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Publication numberUS2163011 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 20, 1939
Filing dateAug 7, 1937
Priority dateAug 7, 1937
Publication numberUS 2163011 A, US 2163011A, US-A-2163011, US2163011 A, US2163011A
InventorsCarleton P Schaub
Original AssigneeCarleton P Schaub
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game
US 2163011 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 20, 1939.

C. P. SCHAUB Filed Aug. 7, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet l ETREET CAR W RAH. ROAD 'PUBUC. BUILDNG TRAFFIC. SIGNAL RR CROSNNG NO PARKING AREA PLAY GROUND INVENTOR.

Carleion P Jchau/Za ATTORNEY June 20, 1939. 1

Filed Aug. 7, 1937 C. P. SCHAUB GAME 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 'D'RlVER 'PEDEfiTFd AN DTUVER 'PEDE5TR\AN ABVANQE lbLocK ADVANCE \BLOCK ADVANCE snows ADVANCE SPEED- 20 mm SPEED- 25mm 315L006 CAUTTON AT \F \N coNaEsTEW SCHOOL zones AREA OR 'FASSTNG 5 CHOOL 2on5" mam 0R \lFT TURN oPnon L DRAW TRAW'C TAG ANDPAY HNE \MPOSED. Fig. 2/ Fig.5 13

I RED CARD BLUE CART).

WHO HAS RTGHT-OF WAY 2 \NCOR'RECT ANEaYYER 'D'RAW "BLUE CARD.

SPEED 3O \L'EH IF INCORRECT ANSWER FROM RED CARD-ONEUOLLAR FINE.

5PEED-4O NT'TH. COURT HOUTJE ONE TURN-NED TWO -DOLLAR? fiPEEUSOMPH. COURTHOU5E ONE TURN-WORKHOUSE I TURN-FEDEfiTNAIL INVENTOR. Carleion P Jchaub ATTORNEY Patented June 20, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFECE GAME Carleton P. Schaub, St. Paul, Minn.

Application August 7, 1937, Serial No. 157,880

2 Claims.

The present invention relates to improvements in games.

'An object of the present invention is to provide a game to be played by a plurality of opposing players and which will be instructive with respect to automobile and pedestrian trafiic rules, and which will include features to demonstrate the knowledge already possessed by players with respect to traffic rules and which will permit a certain amount of skill and judgment on the part of the players in the playing operation to make the game particularly interesting.

In carrying out the invention a board is employed inscribed to represent a geographical sec- .tion,'as a city, with its different traflic zone sections and its streets, with stop and trailic signals, playgrounds, public buildings, etc. The playing board is used by two or more opposing players who are supplied with objects to indicate a vehicle which are moved from a beginning point upon the game board through the streets, with the firstv player returning to the starting point winning the game.

Several sets of cards are used by the players to control in certain respects the moves made by the players. One set of cards will indicate the distance the player may move the playing object. Another, co-operating set of cards will designate traffic or penalty cards, which, under certain conditions indicated by the primary cards, will be drawn by a player, the traffic cards showing certain traffic violation penalties.

Another set of question cards is designed to be drawn by the player in the playing of the game under certain conditions stated upon the primary cards to bring about a showing of the knowledge already possessed by the player as to trafiic rules, etc.

In playing the game each'player turns one of the primary cards, which indicates the amount of advance the player may make with his moving element. This primary card in addition to advising the player as to conditions under which he shall draw one of the traffic tag cards, showing penalties to be imposed upon the player, or one of the other sets of cards requiring the player to give information as to the knowledge possessed by him as to certain traific rules. The primary cards and the traffic cards and the information cards are separate sets of cards, and preferably distinguished as by being of different color. The primary or playing cards, which will be drawn by the players to direct the advance of their elements, are preferably divided into separate instructions for drivers and pedestrians, so that if the player drawing a traffic card is penalized by being made a pedestrian, he will thereafter follow the rules inscribed upon the playing card applying to the pedestrian instead of the driver of a vehicle.

These and other features of the invention will be more particularly set forth in the following description and the; accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a plan view of a playing board forming a part of the game.

Figures 2, 3,4, and 5 designate different types of cards that are co-operatively used by the players in the playing of the game; and

Figure 6 represents a playing element.

Referring to the drawings in detail, A represents a playing board delineated to represent, on a reduced scale, a map, as of a city, showing the streets, zoning sections, suburban sections, stop and go signs, buildings, playgrounds,'etc. The letter B represents symbols delineated on the board at one side of the map, as an assistance to the players in the playing of the game.

The circles 2 upon the map represent zoning boundaries. The central zone represents the congested district and the outer zone the residential district, and the area outside of the outer zone the suburban district. The zoning spaces and the area outside of the zoned sections, in the play-' ing of the game, are subject to the special traffic regulations applying to such sections.

Upon the map is delineated at desired points in the streets, traific and stop sign symbols 3 and 4, street car lines 5 along the streets, schools .6, public buildings 1,- playgrounds 8, no-parking areas 9, railroads l0, and railroad stop signals I l.

In the playing of the game the element to be I moved, as will be hereinafter more particularly pointed out, will have a starting point in one of the suburban areas as indicated.

