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Publication numberUS2161546 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1939
Filing dateMay 12, 1936
Priority dateMay 12, 1936
Publication numberUS 2161546 A, US 2161546A, US-A-2161546, US2161546 A, US2161546A
InventorsHonig Frank
Original AssigneeHonig Frank
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for winding balls
US 2161546 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 6, 1939. F ome I 2,161,546

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR WINDING BALLS Filed May 12, 1936 3 Sheets-Sheet l N Q 22 v lNVENTOR 44 33 fkflA/lr/foAl/e Lu vw wnmm- H fl- ATTORNEY? June 6, 1939.

F. HONIG METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR WINDING BALLS Filed May 12, 1936 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 BY wfi nur dhmmvlsw ATTORNEY F. HONIG June 6, 1939.

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR WINDING BALLS Filed May 12, 1936 3 Sheets-sheaf 3 BY ,V n I 1- $2 ATTORNEY Patented June 6, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Frank Honig, Pawtucket, R. 1.

Application May 12, 1936, Serial No. 79,251

19 Claims.

v This invention relates to the art of winding strands on cores of spherical or similar shape to make articles such as base balls, golf balls and the like, and has for an object the provision of improvements in this art. The present application constitutes a continuation in part of my application Serial Number 47,732, filed November l, 1935, Patent No. 2,138,452. The present specification is directed to the method of and apparatus for winding spherical forms.

The invention comprehends improved process and apparatus for winding under tension some filamentary material such as cotton, silk, rubber, wire and the like of any desired cross section such as round, square, fiat oval or other shape, on a starting core of any suitable material and form.

Some of the more specific objects of the inventions are: to provide a very simple process and apparatus which are fundamentally correct in principle for winding spherical objects; to provide mechanism which will wind a plurality of balls simultaneously; to provide for winding either hard or soft coverings on a core without damaging, by chafing or otherwise, the filament being wound; to provide for winding upon either a hard or a soft core; to wind without interruption, either due to broken filaments or for changing balls; and to provide other advantages and -features of novelty which will be apparent as the description of the specific embodiments of the invention proceeds.

For convenience of description we may refer to the sphere being wound as if it were the earth. At a given moment the circle of rolling will be called the polar circle; the circle at right angles to the polar circle and passing through the drive point of the sphere at the same given moment will be called the equatorial circle; and the poles will be located where the axis perpendicular to the equatorial plane intersects the polar circle.

According to the present invention a single driving member serves to produce the winding motion to the core to be wound into a sphere. To this single driving member there is imparted a single directional motion in such form as would result from three separate simultaneous circular motions superimposed one over another, namely a circular motion represented by a circle passing through the poles of a sphere, a second circular motion represented by a circle coinciding with the equator of the sphere, and a third circular motion represented by a comparatively small circle having its center at one of the points where the polar circle crosses the equatorial circle.

These circular motions are so combined into one resultant motion as to produce a constantly shifting speed relationship between the several circular motions. For example, the speed along the polar circle is constantly changed, decreased or increased; the equatorial circle is turned about the poles so that it will take the position formerly occupied by the polar circle and vice versa. The third circular motion is a motion similar to that described by the true poles of the earth rotating about the magnetic poles.

That is to say, if the normal axes or centers of each separate circulatory motion are considered with relation to each other, then these centers or axes are continuously moved about in relation to each other to produce an ever changing relationship between the several circular movements. (In contradistinction to the prior art, in which such relationship as may be present, remains constant and fixed, and their motions intermittent and terminating.) In the following description and illustration there will be shown and explained several ways in which this combination of circulatory motions and their constant change of relationship may be accomplished.

The relationship of these separate circular motions, as illustrated in the figures, is shown as such that for eachrevolution of the polar circle the equator is rotated approximately 30 degrees. The third or distributing circular motion is completed once for each 30 degrees turn in the equator, or once for each revolution of the polar circle plus the gain factor, at a predetermined size of the sphere. The relationship of these separate circular motions is further changed by the fact that as the winding progresses the ball increases in size; however, the linear speed of the winding filament or the peripheral speed of the ball remains constant during the winding operation.

The invention may be embodied in many different forms, all of which essentially comprise 'a single driving member to which a resultant single directional motion is imparted by the constantly changing interrelationship of three separate circular motions. For example, the resultant single directional motion may be produced on the face of a disc, or on the periphery of a cylinder, cone or sphere, any of which may having a circular or other cross-sectional shape.

