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Publication numberUS2160768 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 30, 1939
Filing dateSep 7, 1937
Priority dateSep 7, 1937
Publication numberUS 2160768 A, US 2160768A, US-A-2160768, US2160768 A, US2160768A
InventorsWasser Harry N
Original AssigneeEllwood Safety Appliance Compa
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foot guard
US 2160768 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. N. WASSER FOOT GUARD May 30, 1939.

Filed Sept. 7, 1937 IN Wok M nssu' A ORNEY.

Patented May 30, 1939 UNITED STATES FOOT GUARD Harry N. Wasser, Ellwood City, Pa., assignor to EllwoodSafety Appliance Company, Ellwood City, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application September 7, 1937, Serial No. 162,590

15 Claims.

This invention relates to foot protectors and more particularly to a combined toe and foot protector adapted to be worn over the shoes of workmen in industrial plants to protect the feet of the workmen against falling objects.

In rolling mills and other industrial plants workmen are often engaged in handling heavy objects such as billets weighing more than a hundred pounds, and in many instances such objectsare allowed to slip or fall either on the feet of the workman himself, or onto the feet of other workmen, causing crushed toes and other painful injuries.

The present foot protector is constructed of 16 relatively light metal, but due to its novel construction has suflicient stiffness and strength to withstand the blows from any object that a man can handle. Also due to the novel shape and construction of the foot protector of this application,

20 any blow or shock delivered to the foot protector will be delivered by the protector directly to the ground, due to the fact that the body of the protector bridges over the Wearers foot and has its lower edges in engagement with the ground.

The foot guard or protector described herein is generally of the type shown in U. S. Patent 1,640,669, issued August 30, 1927, to Clinton E.

Sankey, and is intended to provide certain improvements and novel features of design and construction that are of particular utility in a foot guard of that type.

One of the objects of my invention is to provide a foot guard of such construction that it will always be held in place directly against the ground upon which the wearer may be standing.

Another object of my invention is to provide a foot guard of the type described that shall be relatively quiet during walking movements of the wearer.

Another, and important, objectof this invention is to provide a method of and means for supporting the foot protector on the wearers shoe-encased foot so that the shoe shall move with the foot, and no swinging motion of the shoe shall be permitted with respect to the foot while the wearer of the guard is walking or otherwise moving his foot, thereby eliminating any forces of the guard upon the foot other than direct weight.

Y 5 Another important object of the invention is the moment arm of the weight or gravity force of the guard to a minimum.

Another object of this invention is to provide a supporting arrangement for supporting the guard on the shoe-encased foot of the wearer in such 5 manner as to provide a soft, yielding contact between the guard and the foot of the wearer, so that the guard may be lightly and fioatingly supported on the foot of the wearer.

A further object of this invention is to provide 10 a fastening device and arrangement to attach the guard to the shoe of the wearer and to detach it from the shoe of the wearer easily and quickly.

A further object of the invention is to provide an attaching means which may be easily and I quickly adjusted to adapt the guard to fit the instep and shoe of all wearers. A foot guard'of the type described and modified according to the principle of my invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which 20 Figure 1 is a longitudinal and elevational side view of the guard shown as applied to the foot of a wearer;

Figure 2 is a plan view of the foot guard of this invention; and 25 Figure 3 is a rear view of the guard shown in Figure 2.

As shown in the drawing, the foot protector or guard Ill consists of a metal shell or body I I that is generally arched or convex in cross-section to bridge over and cover the toe and instep of the foot of the person wearing the guard. The shell body II is generally open at the bottom except for a short space at the front or toe of the shell 5 where a toe piece l3 of rubber or other suitable sound-deadening material is secured to the front part of the shell body by suitable securing means such as the rivets I4. The rivets l4 extend through the wall of the shell body I I and through 0 a vertical flange I5 of the rubber toe piece [3. The rubber toe piece is provided also with a base portion I6 which extends across and underneath the shell body I 1 adjacent the front portion thereof. The base It of the rubber toe piece extends 45 inwardly from the front edge of the guard a short distance suflicient to extend under the front portion of the shoe of a wearer, and serves several purposes as will be later explained.

