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Publication numberUS2166059 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 11, 1939
Filing dateOct 6, 1933
Priority dateOct 6, 1933
Publication numberUS 2166059 A, US 2166059A, US-A-2166059, US2166059 A, US2166059A
InventorsRalph L Kirk
Original AssigneeRailway & Industrial Eng Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lock for interlock systems
US 2166059 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 11, 1939. R. L. KIRK LOCK FOR INTERLOCK SYSTEMS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 6, 1935 Q54. gzaU INVENTOR Rafa/Z. 47/6 July 11, 1939. R L, RK 2,166,059

LOCK FOR INTERLOCK SYSTEMS III 1 Filed Oct. 6, 1933 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR July 11, 1939. R KlRK 2,166,059

LOCK FOR INTERLOCK SYSTEMS Filed OCL. 6, 1933 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 /f,Z INVENTOR fl x A, Air/F w wa 10k AIS, 47/9 /75 Patented July 11, 1939 UNITED STATES PATE'E' OFFIQE LOOK FOR INTERLOCK SYSTEMS trustee Application October 6,

16 Claims.

This invention relates to lock structures and particularly to lock structures suitable for use in interlocking systems for electrical and mechanical apparatus.

In providing locks for interlocking purposes between parts of machines; between separate independent machines; between electric apparatus connected to electric circuits, and the like, it may be necessary to provide various combinations of key-operable cylinder locks to establish the desired interlocking sequence for protection. In order to provide an economical and flexible system of manufacture and assembly, I employ standardized sections, preferably castings, which may be assembled into a rigid unitary casing to accommodate any desired number of cylinder locks for interlocking and operating keys. Each cylinder lock is provided with a cam arm for controlling or actuating a common bolt.

20 In order to protect the operating mechanism of the locks against weather, moisture, dirt, etc., the casings are constructed with a main chamber for the operating mechanism and with auxiliary chambers to accommodate the fastening 2 means, such as bolts, that may be used to secure the lock casing in position. The two chambers are separated by partitions to prevent moisture and dust from passing to the main chamber from the auxiliary chambers. When the sections are assembled to form the casing, the

adjoining surfaces and edges are covered with a suitable dust-proof and water-proof binder for protection, and the sections are securely fastened to each other to constitute a rigid unitary structure.

One object of this invention is to provide a lock assembly comprising a plurality of housing members and cylinder locks which may be assembled to constitute a rigid compact structure.

Another object of this invention is to provide a lock structure, of the character described, that may be formed by super-imposing appropriate sections or casing members to provide a structure for accommodating a desired number of key-operable cylinder locks to control a common bolt.

Another object of my invention is to provide a sectional lock structure, of the foregoing character, that shall be arranged to have a main chamber for the operating mechanism, and one or more auxiliary chambers or passages segregated or partitioned from the main chamber so that no moisture will be permitted to enter. the.

55v main chamber from the auxiliary chambers,

1933, Serial No. 692,457

through which fastening bolts may be extended to secure the lock in position.

Another object of this invention is to provide a lock structure in which an operating cam arm between the cylinder lock and the bolt may be 5 selectively positioned to permit the cylinder lock to be always located with its key slot in the same predetermined direction, irrespective of the direction in which the bolt of the lock is to be operated.

Another object of this invention is to provide a lock structure of the foregoing character, in which the cam arm may be selectively positioned to cause the bolt to be extended or to be withdrawn when the key is removed.

Another object of this invention is to provide a lock structure of the foregoing character, including a plurality of cylinder looks with means for providing substantial supports for each cylinder lock. 20

Another object of this invention is to provide a lock structure of the foregoing character, embodying a plurality of cylinder locks, one of which may be arranged to be the actuating cylinder lock for the bolt while the others function as releasing or pre-setting controlling locks.

Another object of this invention is to provide an individual weather-proof cover for each cylinder lock, to prevent entrance of moisture into each lock while permitting ready access of an operating key to its key barrel.

A further object is to arrange the switch to urge the lock bolt to each corresponding terminal position, after operation.

