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Publication numberUS2161688 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1939
Filing dateOct 25, 1935
Priority dateOct 25, 1935
Publication numberUS 2161688 A, US 2161688A, US-A-2161688, US2161688 A, US2161688A
InventorsSchwartz Louis H
Original AssigneeWatler A Arnesen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Transilluminating device
US 2161688 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 6, 1939- L.. H. SCHWARTZ 2,161,688

TRANS ILLUMINATING DEVICE Filfad Oct. 25, 1935 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR ,V/B S +5@ 'June 6, 1939. L. H. SCHWARTZ 2,161,688

TRANS ILLUMINATING DEVICE Filed Oct. 25, 1935 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEYS Patented June 6, 1939 PATENT OFFICE TRAN SILLUMINATING DEVICE Louis H. Schwartz, New York, N. Y., assignor to Walter A. Arnesen, New York, N. Y.

Application October 25, 1935, Serial No. 46,704

9 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in diagnostic instruments and more particularly to improvements in transilluminating devices.

Transilluminators have been made and used heretofore as single units in which the source of light rays is mounted at the end of a rod or some similar member. In some types of examinations it is desirable to compare the results of one inspection against those of another. 'Ihe practice has been to inspect a certain portion of the patients anatomy, retaining a visual image of the inspected portion and compare it with a subsequent inspection. Such practice, of course, is not positive and is not satisfactory for other vl5 reasons.

An object of the present invention is to provide a transilluminating instrument of such character that more than one portion of a patients anatomy can be examined simultaneously.

o Another object of the invention is to provide a transilluminating instrument made up of two or more tubular members having sources of light rays mounted in the ends thereof, such members being so connected that the light carrying ends can be 5 moved relative to each other to be brought into approaching or separated relation.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a transilluminating instrument in which the light carrying membersl are mounted for recti- 30 linear motion relative to each other.

A further object of the invention is to provide a transilluminating instrument in which the lightI carrying members are mounted pivotally near their bases so that their light carrying tips can r,5 be moved relative to each other.

In carrying out the foregoing and other objects of the invention, a transilluminating instrument in the preferred form, comprises a handle through which the electrical conductors 40 pass, and a pair of light carrying members secured to the handle in such fashion that these members can be moved in a rectilinear motion relative to each bther. The motion of these members can be secured in various ways, such as by manually sliding one member relative to the other along guide bars, or by sliding one member relative to the other through the agency of a Wormand-gear arrangement.

In a simpler form of the invention the two light 50 carrying members, which are of tubular form, can be pivotally secured together near their bases so that these members can be moved along radii relative to each other to cause their light carrying tips to assume the desired positions. The light carrying members, which are tubular in form (Cl. 12S-23) and which have light bulbs connected to one end thereof, ordinarily have caps over the light bulbs with small openings therein'for projecting light rays in a desired direction.v These caps can be removed however and when the tube tips are 5 brought together the light bulbs can be covered by a suitable transparent shield for oral examinations, etc.

Other features, objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following 10 detailed description of the accompanying drawings illustrating the same, wherein Fig. 1 is a plan View partially in section and partially fragmentary of the preferred form of the invention.

Fig. 2 is a View at a different angle of the same device.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged section taken substantially on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged section taken substan- 20 tially on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 5 is a View of a portion of the connector arrangement shown in Fig. 3.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary View showing the manner in which the light bulbs carried by the arms can be 'enclosed in a transparent shield,

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary plan View of a modication of the device.

Fig. 8 is a section taken substantially on the line 8-8 of Fig. 9. 30

Fig. 9 is an enlarged section taken substantially on the line 9--9 of Fig. 7.

Fig. 10 is a section taken substantially on the line IIl-IO of Fig. '7.

Fig. 11 is a view of a still further modifica- 35 tion oi' the invention.

Referring now to the drawings and particularly to Figs. 1 to 6, inclusive, I Il indicates the handle of a trans-illuminating device embodying the invention, such handle being made pref- 40 erably of some good insulating material, and being hollow for the passage of electrical conductors II and II in a cable I2. 'Ihe upper part of the handle is also hollowed out to a considerable extent to receive contact members of the assembly. Positioned diametrically opposite the upper part of the handle are openings for the passage of a round bar I4, The bar I4 forms one of three slide bars which serve as conductors and also as guideways in the operation of the device. These bars have their end portions hollowed out and internally threaded for the reception of screws I8. The bars are held in properly spaced relation by means of triangularly shaped blocks of insulating material I6, which areapertured and partially counterbored to receive the ends of the bars. Thus, in addition to the bar I4, the device includes two bars I1, the positions of which are indicated by the attaching screws I8 of Fig. 2.

