Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2161134 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1939
Filing dateMar 20, 1937
Priority dateMar 20, 1937
Publication numberUS 2161134 A, US 2161134A, US-A-2161134, US2161134 A, US2161134A
InventorsChapman Francis B
Original AssigneeChapman Francis B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Agitator
US 2161134 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June'6, 1939.

F. B. CHAPMAN AGITATOR Filed March 20, 1957 jinn (i513. Chapman.

Patented June 6, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE AGITAT OR Francis B. Chapman, Los Angeles, Calif.

Application March 20, 1937, Serial No. 132,150 9 Claims. (01. 259-59) This invention relates to an agitator and more particularly pertains, to an apparatus for the treatment of ores, either metallic or non-metallic,

in breaking up slimes, and also effecting forced amalgamation.

An object of the invention is to provide an apparatus of the above character in which breaking up and separating the slimes from the heads,

and where desired effecting amalgamation, is aclH 'complished by subjecting the materials under treatment to violent agitation accompanied by terrific impact, so as to break up and separate each globule of the mass under such dynamic force as to effect complete separation of all deleterious and waste matter from the values contained in the mass.

Another object is to provide an agitator which is so constructed that while in operation a continuous stream of material through the agitator 20 may be effected, thus rendering the agitator continuous in its performance during operation thereof.

Another object is to provide an agitator for the purpose set forth which embodies a plurality of tanks mounted for reciprocal movement through which pulp is directed, in continuous flow when desired, during movement of the tanks, in which means are provided for effecting a substantially V uniform distribution of the load throughout the 3iy severa1 tanks; and which also embodies a construction whereby movement of the tanks will be cushioned so as to minimize shock on the driving mechanism.

A further object is to provide a construction in :g's- 'the mounting and assembling of a plurality of tanks whereby individual tanks may be readily removed or replaced in effecting repairs.

With the foregoing objects in view, together with such other objects and advantages as may subsequently appear, the invention is carried into effect as ilustrated by way of example in the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is a view of the agitator as seen in elevation with portions brokenaway;

Fig. 2 is a horizontal section and plan view taken on the line 2--2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a detail in vertical section as seen on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2 showing the manner of forming the interior of an agitator tank with 7 baiiles;

and B indicate a pair of fixed parallel standards erected on a base C and connected together at their upper ends by a rail D.

Mounted on the standards A and B for vertical movement relative thereto is a frame E carrying a series of tanks F. The frame E is here shown as embodying a pair of vertically spaced horizontally extending rails 5 arranged on opposite sides of the standards A and B, with the rails on each side of the standards connected by diagonal brace members 6 and at their ends by guide rods l extending parallel with the standards A and B. p

The rods 1 are slidably mounted'for longitudinal movement in guide bearings 8 and 9 mounted on l the standards A and B. Collars .ID are fixed on the rods 1 between the bearings 8 and 9 and below the upper rail 5 and interposed between the collars l9 and the bearing 9 are coil springs ll tensioned to exert an upward thrust on the 001- lars, l9 and to yieldably resist downward movement of the frame E and the assembly of tanks thereon The tanks F are cylindrical in form and have V dome shaped upper and lower ends l2 and I3 extending in continuation of the cylindrical side walls [4 of the tanks; the lower ends 13 being fitted with nipples l5 on which are screwed caps 56 adapted to be removed to effect drainage of the tanks. 7

Carried on the lower pair of the rails l5 of the frame 'E is a plate H which is formed with a series of circular openings I B of a diameter less than the external diameters of the cylindrical side walls of the tanks and exceeding the diameters of the caps It, the margins of which openings afford seats on which the lower ends l3 of the tanks are supported with the nipples I5 extending downwardly below the lower rail 5.

Mounted on the upper pair of rails 5 is a plate 40 I9 formed with a series of circular openings 29 of a diameter less than the diameters of the tanks and into which openings the domed upper ends 12 of the tanks extend With the margins of the openings bearing there-against. The plates I1 and I9 thus afford spaced supports between which the tanks F are seated. The plates l1 and I9 are demountably affixed to the rails 5 by bolts 2 I; the upper plates l9 being adapted to being removed and replaced in effecting removal and replace- 5 ment of the tanks.

While any suitable number of tanks may be mounted on the frame an odd number of tanks is preferably employed and arranged with the intermediate tank positioned in axial alignment 'whereupon a portion of this pulp flows to the with the vertical center of the frame E and with the flanking tanks spaced equi-distant apart on opposite sides of the central tank. As here shown the apparatus is equipped with seven agitator tanks F but which number may be increased or diminished within limits according to the capacity desired.

