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Publication numberUS2164542 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 4, 1939
Filing dateOct 25, 1937
Priority dateOct 25, 1937
Publication numberUS 2164542 A, US 2164542A, US-A-2164542, US2164542 A, US2164542A
InventorsOwens John A
Original AssigneeOwens John A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mechanism for accurately mixing dry ingredients
US 2164542 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 4, 1939. J, wE s 2,164,542

MECHANISM FOR ACCURATELY MIXING DRY INGREDIENTS Filed Oct. 25, 1937 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 29 I B l/\ I I'iij /2 O 45 "I 3:3

56 If r I a? '5 l INVENTOR.

JUHN A.[]wBN5 ATTORNEY.

July 4, 1939. J. A. OWENS 2,154,542

MECHANISM FOR ACCURATELY MIXING DRY INGREDIENTS Filed Oct. 25, 1937 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 1N VENT OR.

July 4, 1939. J, OWENS 2,164,542

MECHANISM FOR ACCURATELY MIXING DRY INGREDIENTS Filed Oct. 25. 1937 4 Sheets-Sheet I5 INVENT OR.

JUHN ADWBNB ATTORNEY.

y 4, 1939. J. A. OWENS 2,164,542

MECHANISM FOR ACCURATELY MIXING DRY INGREDIENTS Filed 001;. 25, 1937 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. JUHN AUwBNs ATTORNEY.

Patented July 4, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT arms MECHANISM FOR ACGURATELY MIXING DRY INGREDIENTS 7 Claims.

The principal object of my invention is to provide a mechanism for properly and accurately mixing, in pre-determined proportions, two or more dry ingredients; more specifically, the mixing, in the proper ratio, of powdered potassium iodide with calcium carbonate.

A further object of this invention is to provide a mechanism that accurately controls the rate of flow of an added ingredient to the main body of material and distributes the added material uniformly throughout the bulk of the finished mass.

A still further object of my invention is to provide a mechanism for accurately mixing dry ingredients in the proper ratio which prevents the lumping of the materials and which accurately compensates for the changes in volume of delivcry of the ingredients.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a mechanism for mixing dry potassium iodide with powdered calcium carbonate that automatically governs and controls the flow of patassium iodide relative to the weight of calcium carbonate passing through the mechanism.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a mechanism for the mixing of dry ingredients that is flexible in its control and simplifled in structure.

A still further object of my invention is to provide a mechanism for mixing dry powdered potassium iodide in the proper ratio with dry powdered calcium carbonate which pre-heats the potassium iodide, thereby relieving it of its moisture content and allowing for the more accurate dispensing of the potassium iodide to attain the desired ratio of mix with calcium carbonate.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a mechanism for mixing dry ingredients that is economical in manufacture, durable and efiicient in use.

These and other objects will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

My invention consists in the construction, arrangement and combination of the various parts of the device, whereby the objects contemplated are attained as hereinafter more fully set forth, pointed out in my claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. l is a front view of my complete mechanism ready for use.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged end sectional view of the potassium iodide hopper and agitating unit.

Fig. 3 is a side view of my complete mechanism and more fully illustrates Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged side sectional view of the intake conduit or mixing chamber of my device.

Fig, 5 is an enlarged front sectional view of the potassium iodide hopper and delivery mechanism, more fully illustrating itsv construction.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged front end sectional view of the rotary feed mechanism of my device. 5

Fig, '7 is an enlarged end sectional view of a portion of the mixing conduit or chamber of my device.

Fig. 8 is a top plan view of my complete mechanism.

