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Publication numberUS2165068 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 4, 1939
Filing dateMay 2, 1936
Priority dateMay 2, 1936
Publication numberUS 2165068 A, US 2165068A, US-A-2165068, US2165068 A, US2165068A
InventorsProtzeller Harry W
Original AssigneeFairmont Railway Motors Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for cleaning ballast
US 2165068 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 4, 1939. H. w. PROTZELLER APPARATUS FOR CLEANING BALLAST Filed May 2, 1956 5 Sheets-Sheet l RN QM 0M km Jam; 42 WW WZZ/zess: 16.

July 4, 193 H. w. PROTZELLER APPARATUS FOR CLEANING BALLAST Filed May 2, 1956 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 y 4, 1939. H. w. PROTZELLER 2,165,068

APPARATUS FOR CLEANING BALLAST Filed May 2, 1956 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 (i/ Z gghl w July 4, 1939. H. w. PROTZELLER APPARATUS FOR CLEANING BALLAST Filed May 2, 1936 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 July 4, 1939. H. w. PROTZELLER APPARATUS FOR CLEANING BALLAST Filed May 2, 1956 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patented July 4, 1939 PATENT ori ce APPARATUS FOR CLEANING BALLAST Harry W. Protzeller, Fairmont, Minn., assignor to Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc., Fairmont, Minn., a corporation of Minnesota Application May 2, 1936, Serial No. 77,598

5 Claims. (Cl. 209-324) This invention relates to improvements in methods of and apparatus for cleaning ballast and it consists of the matters hereinafter described and more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

One of the objects of the present invention, is to provide a method of cleaning ballast material excavated from'track wherein the ballast material is given a vigorous rolling and tumbling action in its advancing movement over cleaning screens or grates to release and separate the lighter and finer particles of the fouling matter in said material from the heavier and larger pieces thereof.

Another object of the invention is to provide a method for this purpose wherein the advancing ballast material is agitated while on the cleaner screen and is caused to retrogress at least in part during its generally advancing movement so that the ballast as a whole is maintained on said screen for a longer period of time than would otherwise be the case and so that the material may be more thoroughly cleaned in a relatively short apparatus.

A further object of the invention is to provide a novel apparatus whereby the improved method may be carried out as a continuous operation as the apparatus moves along a railroad track.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an apparatus for cleaning ballast including an upwardly and rearwardly inclined sifting grate or screen and associated ballast advancing means, at least a portion of which screen coacts with the advancing means to impart a rolling or tumbling action to the ballast material as it passes over the screen and thereby to remove the fouling matter from the ballast.

Still a further object of the invention is to provide an apparatus for cleaning ballast including an upwardly and rearwardly inclined screen capable of being vibrated, as the ballast advances over the same, whereby the ballast material is tumbled and caused to rid itself of fouling matter which falls through the screen for disposal.

The above mentioned objects of the invention,

- as well as others, together with the advantages thereof will more fully appear as the specification proceeds.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a view in side elevation of the cleaner box of the improved apparatus, with parts broken away better to illustrate the structure of the box;

Fig. 2 is a vertical transverse sectional view through a part of the cleaner box as taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view on an enlarged scale, partly in side elevation and partly in longitudinal section of parts appearing in the midportion of Fig. 1 and which will be more fully referred to later; 7

Fig. 4 is a detail longitudinal vertical sectional view through a part of the cleaner box, illustrating a modified form of mounting for a part of the cleaner screen or grate;

Fig. 5 is a transverse vertical sectional view through the structure shown in Fig. 4 as taken on the line 5-5 of said Fig. 4;

Fig. 6' is a fragmentary view in side elevation of a part of the cleaner box showing a further modified form of mounting for a part of the cleaner screen or grate;

Fig. '7 is a transverse vertical sectional view through the structure shown in Fig. 6 as taken on the line 1-1 of said Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary view in side elevation of a part of the cleaner box showing still a further modified form of the cleaner screen or grate and mounting therefor, and

Fig. 9 is -a transverse vertical sectional view through the structure shown in Fig. 8 as taken on the line 99 of Fig. 8.

Referring now in detail to that embodiment of the drawings, illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 respectively, Ill indicates as a whole the cleaner box of the apparatus. Said cleaner box is carried at each side of a railroad vehicle (not shown herein) in a manner whereby the box may be raised out of its working position in a ballast shoulder or intertrack space of a railroad, and when in its raised position may be retracted inwardly into a non-working position upon the vehicle. When in the non-working position, trains on adjacent track may pass with ample clearance whether in working a section of track or being transported from one place of use to another.