Except for the bottom space of the guard across which the rubber toe piece extends, the guard body is generally open on the bottom. Moreover, it is made of a width sufliclent to clear the sides of the shoe of a wearer and is of a height sufficient to clear the top of the instep of the wearers shoe when the lower edges of the shell body are in engagement with the ground.

The shell body of the guard is preferably made of a relatively light gauge metal plate and is forged or pressed into shape from one piece of metal plate. Any metal of high strength may be employed, but the lightness in weight is, of course, an important item. The shell body may be made of steel plate, although I have made the shell body of high tensile strength aluminum alloy, which has been found satisfactory.

In order to impart additional strength to the shell body, the body is provided with a plurality of transversely extending stiffening and reinforcing ribs or corrugations 3 and 4 on each side of a centrally arranged longitudinally extending stiffening and reinforcing rib or corrugation 5. These ribs or corrugations 3, 4, and 5 are pressed up slightly on the body and have a convex crosssection, and serve to materially strengthen the body against collapse, and consequently permit a lighter gauge metal to be used for the shell body than could otherwise be used. I

The rear ends of the lower edges of the shell body are cut away to form inclined surfaces l8 and I9, and they are connected by a rigid tie member 20 that is riveted or otherwise secured to the sides of the body by fastening means such as rivets 2!. The tie member 20 serves a double purpose. It serves first to prevent the spreading of the side portions of the arched body, and serves also to hold, the guard down on the foot of the wearer, as will be explained in more detail later.

In order to fasten the guard to the shoeenoased foot of the wearer an adjustable strap or leather thong 25 is provided, to the ends of which a resilient spring element 28 is connected in such manner as to fit around the heel of the shoe of the wearer.

The strap 25 preferably consists'of two parts in order to provide a point of adjustment by means of a buckle 21 on the top and outside of the shell body. The shell body is provided with four openings 3|, 32, 33, and 34 through which the supporting strap 25 is laced in the manner shown in Figures 2 and 3, so that the strap will cross above the instep of the wearer and thus provide a supporting point whereby the strap will serve to support the guard on the instep with'a soft cushioning effect. a

The other ends of the strap are provided with suitable connecting means such as eyelets 31 and 33 to and from which snap fasteners 39 and 40 are readily attached and detached. The snap fasteners are secured to the ends of a long helical spring 42 which is encircled by a rubber tube 63 fitting loosely over the spring 42 in such manner as to permit a certain amount of rotation with respect to the helical spring 42. The spring and the rubber tube 52 constitute the connecting member 25 by means of which the guard may be secured to the shoe of the wearer.

When the guard is to be applied to the shoeencased foot of the wearer, the shoe is extended into the guard between the cross-tie 20 and the space beneath the V-point 56 of the connecting strap 25 and extended into the guard to a point where the toe of the shoe will rest upon the base 16 of the toe piece 53. The rubber covered spring attaching member 26 is then raised to surround the back of the shoe above the heel in the manner shown in Figure 1. The guard is thus easily and readily attachable to the shoe.

In order to remove the guard, the back securing shoe either manually or by the other foot of the wearer, and the guard then dropped oif the wearers shoe.

When the wearers shoe-encased foot is in position within the guard as shown in Figure 1, the toe of the shoe will rest upon the base it of the toe piece E3 of the guard. The cross-tie 20 of the guard will rest against the lower part of the shoe in front of the heel where it will be held in place against that part of the shoe due to the resiliency of the cross-strap 25 which will ten-d to raise the guard upward from the instep. This arrangement thus provides a relatively stable three-point connection between the guard and the shoe of the wearer, namely, one point being where the'toe of the shoe engages the base l6 of the rubber toe piece of the guard, and the second point being where the cross-tie 20' of the guard engages the under the surface of the shoe, and the third point being where the strap 25 rests upon the instep of the shoe of the wearer. By means of this three-point connection between the guard and the shoe, a relatively'stable and positive connection is made which prevents a sloppy fit and swinging relative movement of the guard with respect to the foot that would be unpleasant and annoying to the wearer. At the same time, the guard is secured to the foot through the soft cross-strap 25 which is readily adaptable to the shape of the instep and provides a soft cushioning fit that does not cause any discomfort from excessive pressure to the wearer.