It has been found that calcium carbonate is an essential element in the diets of various domestic animals and poultry. Also it is necessary to mix proportionate amounts of an iodide with the calcium carbonate to achieve more beneficial results. The proportion of iodide to calcium carbonate varies in difierent instances according to the needs of the particular animal or foul and the balance of its diet. It is necessary, as the iodide does not go into the compound with the calcium carbonate, that the mixing of the two ingredients be thorough and in exact predetermined ratio to eachother. Heretofore, it has been the common practice to convey calcium carbonate past an iodine or iodide sprayer where the iodine cornpound was sprayed in a liquid state onto the calcium carbonate just before the complete mixture was sacked. This has several disadvantages. It

is. diflicult to control this process, and furthermore does not evenly distribute the iodide content throughout the entire mass of the mixture. Obviously, the addition of the iodide to the calcium carbonate is merely guess work in this method. Also it has been necessary by these practices to merely mix the iodide with the carbonate at a constant flow of the iodide spray without regard to the speed of flow of the calcium carbonate. This former process furthermore made necessary the use of expensive machinery and was very inefficient inasmuch as the ratio of potassium iodide to calcium carbonate for certain specific conditions could not be positively and accurately controlled. I have overcome such disadvantages and objections as will be appreciated and as hereinafter more fully set forth.

Referring to the drawings, I have used the numeral ID to designate the frame of my device, having rigidly mounted thereon a hopper II. It is into this hopper II that pulverized calcium carbonate is introduced. I have used the numeral I2 to designate a spout having one end rotatably, secured to the lower portion of the hopper H and capable of rotation to any one of several points. The numeral l3 designates a sacking hopper supported by the frame l0 and over which the pipe I2 may be rotated when it is desired to obtain pure calcium carbonate as shown by dotted lines in Fig. 3. I have used the numeral l4 to designate an ordinary rotary screw type conveyor which is pivotly mounted above and supported by the frame l through the medium of shaft I5 and bearing elements l6 as shown in the drawings. Positioned at the rearward end of the conveyor G4 is a small receiving hopper l1 capable of receiving calcium carbonate from the hopper ll through the spout I2 when the spout is in position over the hopper [1. The numeral I8 designates an electric motor and driving mechanism for operating the rotary screw within the conveyor. I have used the numeral l9 to designate an adjustable counterbalance weight secured to the rotary conveyor mechanism for balancing the conveyor mechanism on the shaft 5. The numerals 20 designate two coil springs imposed between the screw conveyor mechanism and the frame 10 on each side of the pivot point or shaft l5. By this construction, a change in weight of calcium carbonate admitted to the conveyor 14 causes the complete conveyor assembly to yieldingly pivot about the shaft 15. The numeral 2! designates a link bar having one end pivotly secured to the conveyor mechanism [4 and its other end in operative engagement with an adjustable rheostat 22, which is shown in conventional form in the drawings. Thus as the conveyor assembly pivots on the shaft l5 the rheostat control arm is actuated by the link bar 2!. The numeral 23 designates the delivery nozzle of the rotary conveyor as shown in Fig. 7.

I have used the numeral 24 to designate a chamber or hopper secured to and supported by the frame l0 and having on its lower end portion an ordinary sacking nozzle 25 as shown in the drawings. The numeral 26 designates an intake conduit having one of its end portions extending into the upper portion of the hopper or chamber 24 a substantial distance and its other end extending downwardly and communicating with a mixing conduit or chamber 21 as shown in Fig. 1. The numeral 28 designates an air exhaust pipe in communication with the inside of the conduit 26 and having rotatably mounted therein a manually operated butterfly valve 29. The mixing conduit 21 is the chamber into which the calcium carbonate and potassium iodide are introduced through separate inlets.