One of the transilluminating tubes is fixed substantially immovable relative to the handle I0. This bar comprises a hollo-w metallic cylinder 20, the upper Vend of which is internally threaded as at 2|l for the reception of a light bulb 22. YLocated within the tube 20 is a conductor` rod 24 having a spring contact member 25 secured to the upper end thereof. This rod :2.4 has a spring receiving sleeve 2B screwed to one end thereof, the sleeve 26 being provided with a shoulder 21 bearing against one side of an insulating disk 28, the other side of which rests against an internal shoulder 29 of the tube. A similar insulating disk 30' rests between the internal shoulder 3| of the tube and the contact v25,. By this arrangement the conductor rod 24 is, positively positioned in the tube. The sleeve 26which is hollow, serves as a receptacle for a spring 32, and the lower end thereof is externally threaded to enter a. cup 34. The bottom of the cup 34 is centrally apertured for the passage of a Contact rod which has a ilange `35 on the inner end thereof to prevent the rod from dropping out of the cup. The spring 32, of course, normally presses this rod 35 toward the handle I0. This lower end of the tube 20 has a squared portion 31 in whichare provided a pair of oppositely disposed openings 38 for the passage lof the rods I1. These rods fit in the openings 38 close enough toV make good electrical contact with the tube 20. Below the squared portion 31 the Ytube 2D is provided with an enlarged cylindrical skirt portion 40 which fits snugly within the upper end of the handle' I0. A set screw 4| passes through an opening in the handle into a matched opening in this skirt portion to lock the tube 20 relative to the handle. v

TheY contact mechanism vwithin the handle I0 comprises in part aY metallic ring'4r5 centrally disposed, which has a conductor rod 46, one end of which is enlarged at 41. The enlarged end of this rod 41 is hollowed out for the reception of a spring 48 and a pin 49. The proper alignment of the member 46 relative tothe ring 45 is accomplished by means of two anged'collars of insulating material 5U and 5|.i A terminal member 52 having a central orifice therein ts around the insulating collar 50 between shoulders thereof, and one end of theY ring 45. The shoulder of the other insulating collar 5| rests against the opposite end of the ring 45 and against the enlargement 41 Vof the member Vv4|i. These parts are locked in this position by spread- Y ing out the end of the member 4B afterit passes through the central opening of a terminal 55. A Y

suitable-tool may be used to rivet this end of the member and lock the parts together. The two terminals 52 and 55 are connected to the conductors II and II', Y

The skirt portion V4I) of the tube 20 .is provided withY opposite openings 5B of greater diameter than the rod 24, such opening .56 kbeing in line 1 with-the openings inV theV handle sothat .the rod I4 canpass through the handleand through .the skirtY portion.L inasmuch as it is desired for thisgrod I4 to serve as one terminal for the trans-V illuminating devices, the arrangement of the parts `'is suchthat .the spring pressed ,rod 35 and the spring .pressed rod'49. bear against opposite sides .of the rod I4 as `it passes through the handle andthe skirt 40 (Fig. 3). Thus the rod I4 is energized by the conductor I'I', and the cir# n cuit from the rod I4 continues to the spring terminal 25. If desired, however, the rods 35 and Since the rod I4 is included in one side of Vthe electrical circuit utilized it becomes neces- VVsary to provide means for completing the cir-l cuit through the light bulb. This means is made up of a spring switch 60 having a button 6I on the end thereof. The spring is secured to the ring 45 by means of a screw 62 passing therethrough and through the handle I0 into threaded engagement with an aperture 64 in the ring 45. The button 6I is utilized to press the offset end of the spring `60 against the outer surface of the tube 20, Thus an electrical circuit is set up in the following manner. From the conductor II to terminal 52, ring 45, spring 60, the metal of the tube 2D, to one terminal of the light bulb 22, thence to the spring contact 25, rod 24, spring pressed rod 35, rod I4, `Contact rod 49, member 46, termi-nal 55 to the conductor II. At the same time that this circuit is made up, the rods I1 as -well' as the rod I4 are energized.

