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Publication numberUS2163117 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 20, 1939
Filing dateNov 3, 1934
Priority dateNov 3, 1934
Publication numberUS 2163117 A, US 2163117A, US-A-2163117, US2163117 A, US2163117A
InventorsEvans Wil, Albert F Knaggs
Original AssigneeCalifornia Container Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tray
US 2163117 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 20, 1939. w. EVANS ET AL 2,163,117

TRAY Filed Nov. 3. 1934 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I15; El

INVENTORS W/L E VANS BYALBEPT F.- K/YAGGS THE/E ATTORNEY Patented 20,1939

UNIT-ED 1 STATE TRAY Wil Evans and Albert F. Knagc Oakland, cum,

assignors toCalii'ornia Container Corporation, Emeryville, Calii'.,a-eorporation of Delaware Application November 3,1934, Serial No. 751,352

v x 8 Claims.

Our invention relates to open containers, and

particularly to a tray for fruit, berries. vegetables and like products. 7

It is an object of our invention to providea tray wherein the side and end walls forcibly maintain each other in folded position.

Other objects of our invention are: To provide a tray which is of simple construction and which can be economically manufactured; to provide a tray construction wherein the side and end walls are highly resistantto collapsibility; to provide a tray of the character described, having an improved end construction; to provide means for easily and securely locking the walls of a folding tray in upright position; to provide a tray which lends itself readily to stacking in tiers while providing space for ventilation between trays and protecting the contents from crushing; to provide a tray which is adapted to be shipped or distributed in knocked-down form and which may be speedily and easily assembled for use; and to provide'a method for forming a tray from a single sheet.

our invention possesses numerous other objects-and features of advantage, some of which, together with the foregoing, will be apparent or will be specifically pointed out in the following description forming a part of this specification, but we do not limit ourselves to the embodiment of the invention herein illustrated, as various forms may be adopted within the scope of the claims. 1

Referring to the drawings.

Figure l is a plan view of the blank comprising our tray as it appears before folding, part of the blank being broken away to eliminate excessive length in the figure.

Figure 2 is a perspective view of'our tray, a portion of the end wall being broken away to show the enfolded tabs.

7 Figure 3 is a fragmentary plan view showing the position of the folds of the end flap and tab prior to folding the inner side wall.

Figure 4 is a vertical sectional view, partly in elevation, looking in the direction of the arrows 4-4 of Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a fragmentary plan view similar to Figure 3 but with the inner side wall in folded position, the bottom edge of the inner end wall being shown in dotted lines to illustrate the position to which it is forced by said side wall.

Figure 6 is a vertical sectional view, partly in elevation, looking in the direction of the arrows 6-6,of Figure 5. I

Broadly considered, our invention comprises a substantially rectangular shaped tray folded corrugated board, the sheet being so cut and from a single sheet of fibrous material such'as f scored that the tray may be completely assembled for use by the mere folding and interlocking of parts. We prefer that the ends of the tray be formed with an outer and an inner wall and a flat top, 'such inner wall being adapted to rest upon the bottom of the tray to brace or stabilize the top; also, that the sides be folded to provide walls of double thickness and of less height than the end walls, with the bottom portions of such inner side walls long enough to wedge the bottom corner portion of the inner end wall outwardly,

whereby each of said walls cooperates to forcibly maintain the other in folded position. A tab,

preferably formed as an extension of the side wall, is provided, and the same is adapted to be bent inwardly for enfoldment by the end walls to lock the side and ends of the tray in upright position.

In, greater detail, the preferred embodiment of our invention comprises a blank such as shown in Figure 1, preferably cut and creased in any well-known manner from a sheet of light-weight fibrous material such as corrugated or paper board. This blank is provided with two parallel longitudinal creases or hinge lines 2 and 3 and 'two parallel .transverse creases 4 and 5 which intersect said longitudinal creases at right-angles, thus forming a substantially rectangular bottom section 6 in the center of the sheet.