However, the invention is not in any way restricted to the use of the devices to be described for the illustration of the invention, in fact, the invention may be practiced with the core to be wound resting on top of a table and the palm of the operators hand moved about in the several and continuous circulatory motions above described. In this way, when the description of the invention is closely followed, and with some practice, very excellent results may be obtained. However, naturally, it is preferred to embody the invention in some mechanical device to obtain consistently uniform results. In

the following description and illustration a preferred and an alternate mechanical embodiment will be shown and explained.

The mechanical embodiments of the invention which appear best adapted for practical operation are the forms in which the single driving member has a circular cross-sectional shape. Some of these are well suited to perform a variety of winding for universal production demand with rapid adjustment to suit variable demand, while others are better suited for large production demand of some more fixed winding or pattern characteristics in which the variation is more limited in degree.

To provide a clear understanding of the scope of this invention, two embodiments of the invention are illustrated, one embodiment illustrating a disc-shaped driving member which may be classified as the planetary eccentric type of embodiment, and another embodiment illustrating a fragmental sphere-shaped driving member which may be classified as the planetary cone type of embodiment. Each of these embodiments contain the invention adapted to suit some specific demand and are not to be construed as departures from the invention.

The planetary eccentric type of mechanical embodiment may be said to correspond to the practicing of the invention on top of a table with the palm of the hand moving in a plane parallel with the top of the table. while the planetary cone type represents a motion of the palm in a constantly variable plane with relation to the table top surface.

Perhaps it may be clearer to state that the planetary eccentric type represents the invention practiced with the constantly changing relationship of the several circular motions performed with the axis of each circular motion remaining parallel to the axis of every other of the circular motions but moving closer to or further away from each other, while the planetary cone type represents the practice of the invention when the change in the relationship between the several circular motions is made by angular change in the plane of rotation of each circular motion as Well as by the movement of to and from each axis.

That is to say, the relative changes between the several circular motions may be made in any desired manner;as by changing the center of rotation and maintaining the plane of rotation, as shown in Fig. 1;as by changing the plane of rotation while maintaining the center of rotation, not shown;-as by a combination of changing both the center of rotation as well as the plane of rotation, as shown in Fig. ;--or any other desired combination of the motions as will be evident to those experienced in this art, provided, of course, that all the motions are performed with a single member in contact with the the core to be Wound.

The mechanical embodiment of the invention which appears best to perform a variety of winding operations for universal production demand, comprises a disc-shaped driving member. For this reason a disc type apparatus has been selected, as one, to illustrate the principles of the invention herein. This furnishes a clear illustration of the true rolling action which takes place between the disc and the ball being wound, and also furnishes a clear understanding of the motions and their interrelated combination.

The mechanical embodiment of the invention which appears best adapted to perform operations involving more fixed winding characteristics as for large production demand, comprises a circular driving member with a spherical operative face in which the combined circular motions are effected by means of a compound planetary conical rotation as will be explained.

As will be seen from these selected illustrative embodiments, one of the important advantages of this invention is that it permits the employment of very simple apparatus; another is that it provides for the winding of a plurality of balls on the same machine at the same time, which is very economical in floor space and attendants required; another is that the filament or tape is wound on the core in one continuous length, that is, there is no breaking of the filament due to chafing or other causes during the winding operation.

Some illustrative embodiments of the invention will now be described, reference being made to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a vertical section, partly in side elevation, of winding apparatus of the disc type adapted to wind four balls simultaneously;

Fig. 2 is a partial end elevation taken on the line 22 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary section taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1 to show the ball holding mechanism;

Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic view, in the nature of a development, to illustrate the separate circular motions and the single resultant motion and the manner in which the filament is distrib uted on the core;

Fig. 5 is a view partly in vertical cross section on the line 55 of Fig. 6, and partly in side elevation, of apparatus of the spherical cone type adapted to wind sixteen balls simultaneously; and

Fig. 6 is an end elevation, partly in section, and partly fragmental in nature, to clearly show the operation, the view being taken generally on the line 66 of Fig. 5.

Referring first to Fig. 4 for a graphical explanation of the motions involved, the line A represents a fragmental development of a circle rolling in a single direction, as for example a circle on the face of a disc when the disc is rotated about its geometric center. Circle B represents the primary orb in which the secondary or satelite orb represented by the circle C revolves. This will shortly be explained by reference to the disc type embodiment shown in Figs. 1 and 2 where the excenters B and C for the discs 25, by which the cores 32 are driven, are shown. The distances along line A between the crossing of lines i, 2, 3, 4 and 5 represent the developed circumference of a smaller circle rolling along line A. This smaller circle may be a sphere rolling along the face of a disc in a circular path represented by the development of line A, which for clearness of explanation, may be referred to as circle A.

