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Publication numberUS2160804 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 30, 1939
Filing dateSep 26, 1938
Priority dateSep 26, 1938
Publication numberUS 2160804 A, US 2160804A, US-A-2160804, US2160804 A, US2160804A
InventorsArmentrout Arthur L, Hall Elwin B
Original AssigneeSecurity Engineering Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for repairing well liners, casings, etc.
US 2160804 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 30, 1939- E. B. HALL H m. 2,160,804.

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR REPAIRING WELL LINERS. CASINGS. ETC

Filed Sept. 26, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 m4. E6.

w x H 4/ 55 3 3 v 4" .ZkW/OWJ 35 2a .ZQWJ/VZZ 91;

0/20 flan/m L HIP/115775507 Patented May 30, 1939 METHOD AND arrsna'rus mam wan. amass, CASINGS, ETC.

Elwin a. Ball and Arthur L. Armentrout, Loa A..- gelcs, Calm, assignors, by direct and mesne assignment to Secnrimngineering Co. Inc., a

corporation of Calif Application September 26, 1938, Serial No. 231,724

17 Claims.

This invention relates to well drilling and producing and relates more particularly to a method and apparatus for repairing well liners, well casing, and the like. A general object of the invention is to provide an efllcient method and a simple, practical and veryeffective apparatus for repairing or closing openings in well liners, well casings, etc. b

The liners installed in the producing portions of wells sometimes develop holes that admit sand and other solid matter to the well in excessive quantities to interfere with the production.

- These holes have various origins, for example,

they may be causedby a corrosive or abrasive ac- 1 tion or by the operation of certain tools or equipment in the well. Similar holes are found in well casings and quite frequently are the points of entrance of unwanted fluid to the wells.

Another object of the invention is to provide go a method for repairing a leak in a well liner or casing that assures the complete sealing off of the leak.

Another object of the invention is tov provide a method for repairing well casing, well liners, I etc., that permits the well casing or liner to be cleared for drilling operations, or the like.

Another object of this invention is to provide a repair liner that may be readily installed in a well to repair or close off an opening in a well liner, or the well casing.

Another object of this invention is to provide repairing equipment of the character mentioned that may be easily and quickly set in the operative condition in the well without disturbing the liner or the well casing.

Another object of this invention is to provide 'a device or repair liner of the character mentioned that does not interfere with the productionof the well or with the operation of the well pump 40 or the other well equipment.

Another object ofthis invention is to provide a repair liner of the character mentionedthat is drillable to be quickly and easily removed from the well by drilling it up with drilling tools. The

46 repair tool ordevice of the invention may be easily disposed of or removed, when such a course becomes desirable or necessary, by merely operating a suitable drilling tool in the well to drill the-device up and reduce it to small cuttings or 50 fragments and flushing the cuttings from the well.

Another object of this invention is to provide a drillable repair section or liner of the character mentioned that forms dependable fluid-tight seals with the interior of the liner or casing at as points above and below the opening or hole in the liner or casing to insure a secure, .positi ve shut off.

tion will be fully understood from the following detailed description of typical preferred manners I of carrying out the method and typical forms and applications of the apparatus, throughout which description reference is made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of one form of the invention arranged in position in a well liner showing the parts in the normal or unactuated positions'with the liner in vertical cross section. Fig. 2 is an enlarged longitudinal detailed sectional view of the upper portion of the tool with the packer actuated showing the body and a portion" of the setting string in elevation. Fig. 3 is an enlarged longitudinal detailed sectional view of the lower portion of the tool with the packer set, showing the lower tail-piece and the body in elevation. Fig. 4 is a side elevation of another form of the invention in a well liner with the lower packer actuated. Fig. 5 is an enlarged longitudinal detailed sectional view of the upper portion of the tool shown in Fig. 4 illustrating the manner in which the upper packer is actuated, and Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 5 showing the upper packer actuated.

The equipment or apparatus of the present invention may be embodied in forms for repairing the different tubular structures and members employed in deep wells, such as oil wells and gas.

wells. In the following detailed description we will describe two typical preferred forms of apparatus of the invention employed in accordance with the method of the invention to repair typical well liners. It is,to be understood that the invention is not to be construed as limited or restricted to the particular forms or applications about to be described, but is to be taken as including any The various objects and features of our inven- I features or modifications that may fall within the scope of the claims.

