ability of the wall to absorb sound waves and the improvement in this respect is believed to be due to the flexible, though apparently rigid, multi-layer s material which, though unitary with respect to application to thewall, includes separate adherent layers of material of wholly different characteristics, plus a surface or exposed lightecolored film or layer adherent thereto.

Prior to this invention, it has been suggested that a sound-deadening wall might include porous material in layer form, for example, cloth or felt, and such material, after being attached to a plaster or other equivalent permanent wall backing, was then treated when in place to provide an ornamental surface. Such suggestions, however, have not been adopted generally and practically to any appreciable extent and, moreover, involve hand labor and expense and considerable time after being attached before the wall can be provided with an acceptable light-colored surface as is required for home construction. The present invention, however, provides a complete and substantially finished wall and one which advanu tageously may be used at once with or without additional treatment, and at the same time provides the all important sound-deadening characteristics to which the invention is particularly directed.

In the accompanying drawings which form part of this specification:

Fig. l is a front elevation, with parts broken away, illustrating our invention;

Fig. 2 is a vertical transverse section of the wall of this invention; and

Fig. 3 is a perspective view illustrating the novel sound-deadening material and the manufacture thereof. 7

Referring to the drawings in which like numerals represent like parts, the usual permanent outside wall of a building is generally indicated at 2 and, as here shown, includes studding l, sheathing 8, heat-insulating paper 1, and shingles or the like! on the outside of said insulating paper or the like.

To the inside of such permanent wall 2, there is attached by nails 9 or other suitable fastening to the studding l, or equivalent structure, a wall board backing l0 and adhesively secured thereto by an adhesive layer of cement l2, sodium silicate for example, is a unitary multi-layer, flexible sound-deading material, generally designated at ll. Said unitary multi-layer material It comprises an open porous layer of rag and paper (water-laid) felt l6 having corrugations II, as hereinafter more fully described, to which felt ,IB is adhesively attached, by means of a layer of flexible and preferably water-proof cement It, a water-proof layer of felt 20. Preferably the water-proof layer 20 is saturated with asphalt which saturant itself or asphalt additionally applied fiexibly and adhesively attaches said waterproof layer 20 to theopen or porous layer It, though rubber or other flexible cements will adequately serve. The water-proof layer 20 carries upon its outside surface a light-colored flexible and ornamental pigmented layer or layers 22 which are adhesively held to the layer 20 by reason of the binder or binders in said layer 22. In practice and preferably said ornamental layer 22 is made up of two layers applied'to and made a part of the unitary multi-layer material at the time of manufacture thereof and prior to the combining and adhesive attachment together of the layers It and 20 by the flexible cement l8. It has been found in practice that the waterproof layer 20, even when previously waterproofed by being saturated with asphalt in an amount equal to or greater than its own weight, may be provided with a light-colored or even white pigmented surface by coating the asphalt saturated layer with a water-emulsified linseed oil paint, and hence in the absence of any thinner which would have a solvent action on the underlying asphalt or like black hydro-carbonaceous materiaiwhich solvent thinner, as in an ordinary oil paint, would cause a staining of the pigmented surface by reason of its solvent action on said asphalt or the like. Moreover, such layer is found in practice to be sufllciently tough and flexible as to permit a reasonable amount of bending of the unitary multi-layer material so that it may be bent around corners as small as a radius of say "/8" for the outside corners where the paint layer is in tension and a radius of or even smaller, for inside corners where the paint layer is in compression. If desired, however, to obtain an even better and smoother finish, an additional and flexible coat of oil paint including a hydro-carbon solvent is preferably applied to the coat of wateremulsified paint just mentioned and it has been found that the coat of water-emulsified paint, when dried, effectively provides a barrier layer .between the solvent of such after-applied paint and the preferred asphaltic saturant of the layer- 20. If desired, the layer 22 may be so pigmented, applied, or indented as to provide the appearance of a rough plastered or stippled or textured surface. In order to provide sufficient flexibility for the relatively thick unitary multi-layer sounddeadening material so that it may be rolled and unrolled without substantial fracture or cracking of the material when so rolled and unrolled and during the application thereof to the wall board backing, it is highly desirable and in most cases necessary that the said layer l6 be corrugated or indented by a series of parallel lines and/or continuous or discontinuous indentations ill, the lines of such corrugations or the like being at right angles to the length of the material and parallel to the axis of the roll. In the preferred product in which each layer has a minimum thickness of at least .020 and is preferably .026" to .040" the corrugations or indentations may suitably be in parallel lines approximately A or thereabouts apart. Such a layer further tends to better bridge any small irregularities in the wall board backing, and such dry felt material though possessing little inherent strength is sufficiently stiffened and held in place by the asphalt saturated layer 20 of relatively high tensile strength and stiffness. The aggregate thickness of the finished product including the light-colored layer or layers 22 is of the order of .070" to .075" which gives adequate thickness and characteristics for the sound-deadening as heretofore described, as well as suf icient stiffness and body to provide a durable and attractive wall having the novel and useful characteristics as herein described.