The rotative center, as distinguished from the geometric center, of the circle A is located on the satelite orb C and is carried about in an orbital movement on said circle. The center of orb C is located on the primary orb B and is carried about in an orbital movement on circle B. Thus, the rotative center of circle A is carried about in a compound orbital movement as represented by the orb circle C on the orb circle B. As a result of such compound orbital movement imparted to the rotative center of circle A the development of this circle then will take the form as indicated at line AI, and a smaller circle rolling on line A then will follow the resultant direction Al caused by the movement of the rotative center of circle A in the compound orbital movement of B and C.

As a point on the orb B moves away from a given point for a distance of degrees and moves toward the same point for the next 180 degrees it produces a lead to the right, as shown below the line 3, or to the left, as shown above the line 3. The motion produced by orb B is referred to as the lead, while the motion produced by the orb C is referred to as the distribution. A point on orb C also has a right and left hand lead similar to that of a point on the orb B.

When the lead produced by the orb B and orb C are interposed in the movement illustrated, then the small circle or sphere rolling along the line AI will have a constant gain in its development which is illustrated by the distances along line A between the crossings of lines l-l 22, 4-4, and 55. In this figure the starting point was taken at line 3. Translating the resultant motion AI into a winding motion, the filament wound on a core rolling on the line Ai will take the form of said line.

Referring to the illustrative form of mechanism embodying the invention shown in Figs. 1 to 3, a frame or housing 5 which supports the mechanism has attached thereto circular end plates '1 in which a large shaft 8 is journalled. The shaft 8 is driven through the medium of a gear 9 fast thereon and a pinion it meshing with gear 9 and fast on the main drive shaft ii. The main shaft H is. mounted in bearings in a bracket 12 secured to the top of the main frame 6 and may if desired drive several units like the one herein described. Power may be supplied to the shaft I l at any desired point along its length from any suitable means.

The shaft 8 is held in proper longitudinal position relative to the bearing plates 1 by its gear 9 at one end and by a collar l3 made fast thereto near the other end.

Rotatably mounted on the shaft 8 to one side of the axis thereof is a planet shaft K5, the same being carried by anti-friction bearings i l retained in member 8 by retainer plates E6. The center of shaft 15 describes the orb B referred to in Fig. 4.

Means are provided for driving shaft it as it moves in its orbit. The means shown comprises a pinion ll fast on the shaft mounted within recess I8 in the member 8 and meshing witl'i :3. gear 2| rotatably mounted on a shaft 26 secured in lugs 19 formed on the member 8. The gear 2-l meshes with an internal ring gear 22 made fast within the main frame 5. As the shaft 8 rotates the planet shaft I5 will be rotated through the gears IT and 2| from the ring gear 22.

Means are provided for securing the interrelationship to the other motions of the small circle of motion referred to as the orb circle C in Fig. The means herein shown for accomplishing this comprises the core-driving discs 25 which are ro-tatably mounted at either end of the machine. Each disc bears an inwardly extending driving stud 21, located conveniently close to its geometric center, which engages Within an elongated slot 28 formed in the end of shaft 8. Each disc 25 is provided with an eccentrically disposed circular opening therethrough within which operates an eccentric bushing 23 fast on planet shaft 15. Anti-friction bearings 24 may, if desired, be interposed between the eccentric bushing 23 and the disc 25. Each disc 25 is 'retained on the shaft l5 by a retaining plate 26 secured to the end of the shaft.

Each disc 25 is thus rotated about a point located on the orb C, that is, on the circle described by the center C of the eccentric bushing 23 (Fig. l) which is to one side of the center B of the shaft l5 which lies in the orb B. The disc 25, then, is in reality an eccentric. This would be very easily understood if the rotative speed of disc 25 had been made different from the speed of shaft 3, but, as herein shown, the disc 25 and the shaft'8 have the same rotative speed due to the pin-and-slot connection 21, 28. The present construction is preferred because it obviates an additional train of gears required if the disc 25 is to be driven at a different speed from that of shaft 3, as may be required for some classes of work.

Each eccentric 25 is provided on its working face with some means for securing frictional contact with the core or work piece which it is to drive. The means herein shown comprises an annular ring 29 of a cushioning friction material such as rubber cemented in a groove formed in the disc 25.