These and other objects will be referred to in the following specification together with the various features involved in the lock structure embodying the principles of my invention, which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a front elevational view of a lock assembly provided with three key-operable cylinders;

Figure 2 is a side View of a lock assembly, partially in elevation, and partially in section, with a part of the casing broken away to show the internal construction and assembly;

Figure 2A is a front schematic View of a cylinder lock, illustrating the key slot in vertical disposition;

Figure 2B is a side view of a tumbler with a part brokenv away to show the retaining groove for the key-pin, to prevent withdrawal of the key except in one position;

Figure 3 is a front phantom View showing the mechanical arrangement and relationship of the three key cylinder locks and the bolt;

Fig. 4 is a schematic view showing the outline of a single cylinder lock and Fig. 4A is a similar view showing the directional disposition of the associated cam arm element controlled by the key barrel to operate the belt in a vertical direction;

Figure 5 shows the lock of Figure 4 with the key barrel in vertical key-receiving position, and Fig. 5A shows the directional disposition of the cam arm for operating the bolt in horizontal direction;

Figure 6 shows the lock of Figure 4 with the key barrel still in vertical position, and Fig. 6A illustrates the directional disposition of the cam for operating the bolt vertically above the lock casing;

Figure 7 is a view of the lock of Figure 4 with the cylinder lock in vertical position and Fig. 7A shows cam arm arranged to acuate the bolt in horizontal position on the left-hand side of the casing;

Figure 8 is a front elevational view of a portion of a cylinder lock, with one type of actuating cam arm to be controlled thereby which is arranged to be secured to the key barrel by positioning bolts;

Figure 8A is a plan View of the cam arm shown in Figure 8 when the associated cylinder lock is used as an operating lock, such as the bottom lock in Figure 3; and in dotted line shows the outline .of a cam to be used with a releasing cylinder lock of the lock such as the middle or top cylinder lock of Figure 3;

Figure 9 is an elevational view of the lock and a sectional view of an operating cam arm of a diiierent type, which is provided with positioning pins whereby it may be secured to the key barrel;

Figure 9A is a plan view of the cam arm in Figure 9;

Figure 10 is a schematic view showing the arrangement and disposition of the lock cam arms and the bolt controlled thereby when the bolt is in raised or withdrawn position;

Figure 11 shows the cam arms and the bolt of Figure 10 when the bolt is in lowered or extended position;

Figure 12 shows a plan view of the top housing for the lock casing;

Figure 13 is a plan view of the inside of the top housing of Figure 12;

Figure 14 is a side elevational view of the housing of Figure 13;

Figure 15 is a front elevational view of the housing of Figure 13;

Figure 16 is a sectional view of the tower on the top of the housing of Figure 12 taken along the line iiS-l5 in Figure 15.

Figure 17 is a side elevational View of a middle or intermediate housing section for the lock;

Figure lS is a plan view of the housing section in Figure 17;

Figure 19 is a front elevational View of the housing section as shown in Figure 18;

Figure 20 is a plan view of the base or bottom housing for the lock;

Figure 21 is a front elevational view of the base or bottom housing;

Figure 22 is a side elevational view of the housing in Figure 20;

Figure 23 is a schematic front view of the locking bolt with one actuating lock and two releasing locks in bolt extended position;

Figures 23A, 23B and 23C are key hole symbols illustrating the position of the respective key barrels of Figure 23;

Figure 24 is a similar view with the releasing lock key barrels and cam arms operated to releasing position;

Figures 24A, 24B and 24C are key hole symbols illustrating the position of the respective key barrels of Figure 24;

Figure 25 is a similar View with all of the locks operated;

Figures 25A, 25B and 250 are key hole symbols illustrating the position of the respective key barrels of Figure 25;

Figure 26 is a side view of the bolt with the cam arms in the positions of Figure 25;

Figure 2'7 is a front elevational View of a cap for the key-receiving face of a lock;

Figure 28 is a front view of the cap when placed in position over a lock;

Figure 29 is a side sectional View of the cap on a lock head;

Figure 30 is a front elevational view of a lock structure provided with a biassing spring; and

Figure 31 is a side view, partially in section and partially in elevation, of the biassing spring assembly of Figure 30.

As shown in the drawings, a multi-key lock H, embodying the principles of my invention comprises a casing for supporting one or more cylinder locks to control a common lock bolt i.

The lock casing is made up of a base section 6, one or more intermediate sections l and top section 8 all of which are tightly secured together by two assembly bolts 9 and iii to constitute a rigid closed structure. Additional pressure to hold the casing sections tightly together is provided by two fastening bolts 8! and 82 which are employed to secure the entire lock assembly in position, where desired, as will be described later.

In order to prevent any moisture on the fastening bolts from entering the casing to affect the lock mechanism, each casing section is provided with a main chamber for the lock mechanism and separate partitioned chambers to accommodate the fastening bolts.

As shown in Figures 20, 21 and 22, the base section 6 is provided with a main chamber l5 and two auxiliary side chambers it and il separated from the main chamber by partition walls l8 and I9, respectively extending from the rear wall 2| to one of the side walls 22 and 23. Two openings 24 and 25 are provided through the base of the base section 6, in the auxiliary chambers l6 and I! for the fastening bolts 8i and 82 to be used to anchor the lock structure. In the main chamber l5, three openings are provided through the base. Two openings 26 and 21 are provided for the assembly bolts 9 and iii, and a third opening 28 is provided for the locking bolt 4. The shape of the opening 28 will depend upon the shape of the lower end of the locking bolt 4. In the drawings, I have shown the bolt as of square cross-section throughout its length. Where the locking end of the bolt is cylindrical, the opening 28 should be round.