The cleaner box includes a pair of laterally spaced vertically edgewise disposed inner and outer side plates H and [2 respectively.-' Said plates are held in spaced relation by means of suitable cross members and by a plurality of shafts as will later appear. Connecting the front bottom corners of said plates is a ballast breaking member l4. When the cleaner box is in working position in ballast [5, the breaking member works along the top or grade of the sub-ballast I6 and lifts the ballast upwardly to break the bond between and loosen up the pieces of rock or stone constituting the ballast.

Projecting forwardly from the front edge of each side plate is a gathering wing I! which operates to cut through the ballast vertically. Each wing is pivoted at its rear margin as at l8 to suitable corner brackets I9 on the outside of said front end of the associated side plate.

Between the side plates and beginning at a point spaced rearwardly of the breaking member I4, is an upwardly and rearwardly inclined screen or grate indicated as a whole at 2B. The front lower end portion of the screen comprises a plurality of foraminous plate-members 2! which are rigidly secured to the side plates H and i2 respectively. At the extreme front end of the front plate-like member 2! is a sub-ballast plow 22 which is so set as to operate about in the plane of the top of the sub-ballast Is as left by the breaking member I 4.

The upper rear end portion of the screen or plate comprises a plurality of foraminous platelike sections 23- 23a-23b and 230 respectively, each having an undulatory'or corrugated top surface 24 wherein the hills and valleys of the corrugations extend transversely of the plates. In this instance, these plates are not rigidly fixed to the side plates but are so mounted as to have a limited movement with respect to said side plates so as to be capable of vibrating in a vertical plane.

As shown herein, each plate 2323a and 23b is provided on its underside with front and rear end pairs of depending bosses 25. A bar 26 extends transverselyof the plates and passes not only through the bosses of each pair but also through and beyondsuitable openings provided,

therefor in the side plates H and I2 respectively. Each end of each bar 26 is pivotally engaged in the bifurcated lower end of a suspending link 21. This link is in the form of a bolt and extends upwardly to pass through an associated laterally extending bracket 28 carried by the associated plate H or I2. A helical expansion spring 29 surrounds that part of each link between its bracket 28 and a nut and washer 30 on the top end of said link.

The front lower end of the rear plate 230 is provided with a bar 26a similar to the bar 26 and said bar 26a extends transversely of the plate and passes thzough suitable openings provided therefor in said side plates I I and I2 respectively. Each end of this bar is pivotally'engaged in the bifurcated upper end of a supporting link 21a. This link is also-in the form of a bolt and extends down through a laterally extending bracket 28a on the associated side plates ll-|2. A helical spring 29a surrounds that part of each link between its bracket and bifurcated end. This structure is substantially the reverse of the structure before described and this reversal is necessary to avoid a certain casing carried by one of the side plates as will later appear.

The upper rear end of the'rear plate 230 rests upon a roller 3| mounted upon a cross shaft 32 interposed between the side plates H and I2.

Also arranged in the cleaner box between the side plates thereof and above the grate or screen is an endless digger chain 33 of a width approximating that of the grate or screen. This chain is made up of lateral chain members including links trained about a plurality of idler sprockets 34 and a driving sprocket 35. The idler sprockets are mounted on cross shafts 36 and the driving sprockets which are disposed above and to the rear of the top end of the grate are mounted on a cross shaft 37. Extending between the side chain members of the endless chain are digger members in the form of flights or paddles 38 each of which include openings 39 as best appears in Figs. 2 and 3.

The various sprockets before mentioned are so arranged that the lower lap of the chain extends substantially parallel with the grate or screen 20, the adjacent portion of the chain, as it approaches said lower top extending in a downward and rearward direction. In operation, the

chain runs in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 1. The shaft 31 is driven by a sprocket and a chain 4| from the shaft 42 driven through suitable reduction gearing 43 from a motor 44 carried on the cleaner box toward the front end thereof.

' The chain M and associated sprockets are enclosed in a casing 45 and it is this casing which necessitates the reversed supporting mechanism before described, for the front end of the grate or screen plate 230. Y

The flights or paddles 38 are so constructed that their tip marginal edges will engage the undulatory top surfaces of the grate or screen plates 23-23a-23b and 230 respectively. As here shown, that portion-of the chain above the grate or screen plates 23-23(1 is held against upward movement as the flights pass over the corru gations of said plates by means such as follows:

Engaging with this part of the chain members of said chain from above, are rollers 46 arranged in transverse pairs. The rollers of each pair are mounted on transverse shaft 86a journalled in a pair of longitudinal side bars 41. These side bars have the bottom end of suspending links 48 pivoted thereto as at 49, the top ends of said links being pivoted on cross shafts 50-50 carried by the side plates II and I2.