Each of the winding discs is adapted to wind two cores. and since the present machine has two discs it is adapted to wind four cores at once. The winding positions are indicated in Fig. 2. The cores or balls. or rather their positions, may be indicated by the numerals 30, 3| and 32.

These are the only ones visible in the drawings but it will be understood that there is a fourth core or position on the left hand disc 25 in Fig. l which lies behind core 30 in that figure, and behind core 32 in Fig. 2, which is not visible in the drawings.

Each of these cores or balls bears against the annular friction track 29 on one of the discs 25 and the winding operation performed on each ball is entirely independent of the Winding operations on the other balls. That is, the winding on each core may be started and stopped and. cores inserted and removed at any winding position at any time without stopping the machine or interfering with the winding of the other cores.

Means are provided for holding the cores pressed against the discs 25. As indicated above, the winding of each core is independent of that of all others, so the holding means for each core will be independent of all others. holding devices for the present machine are identical in construction though two are mounted upside down with respect to the other two due to the difference in direction of travel of the disc at opposite sides. so a description of one will- 'or smaller with relation to the orbs C and B, the

gain as indicated between the lines ll, 2-2, 5- 3 and 55' can be made larger or smaller as desired. As a result, the strands of filament The four on the core will lay closer together or wider apart for each convolution of the core being Wound.

Various forms of core holding mechanisms may be employed. The particular one illustrated in Figs. 1, 2, 3 comprises a slide 34 mounted in guides in the bracket 33 and provided with rotatable core holding discs, an upper pair 35, 35 and a lower pair 36, 36, mounted on supporting shafts set at suitable angles to each other to form. a cup-like pocket to hold the core so it is free to rotate as it is being driven by the disc 25.

The slide 34 is pressed toward the disc 25 by any suitable means, such as a compression spring 31 and may be pulled away from the disc by the operator, a handle 38 being provided on the slide for this purpose.

Means are provided for starting the winding operation for each core and for halting the winding when the ball wound on the core has reached a predetermined size. The means herein shown comprises plates adapted to be interposed between the core and winding disc to break their contact. To this end there are mounted in vertical guides (Figs. 1 and 2) in the bracket 33, a feed or starting slide 44 and a stop slide 43. The stop slide is urged downward to a position between the core and the winding disc 25 by a tension spring 45 attached to lugs on the slide and on the bracket 33, respectively. The stop slide 43 is normally held in outward position by a sliding latch 40 mounted in suitable guides parallel to the slide 34. The latch is tripped when the ball has reached its predetermined size by the engagement of a lug 39 on the slide 34 Which, of course, moves outward as the ball increases in size-with an adjustable set screw 4! provided on the slide latch 40. By the adjustment of screw 4| the size of the ball will be altered, as will be obvious. Feed slide 44 is free to be moved at will in its guides, though it may have a slight binding action to avoid unauthorized movement. It is adapted to be moved between the core and the winding disc 25 when the core is first inserted and while the slide 43 is latched in outer position to prevent the core from being turned immediately. When ready, the slide 44 is pulled downward to allow the core to engage the disc 25. Both the stop slide 43 and the feed slide 44 are provided with handles for manual manipulation in the embodiment shown in Figs. 1 and 2.

Means are provided for feeding to the core the filament to be wound, preferably under tension. Suitable means for this purpose are shown in the drawings and comprise an idler 46 rotatably mounted in a fixed shaft 41 on the bracket 33 near the core position and a tensioning sheave or capstan 49 secured to a rotatable shaft 50 mounted in the other end of the bracket 33. Any desired means may be employed for applying tension to the filament. However, I have found that a magnetic tensioning device seems to produce the most uniform result, so such a device is herein contemplated. For example, a magnetic clutch device of the type illustrated in my Patent No. 1,862,267, granted July 7, 1932, may be employed to act on shaft 50 so as to place tension on the filament 48. It is not illustrated because it does not per se form any part of the present invention.

Whatever may be the kind of tensioning device used, the capstan 49 is retarded in rotation, caused by the pull of the filament originating in the winding action of the core caused by friction with the winding disc 25, to impart the desired tension to the filament.

A pressure or distributing idler 5| is rotatably mounted on a swingable arm 52 pivoted at an axis 53 on the frame 33. The idler serves to hold the convolutions of the filament in gripping engagement on the capstan 49 as well as to distribute the convolutions properly to prevent tangling with the oncoming and off-going filament. The idler may be held against the capstan by gravity or by a spring or other suitable means, not shown. For clearness of illustration the idler is shown separated from the capstan, but in operation it directly engages the capstan.

