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Publication numberUS2162674 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 13, 1939
Filing dateMay 13, 1938
Priority dateMay 13, 1938
Publication numberUS 2162674 A, US 2162674A, US-A-2162674, US2162674 A, US2162674A
InventorsWilliam C Kenney
Original AssigneeKenney Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Curtain rod
US 2162674 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 13, 1939. w c KENNEY 2,162,674

CURTAIN ROD Fiied May 15, 1938 INV ENT OR.

Vtlla'am GKe/zney BY 9 ATTORNEYS- Patented June 13, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CURTAIN ROD Application May 13, 1938, Serial No. 207,726

3 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in prong brackets for supporting C-shaped curtain or other rods.

In earlier brackets the frictional engagement between the base of the prong and the bottom flange of the rod was depended upon to prevent the'rod from accidentally disengaging from the prong by a direct upward lifting movement.

Usually the height of the prong, exclusive of the projection which entered the aperture in the top flange of the rod, was substantially equal to the width of the rod between its flanges so that when the aperture in the top flange of the rod was entered over the. projectiton at the upper end of the prong and the rod swung to final position, the bottom flange of the rod fulcrumed on the base of the bracket prong and was expanded thereby so as to snap over the prong.

One objection to the snap-on prong, however, is that the prong proper, being dimensioned to exactly fit a certain width of rod, does not properly fit a wider rod, and where used with a wider rod does not prevent the rod from accidentally disengaging from the prong .by direct upward lifting movement. The difference in width between a rod which will snap over the bracket prong and be held thereby and a rod whichwill be loose on such prong is very slight, and in the case of a telescopic rod is represented by the difference in width between the outer and inner telescoping rod sections.

If the inner rod section proper fits the bracket prong at one side of the window or other opening and the slightly wider outer rod section loosely fits the bracket prong, at the opposite side 'of such opening,=.it is necessary, in order to prevent the outer rod section from accidentally disengaging from its prong by direct upward lifting movement, to compress the top and bottom flanges of such outer rodsectiton towards each other a distance equal to the difference in width between the two rod sections.

Another objection to the snap-on prong is that the engagement of the rod and prong requires considerable pressure to expand the bottom rod flange over the prong base, and that under certain circumstances, such pressure may not always be conveniently applied. This is particularly true where the rod is of considerable length, as in spanning a wide window, doorway or other opening, and where, moreover, the rod is to be hung at a height above the convenient reach of the person installing the rod, as where the person needs to stand on a chair or step ladder. Under such conditions it is practically impossible for the person (Cl. 24S--262) simultaneously to grasp both ends ofthe'rod with his hands and exert sufficient pressure simultaneously to snap both rod ends over both bracket prongs.

Broadly, the object of my invention is to provide 5 a prong bracket which will avoid these and other objections to the prong brackets now in use while at the same time giving new advantages not pos sible with the present brackets, all without adding to the expense of the bracket, or without requiring any new technique in applying or removing the rod from the bracket.

According to my invention, I avoid the necessity for a close frictional engagement at the base of the bracket prong with the bottom flange of the bracket, in order to prevent accidental disengagement of the rod from the prong by a direct upward lifting movement. This I accomplish by so designing the bracket that once the projection at the upper end of the prong is engaged through the opening in the top flange of the rod and the rod swung to final position, the rod is positively locked against accidental engagement from the prong by direct upward lifting movement regardless of the degree of looseness or tightness of fit between the rod and prong;

This permits the same prong to be used with different widths of rod without danger of the rod accidentally disengaging from the prong. It also avoids the necessity for exerting any force or pressure for the purpose of expanding the bottom flange of the rod over the base of the bracket mum of convenience, the action simplybeing a hooking and unhooking action of rod and prong, as distinguished from a snap-on and snap-off action. I

In the accompanying specification and drawing I have described and illustrated an embodiment of my invention which I have found highly satisfactory in service and well suited to the requirements of manufacture on a commercial scale. In the drawing:

Fig. l is a perspective view of a curtain rod installation in accordance with my invention.

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of one of my novel prong brackets detached.

Fig. 3 diagrammatically illustrates the method of booking on or unhooking a curtain rod end with such bracket, and

Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary section through therod end and bracket when fully engaged, particularly showing the manner in which the rod end is restrained against accidental unhooking by movement in any given direction.

In its simplest embodiment my bracket comprises a base or wall plate In of conventional form, preferably provided with one or more holes II for the reception of the screws or the like by means of which the bracket is fastened to a wall or other suitable supporting surface S.

One vertical edge 20 of the plate I!) is bent at substantially right angles to provide an upstanding rod supporting prong or fin I2. The upper end of the prong I2 is shaped to provide a hook-portion or projection I3 spaced from the edge 20 of the plate I0, and adapted to penetrate an aperture I4 in the downturned top flange I5 of the C-shaped curtain or other rod I6. The base portion I! of the prong fits within the upturned bottom flange I8 of the rod. This flt may be a tight fit or a loose fit depending upon the width of the rod between its flanges.

If desired, the bottom flange I8 may be provided with an aperture corresponding to the aperture I4 in the top flange I5 so as to permit the rod to be interchangeably used as a right or left rod. The space between the hook-like projection I3 of the prong from the adjacent vertical edge 20 of the plate I provides a downwardly and rearwardly extending channel I9. Overhanging the channel I9 is a shoulder or looking projection 2|. This shoulder likewise extends outwardly from the vertical edge 2|] of the base plate at substantially right angles. It is co planar with the prong and extends towards the oppositely disposed hook portion I3 thereof, but is spaced therefrom a distance sufficient to permit the rod end to be entered into and withdrawn through the open mouth of the channel thus defined. The purpose of the locking shoulder or projection 2| is to prevent accidental disengagement of the rod end from the prong by direct vertical lifting movement of the rod end, any tendency towards such movement being met and stopped by the contact of the outer surface of the upper rod flange I with the under surface of the projection 2|.