The function and construction of this mixing chamber I will now describe. The numeral 30 designates a hopper formed on the conduit 21 and. capable of receiving the calcium carbonate from the conveyor I4 through the outlet nozzle 23. The numeral 31 designates a screen disposed within the conduit 21 at an angle, and upon which the calcium carbonate ejected from the nozzle 26 through the opening 30 must fall. I have used the numeral 32 to designate the potassium iodide intake pipe having one end in communication with the inside of the conduit 21 as shown in Fig. 4. The numeral 33 designates a second mesh screen secured within the conduit 21 and disposed at an angle beneath the intake 32 and upon which the potassium iodide must fall upon its entrance into the chamber or conduit 21. The numeral 34 designates rotary fan of the blower type having its air intake in communication with the conduit 21. The numeral 35 designates the pressure or outlet conduit of the blower fan which is in communication with one end of a pipe 36. The other end of the pipe 36 is returned to and in communication with the upper end of the chamber 24 as shown in Fig. 1. This provides a closed circuit, drawing air from the top of the hopper or chamber 24 through the conduit 26, the mixing chamber 21, where the fan picks up the calcium carbonate and potassium iodide injected into this chamber, mixes it within the fan by the natural breaking action of the fan and blowing the mixed product up into the chamber 24, where all excess air will go out through the conduit 26. It is, of course, necessary at times to exhaust the excess of air within the circuit as this air will accumulate and must be released. The amount of air to be exhausted can be controlled by the manual operation of the butterfly valve 29 within the pipe 28. I have used the numeral 31 to designate an electric motor for driving the blower fan 34. I have used the numeral 38 to indicate the po tassium iodide hopper of my device, having therein an agitator 39 as shown in Fig. 2 and Fig. 5. This agitator is driven by an ordinary electric motor 43. The numeral 4! designates an electric reflector heater positioned in the upper end portion of the hopper 38 and connected to a suitable source of electrical energy. The numeral 42 designates a small screw conveyor having its receiving end opening into the lower portion of the hopper 38 and its discharge end in communication with the upper end of the pipe 32 which has its lower end in communication with the mixing chamber 21 as herebefore described. The numeral 43 designates an ordinary electrical motor which is operatively connected through a belt or like to an ordinary adjustable transmission 44 having the ordinary shifting or gear changing lever 45. The other side of the transmission is operatively coupled to the rotary screw within the screw conveyor 42 in the usual manner. This motor 43 is connected to a suitable source of power and has imposed in one of its electrical lead lines the adjustable rheostat 22.

The practical operation of my device is as follows: Dry powdered calcium carbonate is introduced into the hopper II and dry powdered potassium iodide is introduced into the hopper 38 and the motors I8, 31, 40 and 43 or their equiva lent are placed in operation. This connects the heater element 4| reflecting heat upon the potassium iodide and drying it out. The transmission 44 is set at the desired speed by the handle member 45 in conformity to a predetermined ratio of speed relative to the mixing, by weight, of the dry materials.

The calcium carbonate will be emptied into the small hopper l1, will be conveyed by the rotary screw type conveyor I l, and will be discharged from the nozzle 23 into the opening 30. Simultaneously, the potassium iodide will be delivered from the hopper 38 through the screw conveyor 42 into the pipe 32 and thence into the mixing chamber 21. The calcium carbonate will fall on the mesh screen 3| and the potassium iodide will fall on the mesh screen. 33. These screens 3i and 33 prevent the heavier portions of the ingredients from lumping or caking on the bottom of the chamber 21 and will break up any tendency for delivering lumpy material into the fan 34 and also scatters the dry powder so that it may be uniformly received by the fan 34. The suction through the conduit 26 will draw the potassium iodide and calcium carbonate into the blower fan 34, causing them to mix and to be blown through the outlet 35, the pipe 36 and thence into the chamber 24, where the mixed powders will settle toward the bottom of the chamber 24. The air that has been forced into the chamber 24 through the pipe 36 will complete the circuit by being drawn through the conduit 26 and back into the mixing chamber 21. The counterweight I9 is adjusted to balance the conveyor mechanism for the normal flow or weight of calcium carbonate in the conveyor l4. Occasionally an increased volume of calcium carbonate will be emptied into the screw conveyor I4 or due to lack of supply a lesser amount will be introduced into the screw conveyor 14. This causes an unequal balance between'the conveyor I 4 and the counterweight l9, causing the conveyor to pivot upwardly when lighter than desired and downwardly when weighted with too great a volume of calcium carbonate. This rocking action operates the adjustable rheostat through the link 2|, thereby increasing or decreasing the speed of the motor 43 and increasing or decreasing its speed, consequently varying the amount of the potassium iodide delivered through the screw conveyor 42. This makes a very accurate control of the ratio of mix possible. The agitator 39 operating within the hopper 38 continually agitates the potassium iodide, thereby insuring a uniform flow or feed of potassium iodide into the conveyor 42. Furthermore, this agitation causes a stirring and breaking up of the potassium iodide and continual exposure of the powdered potassium iodide to the heat from the reflecting heating element 4|.