TheV other -transilluminating member comprises a tube 2liV constructed `in a similar manner to the `tube `2|] -with the exception that the skirt portion 40 is omitted. VThe internal arrangement of this tube is substantially as that described for the -member 240 with the exception, of course, that the spring .pressed contact Arod `49 and its associated mechanism is not necessary. By reference to Fig. -1 it will be seen that a spring pressed contact rod 35 extends downwardly from the member 20 to engage -the slide rod I4. Since the rods `I4 and -I'1 are connected in the circuit, they serve. as conductors -to complete the circuit through a bulb i-'n the member 20'.

Y ternal examinations spring caps "I0 and 10 are inserted yover the light bulbs in the ends of the Ymembers 20 -and 20', these caps -each having an opening 1I in the top thereof for the passage of rays -from Athe bulbs.V If it -is desired fto make an examination Aof for example, .the sinus ducts'of aipatient, the two members 20 and 2| can be adjusted -so Athat the caps 10 and 10 are properly positioned on each side of the nasal passage. Since 4these `parts can be adjusted relative to each other, -it follows that the instrument can Y-accornmodateithe facial structure of any patient. 'I'he Vforegoing use, of course, vis merely; illustrative of one of xthe many uses to which the device can be put. In addition, should it be desired 'to use Vthe instrument inn the -making Vof oral examinations, thetwo caps 10 and 1-0 can "-be removed, the parts 20 and 20 rbrought together as closely raspossible, and the Vexposed bulbs 22 enclosed byV a transparent shield 15. This shield can be made of glass or of anyother suitable substance, the only requirement -being that Iit .b ei of .transparent material and that it be capable of sterilization.

In the .modification shown in Figs. 7 toV 10, inelusive, `8|) represents aV casing of some suitable kinsulating `'material. This casing is hollowed out Vfor the reception of .the base of VaV stationary member |20 (dotted lines, Fig. 7), which is held ifoY in place bya set screw 8| passing through the housing and engaging the base 82 of the member |20. The casing 8i) is provided for a part of its length with a cavity 83 in which the base 84 of the movable member |20' is seated. Adjacent the cavity 83 is a cylindrical cavity 85. These two cavities are joined by the removal of the wall therebetween, the opening so formed serving to receive an offset 86 of the base 84. This cavity 85 has a coaxial portion 81 of reduced diameter at its inner end.

The offsets 86 is cut into the shape of gears or teeth to enga-ge a worm 88 positioned in the cavity 85. One end of the worm 88 fits in the reduced portion 87 of the cavity. The other end of the worm passes through a plate 8g secured to the end of the casing into engagement with a thumb wheel 98 utilized for rotating the worm. Due to this arrangement of parts rotation of the worm imparts longitudinal movement to the base 84, and accordingly to the member |28.

In order that the desired electrical circuits can be completed, two bus bars of springy material are fastened in the casing. One bus bar is seated in a recess extending longitudinally of the casing and positioned adjacent the upstanding side walls of the two base members 82 and 81|. This bus bar 85 is iixed to the base 82 so that it makes good electrical contact with the metal of the member |28. Since the bus bar is of spring material it bears againsts the base 84 to make good electrical contact therewith, regardless of the longitudinal position of the member |28 relative to the casing. The other bus bar 98 is positioned in a recess in the bottom of the casing, making close contact with a terminal member 91 extending below the base 82 and having a continuation thereof extending upwardly through the member |20 to the usual central contact for the light bulb. Suitable insulating means can be utilized for insulating the terminal 91 and its extension from the member |20. A similar member 9B extends below the base 84, and since the bus bar 96 normally is forced upwardly by its spring character, good contact with the terminal 98 is always assured. These two bus bars 95 and 96 have conductors 99 and |88 connected to them respectively. These conductors 99 and |60 may pass downwardly through a suitable handle which can be affixed to the casing 80 in any desired position..

This device can be utilized in the same canner as that previously described, the only difference in operation being that movement of one member relative to the other is accomplished through the worm and gear mechanism.

In Fig. 11 a simplified form of the instrument is illustrated, such instrument consisting of the transilluminating members 220 and 22|. These members have metallic bands |0| and |32 secured around them respectively, the bands being fastened together between the members in any suitable pivotal connection shown generally at |04. Since the members 22|) and 22| are of metal and the bands lill and |82 are also of metal, a single conductor |85 may be secured to either one of the members 228 or 22| or either one of the bands, thereby energizing the members themselves. These members have central contacts |86 which are insulated from the tubes of the members and which lead to the usual central spring contact for the light bulb. Another conductor |01 may be connected to the two terminals |06.