The repair device or apparatus of the invention illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 comprises, generally, a drillable tubular body l0, drillable packing means A and B carried by the upper and lower portions of the body It to seal with. the interior of a well liner L, and means ii for lowering and setting the tool.

The body II of the repair tool or device is an elongate tubular member or structure adapted to be introduced into the liner L. The, body I0 is proportioned to readily pass through the liner L and may be of substantial'length to extend beyond the upper and lower ends of the hole H in made up of three lengths or sections l2, l3 andl4 of tubular stock or pipe. The body sections l2, l3 and I4 may be connected by suitable couplings l5. The body I0 is preferably provided at its lower end with a guide Hi to facilitate the passage of the tool into the liner L. In accordance with the invention the body I0 is drillable, that is, it is formed of va material that may be 'drilled up or reduced to cuttings or fragments by a suitable drilling tool operated in the well. In practice the body l0 may be formed of aluminum, aluminum alloy, cement, glass, suitable plastic materials, etc., or combinations of such materials.

The packing means A and B are provided on the upper and lower portions, respectively, of the g body I to seal with the interior of the liner L above and below the hole H. The packing means A and B are such that they may be operated by manipulation of the body I0 when the tool is in the well. The vertically spaced packing means A and B may besimilar or identical in construction and we have designated corresponding parts of the means A and B with corresponding reference numerals. Where the body l0 comprises the three sections,|2, l 3 and M the packing means A is carried on the upper section l2 while the packing means 13 is supported on the lower body section I4.

Each packing means A and B includes one or more rings ll of packing material surrounding or encircling the'body Hi. In the case illustrated each packing means A and B includes two packing rings separated by a spacer l8. The ends of the spacers l8 are outwardly convergent and the ends of the rings l1 areshaped to conform to the endsof the spacers. The uppermost packing ring H of each means A and B engages against a fixed abutment on the body H). In the typical construction illustrated in the drawings the uppermost ring ll of the means A bears against the lower end of an adapter or reducing nipple l9 threaded on the upper end of the section l2. The engaging ends of the nipple l9 and the said packing ring |1 slope upwardly and outwardly. The

uppermost packing ring I1 of the means B may engage against the lower end of an adapter 2t interposed between the body sections |3 and it. The adapter 20 may be threaded on the upper end of the section M and may be connected with the section l3 by a coupling IS. The engaging ends of the adapter 20 and the uppermost packing ring ll of the means B preferably slope upwardly and outwardly. The rings l1 are con-'- structed of a suitable deformable and compressible packing material capable of withstanding the fluids in the well. In practice the rings l'l may be formed of lead. The spacers I8, the.

nipple l9 and the adapter 2 are all constructed of a drillable material or of drillable materials such as aluminum, aluminum alloy, Bakelite, or

have conical or downwardly and inwardly tapering external surfaces. Sets of slips 22 are engaged on the sleves 2| to be actuated thereby. The outer sides of the slips 22 are toothed to efiectively grip the interior of the liner L for the purpose of resisting or preventing downward movement of the sleeves 2|. with the slips 22 and extend downwardly therefrom. The lower ends of the reins '23 are secured to shiftable rings 24 surrounding the body It. Shiftable rings 25 encircle the body I0 below the rings 24 and outwardly bowed leaf springs 26 extend between and connect the adjacent spaced rings 24 and 25. The springs 26 are adapted to frictionally engage the interior of the liner L to resist movement of the associated slips 22. Latch means are provided for initially or normally holds. ing the slips 22 in their down and retracted positions. These-latch means may comprise pairs of diametrically opposite hook-like latches 21 depending from the rings 24. The latches 21 are adapted to engage pins 23 on the body In to releasably latch the slips 22 in their down and retracted positions. The latches 21 may be such that they are released from the pins 28 by a partial rotation of the body H! in a left-hand direction, followed by a downward movement of the body.

The sleeves 2|, the slips 22, the reins 23, the

" rings 24 and 25, and the latches 21 are constructed When the latches 21 are engaged with the pins 28 the slips 22 are retracted to readily enter the liner L with clearance and the packing rings H are substantially flush with the spacers 8, the

reducer l9 and the adapter 20 to have clearance with the interior of the liner.

