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Publication numberUS2161292 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1939
Filing dateDec 4, 1935
Priority dateDec 6, 1934
Publication numberUS 2161292 A, US 2161292A, US-A-2161292, US2161292 A, US2161292A
InventorsHahnemann Walter Max
Original AssigneeLorenz C Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Radiating device
US 2161292 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 6, 1939. w HAHNEMANN 2,161,292

RADIATING DEVICE Filed Dec. 4, 1935 lnyenforx- Walter flax h'a/mema/m Altar/reg Patented June 6, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE RADIATING DEVICE Walter Max Hahnemann,

Berlin-Maricnfelde,

Germany, assignor to C. Lorenz Aktiengesellschait,

Berlin-Tempelhof,

Lorenzweg, Germany, a company of Germany '7 Claims.

The subject of the invention is a device for transmitting an electromagnetic radiation to a body or substance in order to subject this to the influence oi the transmitted energy. The device is especially intended to serve medical purposes, although it will be advantageous also when employed for other purposes, such as the chemical treatment of certain substances.

With the customary methods of this kind a radiation field is produced in air by means of a radiator or oscillator, the air thus being employed as a transmitting medium. In the case of very short waves, however, reflection phenomena occur which cause the useful effect of the transmission, i. e. the effect within the body or substance to be treated, to be very small, only a trifling percentage of the transmitted energy being received by the body or the like. This is due to the fact that in air the radiation will propagate at a velocity other than in the body or substance under treatment.

The invention therefore proposes to employ a radiation field whose transmission properties are similar to those of the object to be treated by means of the radiation.

The invention will be understood from the following description and be particularly pointed out in the appended claims, reference being had to the accompanying drawing, which is a diagrammatic sectional view of a device embodying the invention by way of example.

The device here shown, may serve for instance medical purposes, that is to say, may serve as a means for treating a human or animal body K.

For transmitting the radiation a suitably shaped member C, preferably of a ceramic material, is employed. In the member C a dipole D is disposed, which is connected by an energy line E to an oscillation generator G. A denotes a condenser for shortening the dipole. This arrangement may be accomplished by embedding the parts D, A when manufacturing the member C, or by forming this member with an excavation having the shape of the structure D, A, and then filling this excavation with metal or providing it with a metal coating.

The body K for instance consisting to a large extent of water, insulating materials whose dielectric constant is in the order of magnitude of that of the body to be treated are easy to find out among the insulating materials of high dielectric constant nowadays available. Any other suitable insulating material may of course be used, such as a non-ceramic material. The shape of the member C should be such that the energy will be transmitted without having to pass through air.

Devices of this construction may be provided with means for energy concentration and screening, such means being well known per se. For instance, member C, shaped accordingly, may be fitted with a metal coating R that shall effect an energy concentration by acting as a reflector. This coating may in a well known manner be applied to the ceramic member C by melting so as to provide for an intimate contact between the two and create a handy structure in this way.

What is claimed is:

1. A device for transmitting electromagnetic radiation to bodies or substances comprising an oscillation generator, a dipole from which the radiation is emitted connected to the said generator, and a dielectric filling the space between the body or substance and the dipole, the transmission properties of this dielectric being different from those of air and similar to those of the said body or substance receiving the radiation.

2. A device according to claim 1, wherein the dielectric is of a ceramic material.

3. In a device according to claim 1, a ceramic member forming the dielectric, and means for causing the oscillations to become effective within this ceramic member.

4. In a device according to claim 1, a ceramic member forming the dielectric, a dipole within this member and an energy line interconnecting this dipole and the oscillation generator.

5. In a device according to claim 1, means for causing the oscillations to become effective within the dielectric, and reflecting means, fitted to the dielectric, for concentrating the energy to be transmitted.

6. In a device according to claim 1, a ceramic member forming the dielectric, means for causing the oscillations to become effective within this member, and reflecting means, attached to the surface of the ceramic member, for concentrating the energy to be transmitted.

'7. A device for transmitting electromagnetic radiation to a body or substance comprising means for radiating oscillatory energy and a dielectric filling the space between said body or substance and said means, the transmission properties of said dielectric being different from those of air and similar to those of the said body or substance.

WALTER MAX HAHNEMANN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2425716 *Jul 24, 1937Aug 19, 1947Research CorpElectromagnetic horn
US2433924 *Aug 1, 1945Jan 6, 1948Riblet Henry JAntenna
US2463569 *Nov 17, 1943Mar 8, 1949Raytheon Mfg CoApparatus for treating gaseous media
US2552162 *Jan 19, 1946May 8, 1951Gen ElectricCable terminating device
US2636113 *Mar 9, 1946Apr 21, 1953Standard Telephones Cables LtdFixed route vehicular location and communicating system
US2648002 *Nov 19, 1945Aug 4, 1953Us NavyDielectric antenna
US2761117 *Jan 16, 1952Aug 28, 1956Green Charles EDirectional transducer
US2814298 *Nov 18, 1953Nov 26, 1957Raytheon Mfg CoImpedance matching pad for microwave heating and method of use
US3077195 *May 14, 1959Feb 12, 1963Folsche TrutzRadiation device particularly for medical purposes
US4323056 *May 19, 1980Apr 6, 1982Corning Glass WorksRadio frequency induced hyperthermia for tumor therapy
US6033531 *Jun 17, 1998Mar 7, 2000Berkshire Laboratories, Inc.Spectral catalysts
US7482072Jul 9, 2003Jan 27, 2009Grintellectual Reserve, LlcOptimizing reactions in fuel cells and electrochemical reactions
US8262868Sep 11, 2001Sep 11, 2012Gr Intellectual Reserve, LlcSpectral chemistry
US20020031814 *Aug 1, 2001Mar 14, 2002Brooks Juliana H.J.Spectral catalysts
US20040089532 *Sep 11, 2001May 13, 2004Brooks Juliana H JSpectral chemistry
US20040151957 *Jul 9, 2003Aug 5, 2004Brooks Juliana H. J.Optimizing reactions in fuel cells and electrochemical reactions
Classifications
U.S. Classification607/156, 343/873, 600/13, 219/764, 204/157.15, 343/904, 343/755
International ClassificationA61N5/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61N5/04
European ClassificationA61N5/04