A further advantage of the manner of supporting the guard on the instep of the shoe through the V-shaped cross-strap is that it brings the point of contact between the guard and the foot, through which the pressure or gravity force line will act on the foot, to a point as close as possible to the ankle about which the foot articulates. The moment arm of the gravity force or weight of the guard about the ankle is therefore reduced to a minimum so far as the shape of the normal human foot will permit, and the weight effect or force of the guard that would make itself felt on the foot. of the wearer is therefore reduced to a minimum.

Thus, by reason of the manner in which the guard is supported on and secured to the foot of a wearer, it provides maximum safety with minimum discomfort or annoyance. A guard of the type shown herein may be Worn over relatively long working periods without any feeling of discomfort on the part of the wearer.

My invention is not limited to any of the specific details of construction that are illustrated, since they may be variously modified without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, as set forth in the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. A toe and foot guard comprising an arched metal shell body shaped to fit over the toe and instep of a shoe-encased foot of the wearer, the metal body being Wider than the shoe of the wearer so that its side edge wiil be free to engage the ground, a rubber toe piece secured to the front of the body and embodying a cross piece extending across and underneath the toe of the wearersshoe, and a resilient element for resiliently supporting the shell body above the instep of the wearer and for securing the shell body to the shoe of the wearer.-

2. A toe and foot guard comprising a metal shell to be worn over a shoe of a wearer, and means for supporting the guardon the shoe with a resilient engagement between the guard and the'shoe above the arch of the foot, and with fixed engagement at the toe of the shoe.

. 3. A toe and foot guard comprising a shell shaped to fit over the toe and instep of a shoeencased foot of a wearer, means on the front end of the shell for holding-the forward end of the shell in relatively fixed position against upward or downward movement at the toe of the shoe, and means at the back end of the shell for limiting its upward movement but permitting limited downward movement.

4. A toe and foot guard comprising a shell shaped to fit over the toe and instep of a shoeencased foot of a wearer, means on the front end of the shell for holding the forward end of the shell in relatively fixed position at the toe of the shoe, and a floating support at the back end of the shell for fioatingly supporting the shell on the shoe of the wearer said support consisting of a flexible cross strap fitting over the top of the shoe and supported within the shell and between the two side walls.

5. A toe and foot guard comprising a shell shaped to fit over the toe and instep of a shoeencased foot of a wearer, means on the front end of the shell for holding the forward end of the shell in relatively fixed position at the toe of the shoe, and self-adjusting saddle means supporting the shell on the top of the shoe said saddle means consisting of a strap supported within, and between the side walls of the shell and disposed to rest upon the top of the shoe.

6. A toe and foot guard comprising a shell shaped to fit over the toe and instep of a shoeencased foot of a wearer, means on the front end of the shell for holding the forward end of the shell in relatively fixed position at the toe of the shoe, and resilient means including a self-adjusting strap within the shell to support the shell on the shoe.

7. A toe and foot guard comprising a shell shaped to fit over the toe and instep of a shoeencased foot of a wearer, means on the front end of the shell for holding the forward end of the shell in relatively fixed position at the toe of the shoe, a crossed strap within the shell to support the shell on the shoe. the two ends of the strap extending out of the shell, and a resilient element connected between the two ends of the strap to serve as a loop to encircle the heel of the shoe and hold the shell on the shoe.

8. A toe and foot guard comprising a rigid self-sustaining shell shaped to fit loosely over the toe and instep of a shoe-encased foot of a wearer, means on the front end of the shell for holding the forward end of the shell in relatively fixed position at the toe of the shoe, and means at the back end of the shell for securing the shell to the shoe and for permitting a limited amount of selfadjusting movement of the shell about its front fixed end as a center, to hold the shell loosely above and about the shoe, said securing means including a resilient band secured to the shell on opposite sides of the shell and of sufiicient length to permit itself to be positioned frictionally around the heel of the shoe to hold the shell on the shoe of the wearer, while permitting quick and easy shifting of the band to displace it from effective position to permit the shell to be easily removed.

9. A toe and foot guard comprising a shell shaped to fit over the toe and instep of a shoeencased foot of a wearer, means on the front end of the shell for holding the forward end of the shell in relatively fixed position at the toe of the shoe, and means including a crossed strap within the shell to serve as an inverted saddle to support the shell on the instep of the shoe with a contact that will yield to permit the strap to adjust itself under the force of an external pressure, while being suflijciently tight normally to hold the shell in fixed position on the shoe against relative movement.