The means H is provided to lower the tool into the selected position in the liner L and to set or actuate the tool so that its packing means A and B seal with the liner above and below the hole H. The means includes a tubular member or adapter 30 on the upper end of the body Hi and a. mandrel 3| secured to the lower end of a setting string 32. In the typical construction illustrated the adapter 30 is threaded on the reduced upper portion of the reducer Is. In acordance with the invention the adapter 30 is drillable being formed of aluminum, aluminum alloy, a suitable plastic material, or the like. The adapter 30 is preferably of substantially the same inside diameter as the reducer l9 and the body I0. Two diametrically opposite internal grooves are provided in the adapter 30. Each of these grooves has a vertical entrance 33 extending downwardly from the upper end of the adapter 3|! and terminating at its lower end in a horizontal branch 34. Vertical groove arms 35 extend up and down from the'lower ends of the horizontal branches 34.-

The mandrel 3| is an elongate member adapted to be received in the adapter 30. The mandrel 3| is fixed to the lower end of the setting string 32 which may be in the nature of a string of drill pipe, tubing, or the like. Two diametrically opposite lugs 36 are provided. on the mandrel 3| to cooperate with the grooves in the adapter 30. The lugs 35 are adapted to be passed through the groove entrances 33 and the branches 3% into the groove arms 35. When the lugs 3% are in the ver- Reins 23 are connected tical groove arms ll they serve to connect the tool with the string 32 so that the tool may be run into the well on the string and may be turned by means of the string. 3

p In the method of the invention when employing the toolillustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 of the drawings the position ofthe hole H to be repaired or closed is flrst determined. The tool is secured to the lower end of the string 32 by the means I I described above, and the tool is run into the well on the string. The tool is lowered to a position in the liner L-where its packing means A and B are substantially equally spaced above and below the hole H. The string 32 is then turned and lowered to release the pins 28 from the latches 21. The lugs 36 cooperating with the groove arms 35 transmit these movements from the string 32 to the tool. The springs 26 frictionally engaging the interior of the liner L resist or prevent movement of the rings 24 during the release of the pins 28 from the latches 21. Following the release of the pins 28 from the latches 21 the string 32 is moved downwardly to set the slips 22 and actuate the two packing means A and B. During the downward movement of the body l0 with the string 32 the springs 26 resist or prevent downward movement of the slips .22 so that the cone sleeves 2| move down within the slip assemblies to force the slips outwardly into tight gripping engagement with the interior of the liner L. Thus the slips 2 serve to prevent downward movement of the sleeves 2| and as the downward movement of the body continues the packing rings H are compressed and distorted into sealing engagement with the interior of the ,liner L. It will be apparent how the sleeves 2| form fixed abutments against which the packing rings II are compressed by the reducer l9 and the enlargement 20 fixed on the downwardly moving body II).

It is to be observed that the two packing means .A and B are simultaneously released or conditi'oned for operation and then simultaneously set or actuated. The lugs 3b engage in the bottoms of the lower groove arms 35 to transmit the above described downward movement from the string 32 to the body In.

Following the actuation of the packing means A and B the strfiig 32 is raised slightly and then turned to move the lugs 36 through the horizontal branches 34 of the grooves in the adapter 36. The string 32 is then raised to move the lugs 36 up out of the entrances 33 of the grooves. This disconnects the mandrel 3| and the string 32 from the tool and the string 32 may then be withdrawn from the well. The packing means A and B serve to dependably and eilectively seal between the interior of the liner L and the exterior of the tubular body Ill to prevent fluid or solid matter entering the hole H from reaching the interior of the liner L. It will be observed that there is a large clear passage extending through the repair device from one end to the other that provides for a free flow of fluid and allows tools and equipment to be run into and out of the liner without interference. The packing means A and B are.such that they remain set and efl'ective indefinitely and the device does not require repair or replacement;

When it becomes desirable or necessary to up erate drilling tools'in the well for the purpose of deepening the. well or for other purposes the repair device may be easily and quickly removed from the liner by drilling it up. A suitable drilling tool may be operated in the liner to drill up the repair device or reduce it to small fragments spaced apart by a suitable spacer 43.

or cuttings that are readily washed or circulated from the well by the circulation fluid employed in the rotary method 'of well drilling. As described above, the several-parts of the repair device are constructed of drillable material and the tool may be easily drilled up when in the well. This is necessary to attempt to withdraw the device after it has been in the well for a substantial period as it may be easily and quickly removed by drilling it up.