The front end of the bars 41 are each pivotally connected to the piston rod 5| of a hydraulic cylinder 52 that is pivoted to the associated side plate II or l2 as at 53. When pressure fluid enters the rear ends of the cylinders, this retracts the piston rods 5| to exert a pull on the bars 41. By reason of the link suspension of said bars, they are swung forwardly and downwardly so that the rollers 48 operate as rolling shoulders which determine the position of the chain members of the chain with respect to the yieldably mounted grate plates 23 and 23a. Thus as the chain is driven, tip margins of the flights 38 on the lower lap thereof ride on or follow the undulatory surfaces of the plates. Due to the yielding mounting for said plates, the plates are caused to move up and down in planes parallel to their suspension links so that they receive a vibratory movement. It is apparent that by means of the cylinders 52, the hold down effect of the rollers may be controlled asdesired.

Beneath the greater rear end portion of the grate or screen mentioned and extending to the rear end of the side plates is located a dirt pickup mechanism indicated as a whole as at 60. This mechanism includes an imperforate plate 6| that extends at substantially the same angle of inclination as that of the grate or screen before mentioned. This plate engages at its lateral margins with the side plates so as to provide a bottom for the cleaner box at this point. The front bottom end ofthis plate is provided with a levelling or compacting lip 62 so arranged as to engage the top surface of, the sub-ballast IS. The rear end of said plate terminates short of the rear edge of the cleaner box to communicate with a lateral discharge chute 63.

Above thisplate or bottom is an endless chain 64 comprising a pair of side chain members and cross flights 65, the chain traveling in the direction of the arrows. The chain members are trained about front and rear end sprockets 66 and 61, the latter of which constitutes the driving sprockets for the chain. These driving sprockets are mounted on a cross shaft 68, carried in bearing blocks 69, that are longitudinally adv justable in suitable openings provided therefor in the side plates II and I2. Said blocks are capable of being adiusted in said openings by means of suitable screws 10 whereby the tension of said chains may be regulated. The shaft 38 may be driven in any suitable manner. If desired, a driving chain may be provided between the said shaft 68 and the shaft 31 before mentioned.

Along the inner surfaces of the side plates II and I2, above and substantially parallel with the plate BI, is a pair of angle bars which support a plate Ii upon which the flights for the top lap of the chain 64 ride. The flights of the bottom lap of the chain ride or engage edgewise upon the plate 6| so as to act as moving scrapers thereon.

When the cleaner box is in operation, the wings il-ll operate. to cut vertical slits in the ballast. It is to be noted from l5 down to the sub-ballast. Fig. 1 that when the flights or paddles on the chain 33 pass about the frontmost of the idler sprockets 34, they enter into the space between said wings and operate in conjunction with the forward movement of thecleaner box to move the ballast rearwardly upon the front end portion of the grate or screen 20. This carries the ballast upwardly and rearwardly over the front end portion 2| of the grate and then onto the first vibratory plate 23 and from thereon, onto the successive vibratory plates 23a-23b and 23c.

As the ballast moves upwardly over the fixed front end portion 2| of the grate, portions of the ballast pass rearwardly through the openings in the flights so that the ballast material has a rolling tumbling action imparted thereto. This causes a relative movement and engagement between the stone and the like constituting the ballast which tends to remove the dirt and the like therefrom. The dirt falls through the openings in said end of the grate to be deposited upon the sub-grade i6.

As the ballast material is successively moved by the flights onto the grate plate sections 23- 23c-23b and 23c, the engagement of the tips of the flights 38 with the undulatory surfaces of said plate sections cause them to vibrate. This vibration is imparted to the ballast material to cause a better relative movement and engagement between the larger pieces in the ballast, i. e., the

ballast proper so that the foul material which is adhered thereto, is dislodged. This action, together with the tumbling action caused by the ballast material passing backward, at least in part, through the openings in the flights, by reason of the piling up action of the material in the front of the flights, thoroughly cleans the" ballast material of the fouling matter which falls through the grate or screen and partly onto the sub-ballast in front of the lip 62 and partly onto the plate II. As the top lap of the chain 64 travels forwardly and downwardly on the plate ii, the flights 65 carry it down so as to be deposited on the front bottom end of the plate 6|. The flights 65 thus carries the fouling matter or dirt, up the plate 6i for discharge at its top rear end to the chute 63.