The central tank indicated at a is equipped at its upper end with a flexible feed pipe 22 leading from any suitable source of pulp, and leading from diametrically opposed side portions of the central tank a is a pair of nipples 23 which are connected by unions 24 to nipples 25 on the tank b flanking the central tank a; the nipples 23 and 25 affording communications between the central tank a and the flanking tanks 32 at points slightly above the plane of the mid-lengths of the tanks.

Leading from the tanks b on the side portions thereof opposite the nipples 25 and on a plane below the latter are nipples 26 whichconnect through unions 2'! with nipples 28 on the tanks c'flanking the tanks b, and leading from the side portions of the tanks opposite the nipples 28 and on a plane below the latter are nipples 29 which connect through unions 33 with nipples 3| on the end tanks d. It will now be seen that the overflow communications between adjacent tanks leading from the central tank a are offset downwardly relative to each other.

Leading from the lower end portions of the end tanks d are flexible discharge pipes 32 which lead to any suitable point of discharge.

Mounted interiorly' of the cylindrical walls M the tanks are baffles 33 which are formed and arranged as. particularly shown in Fig. 4 and comprise short lengths of metal bars of triangular cross section which are curved to conform to the curvature of the inner face of the wall l4 and are also curved relative to the horizontal to present arcuate inclined faces both upwardly and downwardly, that is, in the direction of travel of the tanks. A series of such battles are arranged in each of the tanks so as to collectively constitute a spiral with adjacent bafiles spaced apart from end to end and with the bafiles in each convolution of the spiral offset relative to the baffles in an adjacent convolution, as indicated in Fig. 3.

The baffles 33 are demountably aflixed to the walls !4 by screws 34 which are engaged with the baffles from the exterior of the tanks as shown in- Fig. 4.

Any suitable means may be employed for effecting reciprocation of the frame E, but is here shown as embodying a driven shaft 35 fitted with ,a crank pin 33 connecting with an upwardly extending pitman 31 pivotally connected to a jack shaft '38 carried by depending hangers 39 aflixed to the lower rail of the frame E. The shaft 35 and its connections are arranged so that the propulsive force thereof will be directed to the central portion of the frame E so that the action will be directed against a substantially balanced load. The shaft 35 may be driven from any suitable source of power and is fitted with a fly wheel 46 as is'common in driving mechanism of this character.

In the operation of the invention pulp is delivered to the central tank a through the pipe 22 fillingthe tank a to the level of the nipples 23 tanks b filling the latter to the level of the-nipples 26 whereupon a portion of the pulp passes to the tanks 0 filling the latter to the level of the nipples 29 through which a portion of the pulp is directed to the end tanks d filling the latter to the level of the discharge pipes 32.

On filling the end tanks at with the pulp to the level of the discharge pipes 32 the pulp may be allowed to flow to discharge freely or may be restricted by closing the pipes 32 in suitable fashion.

Manifestly by closing the discharge pipes 32 the several tanks F of the assembly may be filled with the pulp to any desired level, but for the treatment of the pulp to effect breaking up and separating the slimes from the head, a clearance space is provided above the level of the pulp in each of the several tanks, which is effected by feeding the pulp into the central tank a at a rate corresponding to or less than the discharge capacities of the discharge pipes 32. By so doing the level of the pulp in the several tanks will be determined by the level of their discharge nipples and since the outlet nipples of the tanks 1), c and d flanking the central tank a are disposed on progressively lower levels it follows that the tanks b, c and d will contain successively in the order named, decreased volumes of pulp relative to the volume of pulp contained in the preceding tank from which it receives its supply.

On' thus charging the several tanks with the pulp the frame E is reciprocated vertically by rotatingthe shaft 35 and translatingmovement thereof through the pin 36, pitman 31 and jack shaft 38 intovertical rectilineal movement of the frame E. The length of stroke of the frame E and the speed thereof is varied according to the density of the pulp or ore being treated. A stroke of from 3 up to 6 inches at a speed of from 150 to 300' strokes per minute has been found highly satisfactory in some cases.

It is manifest that by thus reciprocating the frame E. the pulp content of the several tanks F will be subjected to violent agitation and will be caused to impact with considerable force against the baffles 33 in such fashion as to breakup and separate globules in the mass and thus effectively separate the slimes which are carried off in the discharge pipes 32 and delivered to any suitable point of discharge, for further treatment such as in a separator.

By provision of the springs l l reciprocal movement of the frame E is cushioned so as to relieve the driving mechanism of shock on down stroke of the frame.