L. The form of the invention illustrated in Figs. 4, 5and 6 of the drawings may be said to comprise, generally, a body It, spaced packing means A and B on the body It, and means I I for setting and actuating the repair liner or tool. The body Ill may be similar in construction to the body In described above. As illustrated in the drawings, the body l0 comprises an upper section l3 and a lower section l4 connected by a coupling IS. The body sections l3 and H are elongated tubular members and are proportioned to be received in the liner L with suitable clearance. The body Ill is of sufllcient length to extend. some distance above and below the hole H in the liner L when the repair section is in position in the liner. In accordance with the invention the body III is drillable, that is, it is constructed of a drillable material such as aluminum, aluminum alloy, cement, a suitable plastic material. or the like, to be drilled up or reduced to fragments by a drilling tool when in the well.

The lower packing means B is arranged bn the lower section l4 of the body I0 and is operable to seal with the interior of the liner L below the hole H therein. As illustrated in the drawings, the packing means B may be identical with the packing means A and B described above, and the reference numerals applied to the elements of' the packing means B have been used to designate corresponding parts of the packing means -B.

The upper packing means A is arranged at the upper end of the body it and is operable to seal with the interior of the liner Labove the hole H. The means includes an extension or tubular member W attached to the upper end of the body lil In the particular construction illustrated in the drawings the member 40 is secured to the upper end of the body section |3 by means of a threaded coupling 4|.. The member '40 and the coupling 4| are formed of a drillable material, ior example, they may be constructed of the same material as the body sections 13 and H. The member 40 forms the adapter of the setting and actuating means I l as will be more fully described.

The packing means A further includes packing rings 42 on the member 40. The rings 42 encircle or surround the member 40 and are A shiftable follower 44 is arranged on the member 40 to engage down against the upper end of the uppermost ring 42. A pin and slot connection 50 connects the follower 44 with the member 40 for vertical movement thereon. The packing rings 42 are constructed of a deformable packing material such as lead and the spacer 43 and the follower 44 are constructed of drillable material such as aluminum, aluminum alloy, or the like. The lowermost packing ring 42 has its lower end engaged against the upper end of the coupling 4|. The ends of the packing rings 42 are preferably outwardly divergent and the ends of the spacer 43, the follower 44 and the coupling 4| engaging the rings are pitched to conform with the shape of the rings. The packing rings 42 are initially of substantially the samediameter as the collar 4| to readily enter the liner L and the rings are distortable under compression to engage and seal against the interior of the liner L, as shown in Fig. 6.

The means H for setting and actuating the device includes or provides a pair of diametrically opposite grooves in the tubular member 40, de-

scribed above. Each of these grooves includes a vertical entrance 45 extending downwardly from the upper end of the member 40 and a horizontal branch 46 at the lower end of the entrance. Vertical groove arms 41 extend up and down from the branches 45 in spaced parallel relation to the entrances 45. The means |l further includes a mandrel 48 fixed or secured to the lower end of a setting string 32 of drill pipe, tubing, or the like. and is provided at its lower end with an enlargement The enlarged 5| carries diametrically opposite lugs 52 cooperable with the grooves in the interior of the member 40. The lugs 52 are adapted to be passed through the entrances 45 and the branches 46 of the grooves into and out of the vertical arms 41. When the lugs 52 arein the groove arms 47 they serve to connect the repair section with the mandrel 48 and the string The setting and actuating means Il further includes a bell 53 on the mandrel 48 for actuating the packing means A. The mandrel 48 is provided with a long, rather steep, thread 54 and the bell 53 has an internal thread mating with the thread 54. The lower portion --of the bell 53 is enlarged in diameter to pass down over the upper portion of the member 40. The lower end of the bell 53 is fiat and adapted to bear against the upper end of the follower 44. Means is provided on the bell 53 to frictionally engage the interior of the liner L to resist movement of the bell. Circumferentially spaced leaf springs 55 have their upper ends attached to the bell 53. The springs 55 are bowed outwardly to frictionally engage the interior of the line L. The lower portions of the springs 55may be shiftable in vertical grooves 56 in the exterior of the en larged lower portion of the bell 53. The bell 53 is initially on the upper portion of the mandrel 48 to be clear of the member 40 and the packing means A when the tgil is run into the well. When the be1l 53 is threadeddown themandrel 48 it is adapted to extend beyond the lower end of the enlargement 5| to cooperate with the follower 44.