The inner edge of the prong is preferably stopped as shown in Fig. 2 to provide a substantially horizontal ledge or supporting shoulder 22 disposed in a plane slightly below that of the under surface of the projection 2|. A portion of the inner surface of the top flange l5 of' the rod rests upon and is supported by said ledge 22 when the rod is fully engaged by the prong (see Fig. 4).

From the ledge or supporting shoulder 22 the inner edge of the prong is extended downwardly and rearwardly towards the vertical edge 20 of the base plate IE to form beneath the locking shoulder or projection 2| the inner or closed end of the channel within Which the extreme end portion of the top flange I5 of the rod may be received when the rod and prong are fully engaged as shown in Fig. 4.

When thus fully engaged, the penetration of the hook-like portion I3 of the prong through the aperture I4 of the top flange I5 which it closely fits restrains the rod against accidental disengagement from the prong by movement in either direction in a horizontal plane (see arrow A, Fig. 4). A portion of the inner surface of the top flange I5 rests on and is supported by the supporting shoulder 22 (see arrow B, Fig. 4). Theouter surface of said top flange I5 bears beneath the lower surface of the locking projection 2| and restrains the rod against accidental disengagement from the prong by a vertical upward lifting movement. (See arrow C, Fig. 4).

Thus, the rod is restrained from accidental disengagement, due to movement in any of these directions or in any combination of them, and this is true whether the fit of the base portion of the prong against the inner surface of the lower rod flange is a tight fit or a loose fit.

When engaging the rod end with the prong, the rod is first tilted to the angular position illustrated in Fig. 3 to enable the top flange to enter the open mouth of the channel I9 defined by the spaced projections I3 and 2|, and the aperture I4 of said flange to be penetrated by the hook-like projection I3 of the prong, after which the rod is swung to the horizontal position of Fig. 4 to bring the respective portions thereof into the hereinbefore described relationship with the cooperating portions of the prong and thereby lock the rod against accidental disengagement by movement in any direction.

When deliberately disengaging the rod end from the prong, the rod is first tilted to the angular position of Fig. 3 to clear the top flange from beneath the locking shoulder 2| and is then withdrawn upwardly through the channel I9 until the aperture I4 is wholly disengaged from the hooklike portion I3 of the prong.

The operation of engaging and disengaging the rod end from the prong is simple and convenient, being merely a hooking or unhooking action. As such, it does not require the application of any force or pressure, in order to insure that the rod and prong will not accidentally disengage, as is necessary where the prong base and lower rod flange have to be closely fitting, and their snapon spring engagement is relied upon to prevent them from accidentally disengaging.

Consequently, it is immaterial whether the flt of the base of the prong with the lower rod flange is a close or a loose fit, in so far as any tendency of the rod to accidentally disengage from the prong is concerned.

Thus, the same prong may be used with rods of different widths between flanges without the necessity of mechanically closing the flanges towards each other if the rod is too wide.

While I have shown a single prong bracket, obviously brackets with multiple prongs may be made in accordance with the teachings of my invention.

Obviously, also, various changes in design and arrangement may be made within the limits of the appended claims.

What I therefore claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. A supporting bracket for a flanged rod having an aperture in its top flange adjacent one end thereof, comprising a base plate, a locking projection extending from said base plate, an upstanding prong extending from said base plate below said locking projection, the upper edge of said prong being vertically spaced from said looking projection and terminating in a reduced hooklike projection disposed substantially opposite said locking projection and laterally spaced therefrom and defining therewith an open-mouth, closed-bottom channel no wider at its bottom than at its mouth within which the adjacent open end of the rod is adapted to be inserted and locked with the aperture in the top flange of said rod lodged over the hook-like projection of the prong and the outer surface of said top flange lodged beneath the under surface 'of said locking projection.

2. The bracket of claim 1, the height of the prong, exclusive of said hook-like projection, being less than the distance between the flanges of the rod whereby the lower edge of the prong is spaced from the lower flange of the rod when the rod and prong are fully engaged.

3. A supporting bracket for a flanged rod having an aperture in its top flange adjacent one end thereof, comprising a. base plate for attachment to a wall or like supporting surface, a locking projection extending at substantially right angles from one longitudinal edge of said plate, a prong extending at substantially right angles from said longitudinal edge of said plate below said locking projection, the upper edge of said prong being shaped to provide a reduced hook-like portion disposed substantially opposite to and spaced laterally from said locking projection and defining therewith and with said longitudinal edge of the base plate an open-mouth closed-bottom channel within Which the adjacent open end of the rod is adapted to be inserted and locked by lodging the aperture in the top flange of the rod over said hook-like portion of the prong with the outer surface of said top flange engaged beneath the under surface of said locking projection, there being a horizontally disposed supporting shoulder on the inner edge of said prong between the ends of said channel on which a portion of the inner surface of the top flange of the rod rests when the rod end is fully engaged with the prong, and said locking projection, said hook-like portion of the prong, and said shoulder combinedly acting to restrain the rod against accidental dis lodgment by movement laterally or vertically.

WILLIAM C. KENN'EY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2679373 *Mar 24, 1950May 25, 1954Henley Arthur ECurtain rod hanger
US4399917 *Jun 11, 1981Aug 23, 1983Graber Industries, Inc.Dual curtain rod assembly
US4586617 *Feb 21, 1980May 6, 1986Mcallister Jack SCurtain rod
US5062463 *Aug 6, 1990Nov 5, 1991Peters Margaret AWindow cornice and method for hanging curtains
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/262
International ClassificationA47H1/142
Cooperative ClassificationA47H1/142
European ClassificationA47H1/142