Means may be provided for heat-shrinking the filament on the core to obtain greater tension therein when this is desired and the filament is of such a nature as to be capable of responding to such treatment. The means herein shown comprises an electric hot plate 54 located as near as convenient to the core being wound and in a position where the filament will pass over or near the heating surface. Any suitable temperature may thus be produced in the filament just prior to its winding on the core and as the hot filament is wound tightly on the core and is then permitted to cool on the core, an additional tension is set up due to shrinkage on cooling. For winding golf balls with a rubber filament a temperature of between F. and 300 F. may be employed. Other temperatures may be employed in keeping with the requirements of the article being produced and the filamentary material being wound thereon. It is found that the additional tension due to heat shrinkage is beneficial because, for example, a golf ball so wound can be driven a considerably greater distance with a given impulse than a ball wound in the usual way.

Referring to the illustrative form of mechanism embodying the invention as shown in Figs. 5 and 6, a frame or housing 6' which supports the mechanism has attached thereto circular end plates l in which a large shaft 8' is journalled. The shaft 8 is driven through the medium of worm gear 9' fast thereon and worm l0 meshing with worm gear 9' fast on shaft II. The shaft H is journalled in the bearing bracket l2 with which the main frame 6 is provided. A V belt pulley 55 is mounted on shaft H through which power may be supplied to the shaft II from any suitable means.

The shaft 8' is held in proper longitudinal position relative to the bearing plates 1' by a flange l3 at one end and flange 56' near the other end to which the worm gear 9 is fastened.

Rotatably mounted on the shaft 3' to one side of the axis thereof are the axially inclined planet shafts IS, the same being carried by anti-friction bearings 14" retained in member 8' by retainer plates It (only one plate is shown). The axis of each planet shaft I5 describes the orb B referred to in Fig. 4.

Means are provided for driving shafts I5 as they move in their respective orbits. The means shown comprise bevel pinions I 1 fast on the shafts l5 and mounted within recesses 18 in the member 8' which mesh with bevel gears 51 rotatably mounted on shaft 20 secured in memher 8. Bevel gears 57!, 51 are made integral with or fast to gear 2| which meshes with the internal ring gear 22 secured within the main frame 3. As the shaft 8 rotates the planet shafts l5, l5 will be rotated through the interaction of gears ll, 51, 2| and 22'.

free to rotate as driven by the core.

mental sphere 25 is provided with a. concentric bore through its geometric; centerwithin which operates the eccentric end portion 23' of the conical planet shaft 15'. Anti-friction bearings 24' may,. if desired, be interposed between; the conical eccentric end portion 23' of the planet shaft l and the core driving member 25. Each fragmental sphere 25' is retained on the shaft I5 by a retaining plate 26' secured to the end of the shaft. Each fragmental sphere 25 is thus rotated about a point located at its geometric center represented by the point where line 3 and line A (Fig. 4) cross, while the axis of member 25' is rotated to describe a cone, the base of which is carried about the conical orb B, respectively by the end 23' of the shaft l5. As will be seen (Fig. 5) the member 25, which drives the core, is rotated about its geometric center as it is carried about through the pin-and-slot connection 2i", 28 and the resultant motion shown in Fig. 4 is imparted by means of the compound conical orbital motion of its axis. The focal point of the orb cone B and the focal point of the orb C are both located at the geometric center of circle A as indicated at F in Fig. 5.

The member 25 in Fig. 1 is rotated about a point away from its geometric center and thus the embodiment shown in Fig. 1 is adapted for greater variation in the pattern of winding on the core due to greater possible variation between the diameter of circle A with relation to orb B and orb C than that shown in Fig. 5 in which the possible variation is not so great.

To provide some variation. in the diameter of circle A in the embodiment shown'in Fig. 5, a layer of suitable strip material indicated at 58' may be wound between member 25- and the annular ring of. friction material 29. Because of the limitation in the dimensional or angular pattern of winding in the embodiment shown in Figs. 5 and 6, this type of embodiment is usually provided with a core holding device which by itself and independently of the pattern incorporated in member 25', is capable of modifying the pattern of winding on the core. Such device and the method of changing the pattern on the core being woundby it is shown in my copending application Serial No. 79,252 filed May 12, 1936, now Patent No. 2,156,896, which also constitutes a continuation in part of my original application above identified.