The sound absorption capacity of a wall made in accordance with this invention as above described, is found to be much greater than that of an ordinary plaster wall made up of lime or gypsum plaster including scratch, brown and finished coats on wood-lath. The figures of ac tual tests made of such sound absorption coefd= cients are as follows:

Sound cycles 128 256 512 i024 2040 Our structure .070 .160 .210 .380 .330 Ordinary gypsum plaster .020 .022 .032 .039 .039 Ordinary lime plaster .024 .027 .030 .037 .010

In addition to such striking sound absorption characteristics, the wall, in practice, is found to have very good heat insulating characteristics. Moreover, it forms a ready and practical substitute for plaster construction at a substantial saving in the cost of lath, plaster, labor and necessary drying time, before woodeninterior trim may be installed. Besides, the wall is permanent Without any likelihood of cracking or other failure due to excessive swelling and shrinking such as inevitably result from the application of wet plaster, and does not shatter due to vibration and shock as does an ordinary plaster wall.

Having described our invention, what we wish to claim and secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In association with a building wall construction which includes a permanent wall portion and a layer of wall board affixed to said permanent wall portion and providing a continuous wall board backing, an adherent flexible multi-layer unit adhesively secured to said wall board backing, said unit comprising a series of layers, including a porous open water-laid felt layer adjacent said backing, a water-proof saturated felt layer permanently united to said felt layer, said water-proof saturated layer having permanently united. thereto upon the exposed surface thereof a relatively light-colored pigmented surface coating.

2. In association with a building wall construction which includes a permanent wall portion "and a layer of wall board affixed to said permanent wall portion and providing a continuous Wall board backing, an adherent flexible multilayer unit adhesively secured to said wall board backing, said unit comprising a series of layers including a Vertically corrugated porous, open felted layer adjacent said backing, a water-proof saturated layer permanently united to said felt.

layer, said water-proof saturated felt layer having permanently united thereto upon the exposed surface thereof a relatively light-colored pigmerited flexible surface coating.

3. In association with a building wall construction which includes a permanent wall portion and a layer of wall board affixed to said permanent wall portion and providing a continuous wall board backing, an adherent flexible layer of porous water-laid felt adhesively secured to said Wall board backing, a layer of flexible water-proof adhesive on the opposite surface of said felt, a water-proof saturated layer of felt permanently united to said felt layer, said Water-proof saturated layer having permanently united thereto upon the exposed surface thereof a relatively light-colored pigmented flexible surface coating.

4. In association with a building wall construetion which includes a permanent wall portion and a layer of wall board affixed to said permanent Wall portion and providing a continuous wall board backing, an adherent flexible layer of porous water-laid felt adhesively secured to said wall board backing, a layer of flexible waterproof adhesive on the opposite surface of said felt, a water-proof asphalt saturated layer of felt permanently united to said felt layer, said asphalt saturated layer having permanently united thereto upon the exposed surface thereof a relatively light-colored pigmented flexible surface coating.

5. In association with a building wall construc tion which includes a permanent wall portion and a layer of wall board affixed to said permanent wall portion and providing a continuous Wall board backing, a flexible layer of water-laid felt adhesively secured bya water-soluble cement to said wall board backing, a layer of water-proof flexible cement on the opposite side of said felt, a Water-proof saturated layer of felt permanently united by said cement to said felt layer, said water-proof saturated layer of felt having permanently united thereto upon the exposed surface thereof a relatively light-colored pigmented water-proof flexible surface coating.