In event it is desired to effect forced amalgamation a suitable quantity of mercury is placed in the several tanks which by reason of the violent agitation afforded by reciprocating the tanks will cause thorough dispersion of the mercury throughout the pulp so as to insure a maximum of amalgamation.

When it is desired to drain or clean out the tanks the shafts l6 are removed to permit discharge of the contents of the tanks from the lower end thereof and also permit flushing of the tank if so desired.

I claim:

1. In an agitator, a vertically reciprocal frame, means for reciprocating said frame, a plurality of vertically elongated tanks carried by said frame having closed upper ends, means for directing pulp or materials to be treated to one of said tanks, overflow means for directing pulp successively through a series of said tanks to one of said tanks which is formed with a discharge outlet; said overflow means being located intermediate the ends of said tanks.

2. In an agitator, a vertically reciprocal frame,

guide means therefor, means for reciprocating said frame, a plurality of vertically elongated tanks carried by said frame having closed upper ends, overflow connections between adjacent of said tanks intermediate the ends thereof for determining the level of liquid in said tanks in spaced relation to the upper ends thereof, means for delivering materials to be treated to one of said tanks, and means for discharging material from one of said tanks remote from the last named tank.

3. In an agitator, a vertically reciprocal frame, guide means therefor, means for reciprocating said frame, a plurality of verticallyelongated tanks carried by said frame having closed upper ends including a central tank and tanks flanking said central tank, said tanks being provided with comv munications interconnecting adjacent tanks intermediate the ends thereof for determining the level of liquid in said tanks in spaced relation to the upper ends thereof, and means, for cushioning movement of said frame.

4. In an agitator, a plurality of vertically elongated tanks having closed upper ends, means interconnecting the interiors of adjacent tanks intermediate the ends thereof arranged to form a space in the upper end portion of each of said tanks, superimposed baffies mounted on the interior walls of said tanks with certain of said bafiles arranged in said space, a supporting frame for said tanks, means for vertically reciprocating said frame, means for delivering materials to be treated to one of said tanks, and means for discharging treated material from other of said tanks.

5. In an agitator, a plurality of vertically elongated tanks having closed upper ends, means interconnecting the interiors of adjacent tanks intermediate the ends thereof arranged to form a space in the upper end portions of each of said tanks, superimposed bafiles mounted on the interior walls of said tanks, a supporting frame for said tanks, means for vertically reciprocating said frame, means for delivering materials to be treated to one of said tanks, means for discharging treated material from other of said tanks, and means for cushioning reciprocal movement of said tanks.

6. In an agitator, a frame mounted for vertical reciprocal movement, a plurality of vertically elongated tanks carried by said frame including a central tank and a series of tanks arranged in a row on opposite sides of the central tank, said tanks being closed at their upper ends and having overflow communications interconnecting adjacent tanks intermediate the ends thereof, the communication connecting the flanking tanks being disposed on a plane lower than the planes of communication of the central tank therewith, means for feeding materials to be treated to the central tank, and means for discharging the treated materials from the end tanks.

7. In an agitator, a cylindrical tank having its upper and lower ends closed by domed end walls, a supporting frame on which said tank is mounted with its axis extending vertically, a plurality of superimposed bailies interiorly of said tank, means for delivering material to be treated to said tank, means for discharging the materials from said tank on a plane lower than that at which the materials are delivered to the tank to determine the level of liquid in the tank and afford a space below the upper end wall thereof, and means for vertically reciprocating said supporting frame.

8. In an agitator, a cylindrical tank having its upper and lower ends closed by domed end walls, a supporting frame on which said tank is mounted with its axis extending vertically, a plurality of superimposed baffies interiorly of said tank, means for delivering material to be treated to said tank, means for discharging the materials from said tank on a plane lower than that at which the materials are delivered to the tank to determine the level of liquid in the tank and afford a space below the upper end wall thereof, means for vertically reciprocating said supporting frame, and means for cushioning movement of said frame.

9. In an agitator, a vertically elongated tank having its upper end closed and having a drain outlet in its lower end, a closure for said outlet, a supporting frame on which said tank is mounted with its axis extending vertically, a plurality of superimposed bailles interiorly of said tank, means for delivering material to be treated to said tank, means for discharging the materials from said tank on a plane lower than that at which the materials are delivered to the tank to determine the level of liquid in the tank and afford a space below the upper end wall thereof, and means for vertically reciprocating said supporting frame.

FRANCIS B. CHAPMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3255999 *Jul 6, 1964Jun 14, 1966David WestonApparatus for the treatment of pulps
US6579002 *Nov 21, 2000Jun 17, 2003Qbiogene, Inc.Broad-range large-load fast-oscillating high-performance reciprocating programmable laboratory shaker
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/111