For clearness of this specification it may be stated that the holding device comprises taper rollers 59', 59 mounted as idlers on the stud 60' as shown in Figs. 5 and 6. These taper idlers are The idler 81 is also free to rotate on its'stud 62 and has freedom forlongitudinal reciprocation on said stud. A pocket is formed between therollers 59',

59 and 65 into which the core is placed and held during the winding operation, as best seen in Fig. 6. These idlers, or rather their studsare fastened into plate 63 which in turn ismounted on parallel-motion arms 64, 64'. one of which is provided with a cavity '65: into which fits compression spring-I 31'.v The armsare supported on lug 66' forming a part of housing 6' and the assembly may be manually operated by means of a handle 38' as will be clear from'the illustration.

The bracket 33 is secured to main frame 6' by means of segmental spacers 61'. There are eight of these spacers for each member 25' or sixteen for the machine, one for each core position.

The bracket 33 is shown. as a circular plate, one for each member 25, and on these plates are carried the supply spools of filament and some other cognate parts as will be described.

In the spacer members 61' are mounted the feed or starting slide 44' and the stop slide 43'. These are curved to conform to the face curvature of member 25'. The stop slide is operated by the spring 45" as has been described with reference toFigs. 1 and 2-. In Figs. 5 and 6 only the starting slide is shown equipped with a handle 68' for'manual manipulation. The slide latch 40 is mounted in an upstanding guide 41a formed on member 61 and is provided with athreaded portion 4 I and adjustable lock nuts Mb. The latch is urged into engaging position by a spring Me. The stop lug 39 is mounted on the idler plate 63' so as to swing about a' stud 69' and is provided with a side-opening slot Ill. It may be moved in or out of operative position as will be clear from the illustration.

A magnetic tension device is mounted on a bracket H secured to bracket 33'. Only one of the tension devices is shown. It comprises a magnetic member 12' which is movable and a coil member 13' which is fixed to bracket H. The member 12 is mounted on a shaft 50 journaled in bracket 1 l and may be adjusted lengthwise by tension adjusting nut 14. By this means the gap between members 12 and 13' may be increased or decreased to produce less or greater tension in the filament. A capstan 49' is fast on the outer end of shaft 50 as will be clear from the illustration. Distributing idlers 15 are r'riounted' rotatably on studs 16 in the bracket The supply spools of filament are designated as H, there being one for each ball position. The shafts of these spoolsare mounted in'suitable bearings 18' on bracket 33'. Each spool is provided with suitable back tension lever 19 pivoted at 89. These levers are provided with spaced brake arms 19a riding on the flanges of the spool and with an arm 19b acted upon by aspring 190. These tension levers are adapted to regulate the back tension in the filament, that is, the tension before the filament enters the magnetic tension device. The arm 19?) is provided with a filament guide sheave 19d. In Fig. 6 the ball positions are indicated at BI, 82, 83 84-, 85, 86', 81 and 88'. These are shown on theright hand side of Fig. 5 and there is a duplicateset of ball positions on the left hand side of the machine. As shown, this embodiment will wind sixteen balls simultaneously. Some of the balls are shown smaller'than others to indicate incomplete winding, whileothers are shown in finished size.

In operation, referring to the embodiment shown in Figs. 1 and 2, a filament is taken from a source of supply, not shown, and given one or more. turns in aclockwise direction about the capstan '49; then one or more turns in counterclockwise direction about the idler 5i and again a partial turn about the capstan 49 in clockwise direction; It is'then conducted over the guiding sheave 46 and the free end is given a few turns by hand about the core. Assuming the stop slide 43 to be latched in its outer position, the feed slide 44 is moved up into a position between the disc 25 and the core holding discs 35, 36. The slide 34 is moved outward to make space for the core, the core inserted, and the slide 34 released to grip the core between the holding discs 35, 36 and the slide 44. Any slack in the filament is taken up by back-winding the filament to the source of supply. Assuming the driving disc 25 to be in continuous operation, the slide 44 is pulled down when ready to permit the core to be engaged with the face of the disc 25 so that winding begins.

When the desired size has been reached the lug 39 on the slide 34 engages the set screw 4| on the slide latch 40 and withdraws the latch, whereupon the stop slide 43 being released moves down through the action of spring 45 and separates the ball wound on the core from the driving disc 25. The operator then removes the ball, resets the stop slide 43 and introduces a new core in the manner described above.

If it is desired to Wind the filament with closer spacing the bracket33 may be set closer to the geometric center of the disc 25; and if a more open spacing is desired it is moved in the opposite direction. Thus any desired winding may be produced within the capacity of the device.