6. In association with a building wall construction which includes a permanent wall portion and a layer of wall board affixed to said permanent wall portion and providing a continuous Wall board backing, a flexible layer of water-laid felt adhesively secured by a water-soluble cement to said wall board backing, a layer of water-proof flexible cement on the opposite side of said felt, a water-proof asphalt saturated layerof felt permanently united by said cement to said felt layer, said asphalt saturated layer of felt having permanently united thereto upon the exposed surface thereof a relatively light-colored pigmented water-proof flexible surface coating.

7. In association with a building wall construction which includes a permanent wall portion and a layer of wall board aflixed to said permanent wall portion and providing a continuous wall board backing, an adherent flexible multilayer unit adhesively secured to said wall board backing, said unit comprising a series of layers, including a porous, open felted layer adjacent said backing, a water-proof saturated felt layer permanently and adhesively united by a waterproof flexible cement to said felt layer, said water-proof saturated felt layer having permanently united thereto upon the exposed surface thereof a relatively light-colored pigmented flexible surface coating.

8. A building wall sound-deadening material comprising a flexible multi-layer unit made up of a series of layers including a porous open, water-laid felt layer, a flexible water-proof cement on one side thereof, a water-proof saturated felt layer permanently united by said cement to said felt layer, and permanently united to said water-proof saturated layer upon the exposed surface thereof a relatively light-colored pigmented flexible surface coating.

9. A building wall sound-deadening material comprising a flexible multi-layer unit made up of a series of layers including a porous open, water-laid felt layer, a flexible water-proof cement on one side thereof, a water-proof asphalt saturated felt layer permanently united by said cement to said felt layer, and permanently united to said asphalt saturated layer upon the exposed surface thereof a relatively light-colored pigmented flexible surface coating.

comprising a 10. A building wall sound-deadening material comprising a flexible multi-layer unit made up of a series of layers including a porous open, water-laid felt layer transversely indented, a flexible water-proof cement on one side thereof, a water-proof saturated felt layer permanently united by said cement to said felt layer, and permanently united to said water-proof saturated layer upon the exposed surface thereof a relatively light-colored pigmented flexible surface coating.

11. A building wall sound-deadening material flexible multi-layer unit in transportable roll form, said unit being made up of a series of layers includinga porous open waterlaid felt layer transversely indented, a flexible water-proof cement on one side thereof, a waterproofed felt layer permanently united by said cement to said first mentioned felt layer, and having permanently united to said water-proofed layer upon the exposed surface thereof a relatively light-colored pigmented flexible surface coating.

2. A building wall sound-deadening material comprising a flexible multi-layer unit in transportable roll form, said unit being made up of a series of layers including a porous open waterlaid felt layer, a flexible water-proof cement on one side thereof, a water-proofed felt layer permanently united by said cement to said first mentioned felt layer, and having permanently united to said water-proofed layer uponthe exposed surface thereof a relatively light-colored pigmented flexible surface coating.

JAMES E. GRAHAM. EDWIN M. LINES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2450786 *Aug 15, 1944Oct 5, 1948American Associated CompaniesWall covering and method of applying same
US3401069 *Jun 26, 1964Sep 10, 1968Harold G. LorentzenMethod for installing resinous floor coverings
US5665447 *Oct 18, 1995Sep 9, 1997Owens-Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Sound screen insulation with asphalt septum
US5965851 *Jan 28, 1997Oct 12, 1999Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Acoustically insulated apparatus
US7524778Nov 8, 2004Apr 28, 2009Henkel CorporationComposite sheet material
US7785437Jan 26, 2007Aug 31, 2010L&P Property Management CompanyAnti-microbial carpet underlay and method of making
US7875343Oct 31, 2007Jan 25, 2011L & P Property Management Companycoating a pad and forming a laminated film; contains foam particles bonded together by a binder including zinc pyrithione; linear low density polyethylene homo- or copolymer
US8807275 *Sep 1, 2011Aug 19, 2014Echo Barrier LimitedSound absorbent barrier
US20130161126 *Sep 1, 2011Jun 27, 2013Echo Barrier LimitedSound Absorbent Barrier
Classifications
U.S. Classification442/326, 156/71, 428/317.1, 181/294, 52/390, 52/144
International ClassificationE04B1/82, E04B1/84
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/82, E04B2001/8461, E04B1/8409
European ClassificationE04B1/82, E04B1/84C