In the method ofemploying the form of the invention illustrated in Figs. 4, 5 and 6 of the drawings the hole H to be closed off is located and the repair liner or device is run into the well on the string 32 to enter the liner L and assume a position where its packing means A and B are spaced above and below the hole H. When the device has been arranged in the proper position the string 32 is turned to disengage the pins 28 from the latches 21 and is then lowered to actuate the slips 22. During downward movement of the body the cone sleeve 2| of the means B forces the slips 22 out into tight engagement with the liner L and the slips operate to hold the sleeve against further downward movement. Continued The mandrel 48 is of substantial length downward movement of the body Ill effects the compression and distortion of the packing rings so that they tightly seal with the interior of the liner L at a point below the hole H; It will be observed that the slips 22 set or actuated as just described serveto support the device in the liner L and to hold. the device against movement.

' Following the actuation of the packing means B the string 32 1s moved upwardly and given a partial turn to move the lugs 52 into the horizontal branches 4B of the grooves in the member 40. The string 32 is then moved upwardly'to withdraw the lugs 52 from the grooves and to move the mandrel 48 to a position where it is spaced above the tool. Thestring 32 is then rotated in a direction tocause the bell 53 to be threaded down the mandrel 48. During this rotation of the string 32 the springs 55 cooperate with the interior of the liner L to resist turning of the bell. The string 32 is rotated until the bell 53 is threaded down to the enlargement 5| on the lower end of the mandrel 48. The string 32 is then lowered to engage the lower end of the bell 53 with the upper end of the follower 44. The string 32 may then be lowered or moved downwardly so 'that the bell 53 exerts a downward force on the follower 44. This downward force on the follower 44 compresses the packing rings 42 and distorts them or expands them to seal with the interior of the liner L. When the packing rings 42 have been actuated or expanded the string 32 is raised and withdrawn from the well. The repair device is then fully set or actuated.

The packing means A and B carried by the imperforate tubular body l0 and sealing with the interior of.the liner L at polnts above and below the hole H prevent the passage of fiuid and solid matter from the hole H into the liner.

The repair device serves to fully and dependably close ofl" the hole H in the liner L. The packing means A and B are such that they remain effective indefinitely. The device has through its a full length an unobstructed opening which closely approximates the diameter of the liner L and which permits passage through the device of pumping and other well equipment and tools of sizes required to properly continue operations in the-well. In the event that it becomes desirable or necessary to deepen the well or to carry on other operations below the repair device, the device may be easily removed from the well by merely drilling it up. A suitable drilling tool may be operated in the well to reduce the repair section of the invention to small cuttings or fragments that are washed from the well by the circulation fluid. The several parts of the repair device are constructed of drillable material and are easily and quickly drilled up by a drilling tool.

While we have described the method and apparatus of the present invention as utilized to seal ofi holes in well liners, it is to be understood that they may be employed in a similar manner to repair or to seal off holes in well casings and other tubular objects installed in wells.

Having described only typical preferred manners of carrying out the method of our invention and typical forms and applications of the apparatus, we do not wish tobe limited or restricted to the specific details herein set forth, but wish to reserve to ourselves any variations or modifications that may appear to those skilled in the art or'fall within the scope of the following 65 assembly of the same may be removed from the into fragments by a drilling ing means.

2. A device for repairing a tubular object in a well comprising a tubular body to be inserted in said object, vertically spaced packing means on the body operable to'pack with the interior of said object, and means for releasably connecting the body to a setting string by which the body may be lowered into said object and the packing means actuated, said body and packing means being constructed of drillable material whereby the device may be drilled up in the well.

3. Apparatus for sealing off an opening in a tubular object in a well comprising a tubular body to be introduced into the object, packing means on the body operable to seal with the interior of the object at points above and below the opening, and a member mounted upon the upper end of the body adapted to be releasably connected to a setting string by which the body may be lowered into the object and the packing means actuated.

4. Apparatus for sealing of! an opening in a tubular object in a well comprising a tubular body to be introduced into the object. packing means on the body operable to seal with the interior of the object at points above and below the opening, and a member mounted upon the upper end of the body adapted tobe'releasably connected to a setting string by which the bo y may be lowered into the object and the packing means actuated,- the body, packing means and said member being formed of drillable material whereby they may be drilled up in the well.

5. Apparatus for sealing ofl an opening in a tubular object in a well comprising a tubular body to be introduced into the object, packing means on the body operable to seal with the interior of the object at points above and below the opening, each packing means including slips for gripping the interior of the object and deformable packing, and a member mounted upon the body adapted to be releasably connected to a setting string by which the body may be installed in the object and the packing means actuated, the body, packing means and member being formed of drillable material whereby they may be drilled up in the well.