In operation, referring to Figs. and 6, a filament is taken from one of the spools T! and conducted over the sheave 18d and partially over the capstan 49, then over one of the idlers 15'. It is then conducted over the guiding sheave 46 and the free end is given a few turns by hand about the core. From there on the opera tion of both illustrations or embodiments are practically the same as will be evident from the drawings and the description of operation with reference to Figs. 1 and 2.

In view of the fact that the method of winding spherical forms shown in the embodiments illustrated in the several figures presents a wide departure from the prior art, it may be explained that the circular motions represented by the circle A, orb B and orb C, in Fig. 4, are circular motions which are efiected continuously, without interruption, reciprocation, or other termination in the several circular motions during the winding of a core or cores.

Each of these circular motions are separate and independent of each other. In contradistinction to the prior art, in this invention the single driving member which drives the several cores is moved in the separate circular motions, while the core being wound, as it is driven by the single driving member, is moved in a spherical curve resulting from the intercombination of the several circular motions. The resultant spherical curve, as shown in Fig. 4, is a constantly variable spherical curve due to the fact that the sphere being wound increases in diameter with each convolution wound thereon.

To clearly understand the resultant spherical motion produced in the core by the single driving member, it is to be understood that by a circular motion is meant a motion which, moving in the same direction, will return to its starting point, and, when the specific point at which the core to be wound contacts the single driving member is considered, then the size and shape of the several circular motions separately and collectively must be such as to remain within the boundary of the operating face of the single driving member.

It will be clear to those experienced in art that my new method of concentrating the resultant effect of the several circular motions into a single driving point (practically speaking) on the operative face of a single driving member, for each core, and the several cores on the same single driving member, results in a wound sphere not possible to obtain with two or more driving points. The several embodiments in which this method is shown incorporated are simple, operative, and permit the winding of several cores simultaneously.

It will be apparent that a slight change in the characteristics of the machine necessary to change the relationship of the circle A, orb B or orb C (Fig. 4) will result in an entirely different development form for the line indicated at Al from that which is shown. The particular dimensional and speed relationships have been selected to produce a winding pattern on the surface of the finished ball which is well suited for the proper amalgamation of the wound filament and the cover to be placed thereover, as for example, the balata cover of golf balls.

While two types of embodiments of the invention have been illustrated and described with particularity, it is to be understood that the invention may be variously embodied within the limits of the prior art and the scope of the subjoined claims.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for winding a body of filamentary material on a core to form a spherical ball, comprising in combination, means for holding a core, means for winding a filament thereon, means for applying mechanical tension to said strand to elongate it, and means for applying heat to the strand to elongate it as it is fed to said core.

2. Apparatus for winding a body of filamentary material on a core to form a spherical ball, comprising in combination, means for holding a core in a given position, and a disc-shaped core-driving device moving about a constantly changing center of rotation and engaging the core near its periphery, said core holding means including a plurality of angularly disposed rotatable discshaped members forming with said core-driving device a pocket for holding said core.

3. Apparatus for winding a body of filamentary material on a core to form a spherical ball, comprising in combination, means for holding a core in a given position, and a rotatable parti-spherical core-driving device, the axis of which moves in a conical path, which engages the core on its spherical surface.

4. Apparatus for winding a body of filamentary material on a core to form a spherical ball, comprising in combination, means for holding a core in a given position, and a rotatable partispherical core-driving device, the axis of which moves in a conical path, which engages the core on its spherical surface, said core-holding means comprising a plurality of rotatable rollers forming with said core-driving device a pocket for holding said core.

5. The method of winding spherical bodies formed of a core and a body of filamentary material wound thereon, which comprises, driving the core through a single point on its surface to wind filament thereon, simultaneously moving the core by action through the drive point to distribute the filament on the core during the winding action, and simultaneously moving the core by action through the drive point to continuously change the relation between the winding and distributing movements.

6. The method of winding" spherical bodies formed of a core and a body of filamentary material wound thereon, which comprises, driving the core through a single point of contact on its surface with a driving member to wind filament thereon, simultaneously moving the core by action of the driving member through the point of contact to distribute the filament on the core during the winding action, simultaneously moving the core by action of the driving member through the point of contact to continuously change the relation between the winding and distributing movements, feeding filament to the core at said contact point, and separating the wound sphere from the driving member while the latter continues its movement to stop the movement of the sphere and the feeding of the filament.