It is to be noted that by reason of .the openings in the flights, not only is the tumbling and rolling action imparted to the ballast but the ballast material remains on the grate for a longer period of time for the cleaning operation. It should be understood that this mechanism, while useable elsewhere, is particularly designed for operation as a part of a railroad ballast cleaner. In railroad practice there are space limitations results even on a relatively short screen because the material is held on the screen for a longer period. Naturally, the cost of producing such smaller mechanism is less, the weight of the parts is less and the entire machine design is aided by this feature.

As the cleaned ballast reaches and passes off the rear end plate 230, it dumps onto a chute (not shown) for a discharge from the cleaner box, as desired.

It is to be noted that the fouled ballast is advanced upwardly and rearwardly of the grate and that in this advancing movement, a tumbling or rolling action is imparted that causes a more vigorous relative movement between the ballast pieces. This insures the dislodgment of the fouling material from the larger particles 'or ballast proper and results in the thorough cleaning of the ballast material. Thus even though the ballast contains a high percentage of moisture which is held in place by the fouling matter, the cleaning action is still quite effective.

From the above, it is apparent that vibration is imparted to the plates 23-23a--23b and 23c by reason of the riding engagement of the tips of the flights over the undulatory surface of said pates and that this vibration may be said to be in a vertical plane or in a direction parallel with the edgewise planes of the side plates. If desired, this vibration may be a rotary one in a plane at a right angle to the edgewise-planes of the side plates.

In Figs. 6 and 7, I have shown a structure whereby such lateral rotary vibration may be imparted to said plates and such means is as follows:

The suspending bolt-like links 21. are provided at their bottom ends with eccentric straps 12 which operatively engage upon eccentrics i3 fixed to longitudinal shafts IL-14. These shafts, which have the same angle of inclination as the grate 20 as a whole, are journalled in brackets slightly less than that of the inside width of the' cleaner box. Thus when the shafts 14 are being driven, the plates 23 and 23a receive a lateral rotary reciprocatory vibration or movement of an extent equal the throw of the eccentrics 13 with respect to the shafts 14. In this movement of the plates, it is apparent that the suspending links rock laterally in their brackets 28. To accommodate this laterally rocking movement of said links, a hardened convex washer I9 is interposed between the associated springs 29 and the bracket 28.

When the shafts 14 are driven, it is apparent that the eccentrics 13 through the straps l2 and bars 26a impart a lateral, rotary reciprocatory vibration to the plates. As the tips of the flights or paddles pass over the undulatory surfaces of the plates they operate as before, and this in connection with the lateral rotary reciprocatory vibration of the plates, causes an intimate contact between the ballast pieces. Also, in the lateral vibration of the plates, the rolling and tumbling of the ballast pieces is increased for a better cleaning action thereof.

Should. it be desired to rely only upon the travelling engagement of the flight tips on the undulatory surfaces of the plates for the agitation of the ballast pieces so that the tumbling and rolling action: alone takes place, this result may be attained in the following structure:

Instead of yieldingly supporting the plates 23 to 230 inclusive, they may be made rigid with respect to the side plates H and i2. With such a structure, said plates are provided with lateral ears that are engaged against and are secured to the plates ii and i2 as by the bolts 8! as appear in Figsmi and 5. With'such a structure, the tips of the flights 38 will follow the undulatory surfaces of the plates and, of course, must rise and fall in accordance with the disposition of said surface. When the said plates are held against movement, the chain holding rollers 46 and associated elements are omitted.

In Figs. 8 and 9, I have illustrated another method of imparting vibratory movement to the plates and in this instance the movement is a longitudinally reciprocable vibratory one. In said figures 23.1: and 2311 indicate two only of the grate plates, each of which in this instance has a plane fiat top surface and the upper rear end of one plate overlaps the front bottom end of the other plate for a sliding supporting action thereon.

"The front bottom end of each plate has a supporting engagement on a transverse roller 82 supported on a shaft 83 secured at its ends'in the side plates H and i2 of the cleaner box. In the plane of the overlapping or'meeting ends of two of such plates is a reciprocatory member 84 standing perpendicular to the plane of said plates. Each member 84 has sliding bearing in bearing sleeves 85 provided on the outer surface of the asso-' ciated side plate H or l2.