The ends of the longitudinal creases 2 and 3 terminate in the slits I, which separate the end flaps 8 from the tabs 9. These tabs are preferably formed as extensions of the side flaps l0, and are hinged thereto along the creases 4 and 5. The ends of the transverse creases 4 and 5 on the other hand terminate in the cuts II which define the distal parts of the side flaps l0.

In order to assemble the tray from the blank, the side flaps III with attached tabs 9 are turned upwardly along the creases 2 and 3. Tabs 9 are then bent inwardly along the creases 4 and 5 to conform to the end of the tray and folded inwardly and downwardly along the parallel creases l2 and I3 to form an upright portion l4, a shoulder I5 and a downturned wing l6. With the tabs 9 so positioned, the end flaps 8 are then turned upwardly along the creases 4 and 5 and then folded inwardly and downwardly along the parallel creases l1 and I8 to form outer end walls l9, inner end walls and a flat top 2|, which enfold the tabs 9 in their, assembled position.

It will be observed by reference to Figures 3 and 4 that the lower edge of the inner end wall 2| rests against the bottom 8 and thus stabilizes the top 2i, and that when the tabs 2 are enfolded by the end flaps l, a' substantial reinforcement is provided for the walls and top thereof, which makes the assembled end structure particularly resistant to collapsibility.

In the next and final step, the side flaps II are folded downwardly along the relatively close parallel creases 22 and 23 to form an outer side wall 24 and an inner side wall 25, which latter terminates adjacent the bottom 6. It is apparent that the spacing between the creases will vary in accordance with the thickness of the material used and that, if the material is relatively thin, a single crease will suflice to permit folding. It is to be noted that the bottom portion of the inner side wall 25, see Figures 3 and 4, is longer than the distance between the opposing inner end walls 20 of the tray and that upon folding the inner side wall 25 downwardly,

the inner end walls 20 are deformed in the manner illustrated in Figures 5 and 6, whereby each of said walls exerts a pressure upon the other to forcibly maintain the same in folded position, with the entire structure firmly locked together.

It will be observed that in the assembled tray the enfolded tabs 9 are firmly held against endwise withdrawal by reason of the wedging action exerted by the inner side wall 25 upon the wing it, and that such inner side wall is so shaped by cut II as to conform to the wedged position of the inner end wall 20.

While we have shown tabs 9 formed as extensions of the side flap l0 and folded'to provide the upright portion ll, shoulder l5 and wing it, it is to be understood that the portion it alone may be used, or such tab may be formed as a continuation of the end flaps 8 and inserted and secured between the side walls 24 and 25, or the flap may be entirely eliminated and the walls secured together in upright position in any .well known manner such as by stapling or by the application of glued strips, all without departing from the spirit of our invention.

We prefer that the ends of our tray shall be of greater height than the sides, whereby tops '2l provide raised supporting surfaces on which additional trays may be stacked so as to permit the circulation of air between adjacent trays, Since our tray particularly lends itself to the handling of perishable products such as fruit and vegetables, maximum ventilation is desirable. Therefore, we provide the end flaps I with apertures 26 and the tabs 9 with apertures 27 and arcuate notches 28, all so positioned that when the tabs and end flaps are in folded position the respective apertures and notches are in alignment, thus providing ventilation passages through the ends of the tray.

The ease and simplicity with which our tray may be folded for use permit the same to be conveniently packed in flat and unfolded condition. When so packed, the tray blanks require relatively small space and the cost of handling, shipping and storage is reduced to a We claim:

1. In a tray formed from a single blank, a bottom, an end flap hinged to said bottom and folded inwardly and downwardly along parallel creases to form an outer end wall, an inner end wall and a flat top, a side flap hinged to said bottom and-folded inwardly and downwardly along a single crease to form an outer side wall exert pressure against the and an inner side wall terminating adjacent said bottom, the portion of 'said inner side wall adjacent said bottom being long enough to exert pressure against the bottom of said inner end wall, and means for locking said side and end walls in upright position.