10. A toe and foot guard comprising a shell shaped to fit over the toe and instep of a shoeencased foot of a wearer, means on the front end of the shell for holding the forward end of the shell in relatively fixed position at the toe of the shoe, a cross strap extending across the bottom of the shell and connected to the bottom edges of the side walls of the shell to be underneath the shoe of the wearer, and resilient means including an element within the shell and yieldingly conformable to the shoe, above the arch, for floatingly supporting the shell on the shoe, to permit the shell to floatingly oscillate about its fixed position at the toe.

11. A toe and foot guard comprising a shell shaped to fit over the toe and instep of a shoeencased foot of a wearer, means on the front end of the shell for holding the forward end of the shell in relatively fixed position at the toe of the shoe, a cross strap extending across the bottom of the shell and connected to the bottom edges of the side walls of the shell to be underneath the shoe of the wearer, a yielding element within the shell for fioatingly supporting the shell on the shoe, and a resilient element outside of the shell for holding the shell on the shoe.

12. A toe and foot guard comprising a shell shaped to fit over the toe and instep of a shoeencased foot of a wearer, means on the front end of the shell for holding the forward end of the shell in relatively fixed position at the toe of the shoe, a cross strap extending across the bottom of the shell and connected to the bottom edges of the side Walls of the shell to be underneath the shoe of the wearer, a yielding element within the shell for fioatingly supporting the shell on the shoe, and a resilient loop element outside of the shell to serve to hold the shell on the shoe, said resilient element being connected to the yielding element within the shell to hold the yielding element normally tight.

13. A toe and foot guard comprising a shell shaped tofit over the toe and instep of a shoeencased foot of a wearer, means on the front end of the shell for holding the forward end of the shell in relatively fixed position at the toe of the shoe, a strap extending within the shell in cross fashion from two spaced points at the top of the shell to diagonally opposed points near the opposite bottom edges of the shell and extending through the shell at such bottom points, and a resilient element connected between the two ends of the strap extending through such bottom points.

14. A toe and foot guard comprising a shell shaped to fit over the toe and instep of a shoeencased foot of a wearer, means on the'front end of the shell for holding the forward end of the shell in relatively fixed position at. the toe of the shoe, a strap extending within the shell in cross fashion from two spaced points at the top of the shell to diagonally opposed points near the opposite bottom edges of the shell and extending through the shell at such bottom points, and a resilient element connected between the two ends of the strap extending through such bottom m forcing a d bracing cross-strap across the bottom opening of the shell and secured to the lower edges of both side Walls of the shell, a yielding support connected to the shell and located within the shell to fit over the instep of the foot, an elastic heel-strap to hold the shell on the shoe, and freely articulated snap connectors securing the ends of the heel-strap to ends of the yielding support.

HARRY N. WASSER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2881539 *Sep 5, 1957Apr 14, 1959Dysart Charles EFoot guard
US3128565 *Aug 17, 1961Apr 14, 1964Andrew J LidwinHunting boot protector
US4597199 *Feb 6, 1985Jul 1, 1986Steve HongSafety shoe
US6367168 *Jul 26, 2000Apr 9, 2002Nike, Inc.Article of footwear including a tented upper
US6898873May 15, 2003May 31, 2005Nike, Inc.Article of footwear including a thematical toe cover
US7107707May 26, 2005Sep 19, 2006Nike, Inc.Article of footwear including a thematical toe cover
US7178271Dec 14, 2004Feb 20, 2007Columbia Insurance CompanySole with improved construction
US7444768Feb 12, 2004Nov 4, 2008Nike, Inc.Footwear and other systems including a flexible mesh or braided closure system
US7930840 *Mar 11, 2008Apr 26, 2011Bubalo Charles EToe protection apparatus
US8387284 *Jul 2, 2009Mar 5, 2013Asher BaumFootwear, clothing and other apparel with interchangeable toe and heel members or other ornaments and related methods and systems
US20100005686 *Jul 2, 2009Jan 14, 2010Asher BaumFootwear, clothing and other apparel with interchangeable toe and heel members or other ornaments and related methods and systems
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/72.00R
International ClassificationA43C13/00, A43C13/14
Cooperative ClassificationA43C13/14
European ClassificationA43C13/14