A plurality of primary playing cards l3, traflic cards or tags l4, and question cards l5 are employed. A playing element I6 representing a vehicle, as an automobile, is moved by the player over the route to be followed on the streets from the starting point aroundthe centrallylocated court house and back to the starting point, there being one of these elements used by each player, and the one first reaching the starting point on the return trip winning the game. I

The primary or travel regulation cards I 3 have inscribed upon them directions for travel, both for a vehicle and a pedestrian; for instance, the designation of the distance to be advanced, the

speed applying to the vehicle or playing element, data as to penalties pertaining to that particular card, as a notification that if in a congested zone a school is passed during the particular advance designated by that card, a traflic card must be drawn by the player and a fine imposed.

The directions on the primary or trarfic card may compel the drawing by the player of one of the question cards, and the player must then answer the question upon that card, with one of the other players acting as a referee to see if the question is answered correctly, or a special referee may be employed in the playing of the game. The different trafiic cards will also carry differing notifications for pedestrians, as for instance, requiring the pedestrian to lose a move under certain conditions, as in improperly crossing a street, requiring him to move to the hospi-v tal for one play, etc. The question cards must be answered by the player receiving the same carrying a notification to the player that in case of his failure to properly answer the question he must draw one of the penalty cards. As it will be understood, there is a plurality of trafiic travel regulation cards and a plurality of trafilc tag cards and a plurality of question cards.

The players will start the game with each player positioning his playing element at the starting point in one of the suburban areas. Suitable decision will be made by the players as to the succession of playing of the players. Players as they start from the starting point will first draw one of the main or travel regulation cards and will follow the directions upon that card, which will show him the distance he shall move his playing element toward the center of the board. He may choose his own line of travel throughout the streets in going toand returning from the center of the board to the starting point, subject to the directions upon the card. The player will be subject to the penalty or other provisions upon the particular travel card he draws; for instance, the particular card he draws may instruct him under certain conditions in the movement of his playing element to draw a trafiic card. It may cause him to draw one of the question cards and compel him to answer the questions upon that card; it may cause him to lose his rights as the driver of a vehicle and become a pedestrian, in which case his further travel back to the starting point will be subject to the rules upon the travel regulation cards applying to pedestrians instead of drivers. The idea of the game, as will be evident, isto subject the player in the playing of the game to the different characters of traffic regulations applying to both pedestrfians and drivers and to further show his knowledge of traffic rules through his drawing of question cards and having to answer questions upon those cards. The penalties imposed upon the player by the trafiic cards he draws and failing to properly answer the question cards he draws become the property of the player first reaching the starting point on his return trip, whether as the driver of a vehicle or as a pedestrian.

If, in the playing of the game, the penalties and position upon the cards drawn by the player carry him to the work house, police station, etc., his route of travel will be changed in that event by forcing him to then start out from the work house, police station, etc., to complete his travel. The idea of the present game is to simulate in the highest degree the traffic rules and conditions confronting both a driver of a vehicle and a pedestrian in driving or walking through a city, with its varying zoning and trafiic conditions, and also in the playing of the game to bring forth his existing knowledge as to traffic rules and at the same time to permit him in the playing of the game to exercise his judgment and skill as a driver in permitting him through the instrumentalities of the game to select his line of travel.

By means of the question cards and the refereeing of the questionsin the playing of the game,- the game is made particularly valuable for children by including questions pertinent to the conduct of children as in using the streets for roller skating, bicycling, playing in the streets, etc., the children thereby becoming educated with respect to compliance with trafiic and safety rules, and, as will be evident, the game constitutes a great aid in the universal safety program in connection with the use of streets by vehicles and pedestrians.

I am aware that it is old to have games wherein, through the shaking ofdice, or the drawing of a card, players are directed in going away from or returning to a starting point, but such games that have heretofore been used have not accomplished the object of the present invention in familiarizing a player with the trafiic rules and penalties and permiting him to demonstrate his knowledge of traflic requirements, and at the same time permit him in the playing of the game to exercise his judgment and skill as a driver as in his ability to personally direct his line of travel. These advantages are accomplished through the particular character of board and the plurality and character of the different sets of travel regulation cards, penalty tag cards, and question cards requiring a referee, independent of the player answering the cards, to demonstrate his knowledge and be penalized for lack of knowledge.

I claim:

1. In a traffic game including a game board, playing elements movable thereover and chance controlled means for directing the movement of said elements over said board; chance controlled means for imposing a provisional penalty upon a player for each traffic violation made by his playing element during its progress over said board, and means for then determining the final imposition or withdrawal of such penalty, said last named means calling for skill on the part of the player.

2. The structure of claim 1, said last named means comprising a deck of question cards.

CARLETON P. SCHAUB.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2811361 *Feb 3, 1954Oct 29, 1957Jr Willis Raymond WoolrichGame board
US4375889 *Jul 11, 1977Mar 8, 1983Burkett Nora ATraffic board game apparatus
US4953871 *Nov 22, 1988Sep 4, 1990Samuel AntwiTraffic board game
US5002283 *Jul 2, 1990Mar 26, 1991Norma LanghamDefensive driving question and answer game having separate interchange bridge section
US5645279 *May 20, 1996Jul 8, 1997Reutlinger; Alicia L.Vehicle history and trivia race game
US8172230Aug 17, 2006May 8, 2012Par-Go, LlcBoard game playing system and method of incorporating city landmarks
US20080042349 *Aug 17, 2006Feb 21, 2008Killgo Yvonne TBoard game playing system and method of incorporating city landmarks
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/252
International ClassificationA63F3/04, A63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00006, A63F3/0494
European ClassificationA63F3/04T