The device just described is capable of being utilized for the same purpose as those previously described, the only difference being that the two members more relative to each other in are fashion instead of rectilinear fashion.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the present invention in any form illustrated provides novel and useful transilluminating devices which are adaptable to a number of uses, and which are superior to the single transilluminating devices heretofore used, yor to two transilluminating devices used concurrently. It will be apparent that modications other than those shown can be made, without departing from the scope of the invention, and, accordingly, this invention is not to be limited to the illustrated embodiments but is to be limited only by the following claims.

I claim:

1. A transilluminating device for manual use comprising a plurality of elongated electrically energized illuminating tubes having sources of light rays at their tips, said tubes being so connected for relative movement that the distance between the tips thereof can be varied and the tips can be moved into close proximity, and a transparent shield adapted to fit over and inclose the ends of the tubes when the tips thereof are in close proximity.

2. A transilluminating device for manual use comprising a plurality of electrically energized illuminating tubes having sources of light rays at their tips, said tubes having their bases so pivotally secured thereto that the distance between the tips thereof can be varied and that the tips thereof can be moved into close proximity, and a transparent shield adapted t-o i'lt over and inclose the ends of the tubes when the tips thereof are in close proximity..

3. A transilluminating device for manual use comprising a plurality of electrically energized illuminating tubes having sources of light rays at their tips, a plurality of spaced guide rods passing through the bases of said tubes whereby said tubes can slide relative to each other to vary the distance between their tips.

4. A transilluminating device comprising a plurality of electrically energized illuminating tubes having sources of light rays at their tips, a plurality of spaced guide rods passing through the bases of said tubes whereby said tubes can slide relative to each other to vary the distance between their tips, said rods serving as electrical connectors.

5. A transilluminating device for manual use comprising a handle, an electrically energized illuminating tube secured to one end of the handle, a plurality of spaced guide rods passing through the base of said tube, and a second electrically energized illuminating tube secured to said rods, said rods serving as guide members for relative sliding movement between the tubes to vary the distance between` the tips of the tubes.

6. A transilluminating device comprising a handle, an electrically energized illuminating tube secured to one end of said handle, a plurality of spaced guide rods passing through the base of said tube, and a second electrically energized illuminating tube slidable on said rods for movement to vary the distance between the tips of the tubes, said rods serving as electrical connectors between the tubes.

7. A transilluminating device comprising an electrically energized illuminating tube having its tip socketed for the reception of an electric light bulb, the material of said tube serving as a conductor for one terminal of a bulb socketed Cil therein, an insulated conductorwithin said tube leading to the other terminal for said bulb, current carrying conductors electrically connected to said tube, a plurality of spaced guide rods passing through the base of said'tube, and a second tube similar to the. first tube and having said guide Yrods passing through the vbase thereof whereby one tube may slide on said guide rods relative to the other tube, saidirodsserving as electrical conductors between thetubes.

8. A transilluminating device comprising an electrically energized `illuminating tube having its tip socketed for the reception'of an electric light bulb, the material of said tube servingV as a conductor forY one'terminal of a bulb socketedV y therein, an insulated conductor Within said tube leading to the other terminal for said bulb, current carrying conductors electrically Yconnected. to said tube, a plurality of spaced guide rods passing through the base of said tube, and a second tube similar to the rst tube and havingrsad guide rodsV passing through the base thereof whereby one tube may slide on said guide rods relative to the other tube, said rods serving as electrical conductors between the tubes, and a handle'having one end secured to the base of one of said tubes.'

9. A transilluminating device for manual use comprising a casing of insulating material, a pair of electrically energized illuminating tubes having their bases secured in said casing, a worm: and gear arrangement in said casing operating to cause relative sliding movement between said tubes in the casing and electrical connections between said tubes, and Va transparent shield adapted to iit over and enclose the outer ends of the tubes when the tips of said tubes are in close proximity.

LOUIS H. SCHWARTZ.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4619249 *Jul 24, 1985Oct 28, 1986Kim LandryTranscutaneous intravenous illuminator
US6923762 *Oct 22, 2002Aug 2, 2005Frank C. Creaghan, Jr.Venoscope apparatus
US20120101342 *Oct 19, 2011Apr 26, 2012Duffy Thomas PPediatric tissue illuminator
US20120101343 *Oct 19, 2011Apr 26, 2012Duffy Thomas PMedical imaging device
USRE33234 *Aug 8, 1988Jun 19, 1990Kim LandryTranscutaneous intravenous illuminator
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/249, 362/239
International ClassificationA61B1/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61B1/06
European ClassificationA61B1/06