7. The method of winding a plurality of spherical bodies, each formed of a core and a body of filamentary material wound thereon, which comprises, starting and maintaining the movement of a single driving member, selectively bringing a plurality of cores into single point contact with a single driving zone of the driving member, feeding filaments to said cores at the point of contact of each with the driving member, and selectively removing the wound spheres from the driving member while the latter continues its movement to stop the movement of the sphere and the feeding of the filament.

8. The method of winding spherical bodies, each formed of a core and a body of filamentary material wound thereon, which comprises, feeding in fresh cores and removing finished wound spheres contemporaneously to and from a single common driving zone of a single driving member while the driving member continues in unaltered movement.

9. The method of winding spherical bodies formed of a core and a body of filamentary material wound thereon, which comprises, driving the core through a single point of contact on its surface with a driving member to wind filament thereon, and separating the wound sphere from said driving member by substituting another member for the driving member at the point of drive of the core.

10. The method of winding spherical bodies formed of a core and a body of filamentary material wound thereon which comprises, driving the core through a single point of contact on its surface with a.driving member to wind filament thereon, imparting to the core through its single point of driving contact a motion which is the resultant of three separate continuous circular motions, supplying filament to the core at the point of contact, and feeding to and removing cores from the driving member by a substitution of holding and driving members at the point of contact, whereby the filament is held to the core at the contact point before, during and after winding until the wound sphere is removed.

11. The method of winding spherical bodies formed of a core and a body'of filamentary material wound thereon, which comprises, driving said core through a single point on its surface to move the core about an axis, simultaneously acting upon said core through the drive point to move it about a second axis, simultaneously acting upon said core through the drive point to move it about a third axis to change the relation between the axes, and feeding filament to the core during said movements to form a sphere with windings having characteristics produced by the joint effects of said movements.

12. Apparatus for winding a body of filamentary material on a core to form a spherical ball, comprising in combination, core holding means providing a pocket for holding the core, a core driving member driving the core through substantially a single point, and means for driving said member to simultaneously rotate the core about a polar circle, turn it about an equatorial circle at right angles to the polar circle and passing through the drive point of the core, and also oscillate the core about a small circle.

13. Apparatus for winding a body of filamentary material on a core to form a spherical ball, comprising in combination, core holding means providing a pocket for holding the core, a core driving member driving the core through substantially a single point, and means for separating the ball from the core driving member, said separating means assuming the same relationship to said core as formerly occupied by the driving member.

14. Apparatus for winding a body of filamentary material on a core to form a spherical ball, comprising in combination, a single driving member having a single driving zone for driving a plurality of cores through a single point, a plurality of pocket-like core holders distributed along the driving zone of said members, and a plurality of devices for separating said cores selectively from the driving member while the latter continues its movement, the separating means assuming the same relationship to said core as formerly occupied by the driving member.

15. Apparatus for winding a body of filamentary material on a core to form a spherical ball, which comprises, a rotatably mounted body, a shaft rotatably mounted on said body, a core driving member rotatably mounted on said shaft, means for simultaneously driving said body, said shaft, and said member, and means for holding a core in driving contact with said member.

16. Apparatus for winding spherical forms, comprising, a rotatably mounted body, a shaft rotatably mounted on said body, a core driving member mounted for rotation on said shaft, means for driving said member in unison with said body, and means for rotating said shaft on said body.

17. Apparatus as set forth in claim 16 further characterized by the fact that the axes of rotation of said body, said shaft and said member are generally parallel.

18. Apparatus as set forth in claim 16 further characterized by the fact that the shaft axis is disposed at an angle to the axis of the body.

19. Apparatus for winding spherical forms, comprising, a rotatably mounted body, a planet shaft rotatably mounted on said body, an eccentric portion on said shaft, a core driving member rotatably mounted on the eccentric portion of said shaft, and means for rotating said shaft on said body.

FRANK HONIG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4846910 *May 26, 1987Jul 11, 1989Acushnet CompanyPreparation of wound golf ball cores
US5007594 *Apr 5, 1989Apr 16, 1991Acushnet CompanyPreparation of wound golf ball cores
US5133509 *Dec 31, 1990Jul 28, 1992Acushnet CompanyPreparation of wound golf ball cores
US6290162 *Jan 18, 2000Sep 18, 2001Sumitomo Rubber Industries, Ltd.Apparatus and method for manufacturing golf ball
US6390405Jul 5, 2000May 21, 2002Acushnet CompanyGolf ball winding apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/435.1, 242/443.1, 139/217
International ClassificationB29D99/00
Cooperative ClassificationB29L2031/54, B29D99/0042
European ClassificationB29D99/00G