The mixed ingredients, in this case a mixture of calcium carbonate and potassium iodide, may be drawn off through the sacking nozzle and packed or sacked in the usual manner. When it is desired to have pure calcium carbonate, the spout I2 is rotated to a position as shown by dotted lines in Fig. 3 over the hopper [3 from which may be extracted any amount of untreated calcium carbonate.

Thus it will be seen that I have provided a mechanism for the purpose of mixing dry ingredients in exact proportion to each other and in a dry state that is extremely accurate in its function. My mechanism is flexible and automatically compensates for variations in the flow of the material through the device, thereby accurately measuring the pre-determined proportions of the ingredients. My device can be used for the mixing of any dry powdered ingredients where it is necessary to have a controlled ratio of mix. Furthermore, my device provides for the continuous agitation of the lesser ingredient and the heating of this ingredient to assure a uniform amount of delivery of the lesser ingredient to be mixed with the greater ingredient and prevents the two ingredients mixed from lumping or clogging in the mixing chamber.

Thus I have fulfilled my objects and overcome the objections and disadvantages of mechanisms heretofore used by providing an accurate, controlled and uniform mixing mechanism of great utility and of simplified and elicient structure.

I claim:

1. In a device of the class described, a frame, a hopper secured to the upper portion of said frame, a spout on the lower end of said hopper and in communication therewith, a horizontal conveyer positioned below said spout, a receiving spout on the end of said conveyer normally opening under said spout, a mixing chamber below the outlet end of said conveyer capable of receiving the discharge of said conveyer, a second hopper, a dispensing conveyer having one end in communication with said second mentioned hopper and its other end in communication with said mixing chamber, a blower fan having its intake in communication with one end of said mixing chamber, a collecting chamber in communication with the outlet of said fan, a conduit having one end in communication with another end of said collecting chamber and its other end in communication with the other end of said mixing chamber, and a means for regulating the discharge from said dispensing conveyer into said mixing chamber relative to the discharge from said horizontal mixing chamber.

2. In a device of the class described, a frame, a hopper secured to the upper portion of said frame, a spout on the lower end of said hopper and in communication therewith, a horizontal conveyer positioned below said spout, a receiving spout on the end of said conveyer normally opening under said spout, a mixing chamber below the outlet end of said conveyer capable of receiving the discharge of said conveyer, a second hopper, a dispensing conveyer having one end in communication with said second mentioned hopper and its other end in communication with said mixing chamber, a blower fan having its intake in communication with one end of said mixing chamber, a diagonal disposed screen in said mixing chamber below the discharge end of said horizontal conveyer, a diagonal disposed screen in said mixing chamber below the discharge end of said dispensing conveyer, a collecting chamber in communication with the outlet of said fan, a conduit having one end in communication with another end of said collecting chamber and its other end in communication with the other end of said mixing chamber, and a means for regulating 'the discharge from said dispensing conveyer into said mixing chamber relative to the discharge from said horizontal mixing chamber.

3. In a device of the class described, a conveyer mechanism pivotally secured to said frame member, a means for introducing a powdered substance into one end of said conveyer, a dispensing nozzle on the other end of said conveyer, a hopper, a screw conveyer having one end in communication with the inside of said hopper, a mixing chamber positioned below said dispensing nozzle in said first mentioned conveyer, a hopper in the upper portion of said mixing chamber positioned below said dispensing nozzle, a pipe having one end in communication with one end of said mixing chamber and its other end in communication with said second mentioned screw conveyer, a fan having its intake in communication with one end of said mixing chamber, an outlet conduit having one end in communication with the outlet of said fan, a collecting chamber in communication with the other end of said conduit, a second conduit having one of its end portions extending into and in communication with the inside of said collecting chamber and its other end in communication with the other end of said mixing chamber, and. a means inter-related between said first and said second mentioned conveyer for controlling the discharge from said second mentioned conveyer relative to the discharge from said first mentioned conveyer.