'2. In a tray formed from a single blank, a bottom, an end flap hinged to said bottom and folded inwardly and downwardly along parallel creases to form an-outer end wall, an inner end wall and a flat top, the end of said flap contacting said bottom to stabilise said top, a side flap hinged to said bottom and folded inwardly and downwardly along a single crease to form an outer side wall and an inner side wall terminating adjacent said bottom, the portion of said inner side wall adjacent said bottom being ,long enough to exert pressure tom of said inner end wall, and ing said side and end walls in upright position.

, 3. In a tray formed from a single blank, a bottom, an end flap hinged to said bottom and folded inwardly and downwardly along parallel creases to form an outer end wall, an inner end wall and a flat top, the end of said flap contacting said bottom to stabilize said toll. a side flap hinged to said bottom and folded inwardly and down.- wardly along a single crease to form an outer side wall and an inner side wall terminating-adjacent said bottom, the portion of said inner side wall adjacent said bottom being long enough to means for lockend walls. the edges of said inner side wall being cut at an angle to accommodate said flat top, and means for locking said side and end walls in upright position.

4. In a tray bottom, an end flap hinged to said bottom and folded inwardly and downwardly along parallel creases to form an outer end wall, an inner end wall and a flat top, the end of said flap contacting said bottom to stabilize said top, a side flap hinged to said downwardly along a single crease to fbrm an outer side wall and an inner side wall of less height than said end walls, said inner side wall terminating adjacent said bottom, the portion of said inner side wall adjacent said bottom being long enough to wedge the'bottom portionof said inner end wall outwardly toward said outer end wall, and means for lockingsaid side and end walls in upright position. i

5. In a tray formed from a single blank, a bottom, an end flap hinged to said bottom and folded inwardly and downwardly along parallel creases to form an outer end wall, an inner end wall and a flat top, the'end of said flap contacting said bottom to stabilize said top, a side flap hinged to said bottom and folded inwardly and downwardly along a single crease to form an outer side wall and aninner side wall of less height than said end walls, said inner side wall terminating adjacent said bottom, the portion of said inner side wall adjacent said bottom being long enough to wedge the bottom portion of said inner end wall outwardly toward said outer end wall, and a tab and adapted to be inserted between said outer and inner end walls for locking said side and end walls in upright position, said tab having an aperture adapted said end walls when the tray is in normal folded position, whereby air may pass through the end of said tray;

bottom of said inner formed from a single blank, a

bottom and folded inwardly and hinged on said side flap to align with apertures in flsainst the bot- 6. In a tray formed from a single blank, a hot- 15 folded inwardly and downwardly along parallel creases to form an outer end wall, an inner end wall and a flat top, a side flap hinged to said bottom and folded inwardly and downwardly along a single crease to form an outer side wall and an inner side wall terminating adjacent said bottom, the portion of said inner side wall adjacent said bottom being long enough to wedge the bottom of said inner end wall outwardly toward said outer end wall, the end of said inner side wall being cut at an angle to accommodate said inner end wall in its wedged position, and a tab on one of said outer walls adapted to be inserted between adjacent outer and inner walls for locking said side and end walls in upright position.

7. In a tray formed from a single blank, a bottom, an end flap hinged to said bottom and folded inwardly and downwardly along parallel creases to form an outer end wall, an inner end wall and a flat top, the end of said flap contacting said bottom to stabilize said top, a side flap hinged to said bottom and folded inwardly and downwardly along a single crease to form an outer side wall and an inner side wall terminating adjacent said bottom, the portion of said inner side wall adjacent said bottom being long enough to wedge the bottom of said innerend wall outwardly toward said outer .end wall, the end of said inner side wall being cut at an angle to accommodate said inner end wall in its wedged position, and a tab formed as an extension of said side flap and bent inwardly at an anglethereto for enfoldment by said end flap, said tab having folds conforming to the folds of said end flap and providing a reinforcement for said inner and outer end walls and top, said tab being re- I strained against endwise withdrawal by the wedging action of said inner side walls.