6. Apparatus for sealing ofl an opening in a tubular object in a well comprising a tubular body to be introduced into the object,-packing means on the body operable to seal with the interior of the object at points above and below the opening, each packing means including packing deformable under compression and an abutment on the body for the packing, and means at the upper end of the body for releasably' connecting with a setting string. the body and each of. said means being formed oi drillable material whereby the well by drilling it 7. Apparatus for sealing oi! an opening in a tubular .object in a' well comprising -a tubular body to .be introduced into the object, packingmeans on body operable to seal with the interiorof theobject at points above and below the opening, each packing means including an abutment o'nthe body, deformable packing compressible by the abutment to seal with said ob- 'ject, and slips operable to grip thesaid object and hold the. packing against movement whereby I on the body operable to seal .with the interior of the object at points above and below the opening,

each packing means including an abutment on the body, a shiftable cone on the body, slips operable by the cone to grip the interior of the object to hold the cone against movement, and deformable packing on the body between the abutment and cone deformed to seal with the object by movement of the body subsequent to actuation of the slips, and means for moving the body to actuate the packing means.

9. Apparatus for sealing of! an opening in a tubular object in a well comprising atubular body to beintroducedinto the object, packing means on the body operable toseal with the interior of the object at points above and below the opening. each packing means including an abutment on the body, a shiftable cone on. the body, slips operable by the cone to grip the interior of the object to hold the cone against movement, and packing on the body between the abutment and cone deformable to seal with the object by movement of the body subsequent to actuation of the slips, and means for moving the body to actuate the packing means; the body and said means being constructed of drillable material so that they may be drilled up after being installed in the well. 10. The method of closing off an opening in a tubular object in a well comprising inserting a drillable tubular body in the object, the body having packing, actuating the packing to seal with the object, and subsequently drilling up the body, and packing to leave the said object clear. 11. Apparatus for sealing of! an opening in a tubular object in a well comprising a tubular body to be inserted in the object, packing means on the body operable to seal with the interior of the object below the opening, packing means on the bodyoperable b compression to seal with the interior of the o iect, above the opening. means for releasably connecting the body to a setting string, and a threaded member mounted on the setting string adapted to be threaded to a position to compress the last named. packing means. 12. Apparatus for sealing oif an opening in a tubular object in a well comprising a tubular body to be inserted in the object, packing means on the body operable to seal with the. interior of the object below the opening, packing means on the body operable by compression to seal with the interior of the object above the opening, a releasable means for connecting the body to a setting string, a threaded member adapted to be mounted on the setting string, and means'on the 'member for frictionally engaging the object whereby rotation of thesetting string following its release from the body threads the member to a position to compress the packing upon downward movement of the setting string; the body and the packing means being formed of drillable material whereby they may be drilled up by a drilling tool operated inthe well.

13. Apparatus for sealing of! an opening in a tubular object in a well comprising a, tubular body to be inserted in the object packing means on the body operable to sealwith the interior of the object below the opening including slip means for gripping the interior of the object, and packmay be actuated by movement of the body, Packing means on the body compressible to seal with the interior of the body above said opening, a member threaded on the mandrel, and means on the member engaging the object to resist rotation of the member whereby the setting string may be rotated following its release from the body, to thread the member to position to compress the last named pacldng means.

it. The method of repairing a tubular object in awell comprising providing a drillable tubular body having spaced drillable packers, inserting the body and packers in said object actuating the packers to seal with the object, and subsequently drilling up the body and packers to leave the object clear for operations in the well.

15. The method of repairing a leak in a well casing comprising providing a drillable tubular body having vertically means, installing the body in the casing to have the packing means above and below the leak, actuating the packing means to seal with the casing, and subsequently drilling up the body and packing means to leave the casing clear for operations in the well.

16-, The method of shutting ed a hole in a well liner comprising providing a drillable tubularv close off the leak, and subsequently drilling up the body to leave the object clear.

nnwm 'B. HALL. ARTHUR L. ARMENTROUT.

spaced drillable packing

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Classifications
U.S. Classification166/277, 166/191, 166/123
International ClassificationE21B33/12, E21B29/10, E21B29/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B29/10, E21B33/1204
European ClassificationE21B29/10, E21B33/12D