4. In a device of the class described, a conveyer mechanism pivotally secured to said frame member, a means for introducing a powdered substance into one end of said conveyer, a dispensing nozzle on the other end of said conveyer, a hopper, a screw conveyer having one end in communication with the inside of said hopper, a mixing chamber positioned below said dispensing nozzle in said first mentioned conveyer, a hopper in the upper portion of said mixing chamber posi all) tioned below said dispensing nozzle, a pipe having one end in communication with one end of said mixing chamber and its other end in communication with said second mentioned screw conveyer, a fan having its intake in communication with one end of said mixing chamber, an outlet conduit having one end in communication with the outlet of said fan, a collecting chamber in communication with the other end of said conduit, a second conduit having one of its end portions extending into and in communication with the inside of said collecting chamber and its other end in communication with the other end of said mixing chamber, screw elements diagonally disposed in said mixing chamber below said dispensing nozzle of said first mentioned tank and below said pipe from said second mentioned conveyer respectively, and a means inter-related between said first and said second mentioned conveyer for controlling the discharge from said second mentioned conveyer relative to the discharge from said first mentioned conveyer.

5. In a device of the class described, a mixing chamber, a means for putting dry ingredients into said mixing chamber, a hopper, a dispensing conveyer having one end in communication with said hopper and its other end in communication with said mixing chamber, said hopper capable of receiving a second ingredient, a blower fan having its intake in communication with one end of said mixing chamber, a collecting chamber in communication with the outlet of said fan, and a conduit having one end in communication with said collecting chamber and its other in communication with the other end of said mixing chamber; said first and said second mentioned ingredients capable of being mixed in said mixing chamber and said fan and deposited in said collecting chamber.

6. In a device of the class described, a frame, a

hopper secured to the upper portion of said frame, a spout on the lower end of said hopper and in communication therewith, a horizontal conveyer positioned below said spout, a receiving spout on the end of said conveyer normally opening under said spout, a mixing chamber below the outlet end of said conveyer capable of receiving the discharge of said conveyer, a second hopper, a dispensing conveyer having one end in communication with said second mentioned hopper and its other end in communication with said mixing chamber, a blower fan having its intake in communication with one end of said mixing cham ber, a collecting chamber in communication with the outlet of said fan, a conduit having one end in communication with another end of said collecting chamber and its other end in communication with the other end of said mixing chamber, a means for regulating the discharge from said dispensing conveyer into said mixing chamber relative to the discharge from said horizontal mixing chamber, and an agitating means in said second mentioned hopper.

7. In a device of the class described, a mixing chamber, a means for placing dry ingredients into said mixing chamber, a hopper receptacle, a means for conveying ingredients from said hopper to said mixing chamber; said hopper capable of receiving a second ingredient, a mixing means having its intake in communication with one end of said mixing chamber, a collecting chamber in communication with the outlet of said mixing means, and a conduit having one end in communication with said collecting chamber and its other end in communication with the other end of said mixing chamber; said first and said second mentioned ingredients capable of being mixed in said mixing chamber and said mixing means and deposited in said collecting chamber.

JOHN A. OWENS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3410530 *Dec 26, 1967Nov 12, 1968Gilman Brothers CoDry solids continuous blending and conveying apparatus
US4850703 *Jun 24, 1987Jul 25, 1989Kabushiki Kaisha Matsui SeisakushoMethod of mixing pulverulent materials and device for practicing the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/102, 366/152.2, 366/160.3, 366/156.2, 366/141
International ClassificationB01F13/00, B01F13/10
Cooperative ClassificationB01F13/1002
European ClassificationB01F13/10A