8. In a tray formed from a single blank, a bottom, a pair of end flaps hinged to said bottom, and folded to provide a pair of end walls of double thickness, the fold at the top of each end wall constituting aspaeing member to create a substantial space between the inner and outer folds of each of said end walls, the inner fold of each end wall intermediate its ends terminating in a longitudinally extending edge in contact with said bottom and spaced fromthe outer fold of said end wall, a pair of side flaps hinged to said bottom and folded to provide a pair of side walls of double thickness, the inner portion of each of said side walls terminating adjacent said bottom and being of greater length than the normal distance between the inner portions of said

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2444497 *Sep 11, 1944Jul 6, 1948Morris Paper MillsHollow-walled carton structure
US2454573 *Aug 3, 1945Nov 23, 1948Scher JosephFolding box
US2573706 *Jun 21, 1946Nov 6, 1951Grant Jesse RShipping case
US2588455 *Jun 28, 1948Mar 11, 1952Wallace A AdamsFolding box
US2594628 *Jan 14, 1946Apr 29, 1952California Container CorpBox construction
US2640643 *Jul 9, 1948Jun 2, 1953Frankenstein William PCarton
US2675166 *Jul 9, 1952Apr 13, 1954Container CorpPaperboard container
US2722362 *May 25, 1951Nov 1, 1955David LevkoffBoxes or cartons
US2728449 *Dec 20, 1954Dec 27, 1955Spitzer Paper Box CompanyCompartmented cartons
US2828059 *Sep 16, 1953Mar 25, 1958Crown Zellerbach CorpCarrying tray
US2967608 *Aug 7, 1958Jan 10, 1961Chartmakers IncCarrying case and display device
US3082928 *Mar 17, 1961Mar 26, 1963Johnson & JohnsonFabricated device and method of fabrication
US3100595 *Feb 27, 1961Aug 13, 1963Continental Can CoCantaloupe containers
US3227355 *Aug 17, 1964Jan 4, 1966Diamond Int CorpHollow walled display tray
US4180200 *Nov 30, 1978Dec 25, 1979Container Corporation Of AmericaLockable tray
US4187976 *Aug 28, 1978Feb 12, 1980Champion International CorporationCollapsible container with reinforcing members
US4265391 *Aug 30, 1979May 5, 1981The Mead CorporationNestable box and box blank
US5501395 *Sep 7, 1994Mar 26, 1996Kiwi Packaging LimitedStackable box with reinforced walls
US5516034 *Mar 9, 1995May 14, 1996Jefferson Smurfit CorporationProduce tray
US5704193 *Oct 12, 1995Jan 6, 1998Roe; Quentin J.Container for shipping and displaying articles, and method for making
US6296178Aug 9, 2000Oct 2, 2001Weyerhaeuser CompanyContainer with triangular corner posts
US6641032 *May 8, 2002Nov 4, 2003Fruit Growers Supply CompanyStackable container with reinforced corner
US8220633 *Dec 5, 2008Jul 17, 2012Georgia-Pacific Corrugated LlcStacking carton using a one-piece blank
DE1097351B *Mar 13, 1958Jan 12, 1961Erko Oldenburger KartonagenfabTransportbehaelter aus einem einzigen Zuschnitt von Pappe, vorzugsweise Wellpappe, insbesondere fuer Obst, Gemuese, Kartoffeln u. dgl.
WO2002074637A1 *Mar 15, 2002Sep 26, 2002Corrugated Synergies InternatiContainer with longitudinal passageways for additional ventilation
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/164, 229/170, 229/167, 229/919, 229/916, 229/180, 229/120
International ClassificationB65D5/00, B65D5/42, B65D5/20, B65D5/22
Cooperative ClassificationY10S229/916, Y10S229/919, B65D5/22, B65D5/0035, B65D5/2009, B65D5/4295
European ClassificationB65D5/22, B65D5/20A1, B65D5/00B2C1, B65D5/42V