About midway between the ends of each plate is a laterally extending stud 86 which passes out through suitable openings provided therefor in the side plates i i and I2 of the cleaner box. Pivotally connected to each stud is one end of a link 81., the other end of both links being pivotally connected to the reciprocatory member 84 at a point between the pairs of bearing sleeves therefor.

Extending transversely through the side plates H and I2 of the cleaner box, in the plane of the reciprocatory members 84 above the top ends thereof is a suitably drivenshaft 88. This shaft is journalled in boxes in ,the side plates and on each end thereof is an eccentric 89. Engaged on each eccentric is the top end strap of a connecting rod 9|, the bottom end of'which is pivotally connected to the top end of the associated reciprocatory member 84.

When the shaft 88 is being driven, the members 84 -are reciprocated in their bearing sleeves by reason of the eccentrics 89 and connecting rods previously mentioned. This motion is translated into a longitudinal opposed reciprocation of the two plates 23.2: and 2311 through the links 81.

Thus as the ballast material is advanced over said plates by means of the flights 38, the said material is thoroughly agitated and the rolling and tumbling action thereon is increased. This action in connection with the piling up and spilling of the ballast material, at least in part, through the openings 39, operates to thoroughly clean the ballast. It is apparent from the foregoing that the ballast material is maintained in vibration and is. caused to be retained for a longer period of time on the plates than has heretofore been possible. Thus thecleaning action on the ballast material is enhanced. Also, this is accomplished-with apparatus occupying less space than has heretofore been possible. The various advantages will read- 1 1. An apparatus for cleaning foul ballast which includes an upwardly inclined screen resiliently mounted, conveyor means for moving ballast upwardly along said screen including flights, means on the screen cooperating with means on the flights to effect vibration of the screen during movement of the conveyor means for the purpose of dislodging fouling material from the ballast.

2. An apparatus for cleaning foul ballast which includes an upwardly inclined screen resiliently mounted, a conveyor arranged above and traveling longitudinally with respect to the screen and carrying flights and means on said screen cooperating with means on said flights to effect vibration of said screen during movement of said conveyorv for the purpose of dislodging fouling material from the ballast.

3. An apparatus for cleaning foul ballast which includes an upwardly inclined screen resiliently mounted, a conveyor arranged above and traveling longitudinally with respect to said screen and carrying flights having openings therein through which ballast may move in a direction opposite that of the movement of the conveyor and means on said screen cooperating with means on the flights to effect vibration of the screen during movement of the conveyor for the purpose of dislodging fouling material from the ballast.

4. An apparatus for cleaning ballast which includes an upwardly inclined resiliently mounted screen having an undulating ,top surface, a conveyor having a portion arranged in operative relation above said screen and including flights adapted for moving engagement with parts of said surface for producing relative vibratory movement between said screen and conveyor, said flights having openings therethrough for the passage of ballast therethrough in a direction opposite that of the movement of said conveyor.

5. An apparatus for cleaning foul ballast which includes an upwardly inclined screen, a conveyor having aportion arranged in operative relation above said screen and including chains and flights between said chains and said screen, said flights having a continuous lower portion contacting the screen and laterally spaced openings above said portion, the flights being of such height as to prevent material discharging thereover and cooperating with the screen to prevent retrograde movement except at said laterally spaced openings in the flights, said apparatus in-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3411479 *Jun 16, 1966Nov 19, 1968Thomas K. HutchinsonApplicator including vibratory dispenser with charger
US3516530 *Dec 18, 1967Jun 23, 1970Clayson NvElevators for crops etc.
US4640364 *Sep 17, 1984Feb 3, 1987Franz Plasser Bahnbaumaschinen Industriegesellschaft M.B.H.Ballast cleaning machine with preliminary sifting conveyor
US5353959 *Dec 11, 1992Oct 11, 1994Recot, Inc.Apparatus for dispensing powdered or granular seasoning materials
US5554221 *Jun 21, 1994Sep 10, 1996Recot, Inc.Apparatus for dispensing portions of material
US5721000 *Jun 7, 1995Feb 24, 1998Recot, Inc.Method for producing seasoned food products
WO2014172798A1 *Oct 16, 2013Oct 30, 2014Basualto Lira GuillermoDrag conveyor and separation by size in a continuous mineral handling system
Classifications
U.S. Classification209/324, 198/734, 299/7, 209/397, 209/347, 209/365.2
International ClassificationE01B27/10, E01B27/00
Cooperative ClassificationE01B27/107
European ClassificationE01B27/10D