In order to support a cylinder lock in proper position, the front wall (ii of the base section 6 is shaped to provide a semi-circular groove or bearing section 32. A similarly shaped bearing pedestal 33 is located in the main chamber l5 directly behind the wall bearing 32 and co-axially aligned with it. The pedestal bearing 33 is provided with a dowel pin hole M for receiving a dowel pin on the lock cylinder casing to anchor the lock against rotation. In order to hold the lock properly in position, it is engaged on top by similar bearings that are part of the superposed casing section, whether it is an intermediate section I or a top section 8.

The intermediate section I, as shown in Figures 17, 18 and 19, consists of a rectangular frame with its internal space subdivided, as in the lower base section, into a main chamber 35 and two auxiliary side chambers 36 and 31 separated from the main chamber by partition walls 38 and 39. The partition wall 38 extends from the rear wall 4| to the side wall 42, and the partition wall 39 extends from the rear wall M to the other side wall 43. The front wall 44 is shaped to provide two oppositely facing semi-circular grooves of bearing sections 45 and 46 in the upper and the lower edges, respectively, of the front wall. An internal wall or partition 41 extends between the two side walls 42 and 43, parallel to the front wall 44, and is shaped the same as the front wall to provide two oppositely facing bearing sections 5| and 52, directly behind, and axially aligned with, the similar bearing sections 45 and 46 in the front wall. The bearing sections 5| and 52 are each provided with a dowel pin hole 53 to anchor the associated lock cylinder casing in position.

The number of cylinder locks to be used in the lock determines the number of intermediate casing sections. Where three cylinder locks are used, as in the structure of Figure 1, two intermediate sections are used. Where only one lock is used no intermediate section is required, the top section being fitted directly over the base section.

The top section 8 is similar to the bottom section 6 in that it has a main chamber 55 with two auxiliary side chambers 56 and 51 separated therefrom by partition walls 58 and 59, respectively extending from the rear wall BI to one of the side walls 62 and 63. Two bosses 64 and 6-5 are provided with internally threaded openings for receiving the threaded ends of the assembly bolts 9 and II] for the structure. These openings are in alignment with the openings 26 and 2! in the base sections 6, when the sections are all assembled in proper positions. Two openings 66 and 6! through the top wall are provided for the fastening bolts Ill and B2 to be used to anchor the lock structure in position.

A bearing section 68 is provided in the front wall 69 and a pedestal bearing II is mounted behind it in the main chamber 55. The pedestal bearing is provided with a dowel pin hole I2. An opening I3 is provided for the locking bolt, and extends through the top wall of the top section 6. It is closed to the atmosphere, however, by a small square tower or cubicle I5 for receiving the upper end of the locking bolt 4. The front wall of the tower I5 is provided with an opening containing a transparent window II, to permit observation of the location of the lock bolt, and is hermetically sealed in place to exclude dirt and moisture.

In Figures 1 and 2, the several sections are shown assembled in superposed positions and held together by the assembly bolts 9 and I9, extending upward from the base section. The openings 26 and 27 for the assembly bolts are countersunk on the outside to permit the screw heads of the bolts 9 and W to be inserted to be flush with the bottom surface of the base section. When assembling the sections, the several adjoining edges of the walls and partitions, and the cylinder lock surfaces, are covered or painted with a suitable waterproof lacquer or cement which is then permitted to harden in position to form a hermetic seal with the parts assembled in position.

The View in Figure 2 shows the manner in which the locks are anchored against rotation by dowel pins 84 and 85, extending into the bearing sections and also into holes 86, in the sides of the locks. As shown in Figure 2A, dowel pin holes are provided on four sides of the lock cylinder casing. This permits the locks to beassembled always with the key slot in vertical position, irrespective of the direction of movement of the locking bolt, as illustrated in Figures 4 to 7, inelusive.

This principle of assembly applies to cylinder locks of any type, although I have illustrated a cylinder lock 89 of particular construction, known commercially as the four-way lock, in which the two intersecting slots in the key barrel are provided to receive a key 99 having an intersecting-rib section in the form of a cross. Each key 90 is provided with a guide and positioning pin M on the lower ri-b adjacent the key head. When the key is inserted into a key barrel, the pin 9I enters a gate 92 at the mouth of the key hole 92 of the cylinder casing, if the key is in proper position. When the key is rotated in the cylinder casing, the pin moves into an annular channel 93 Where it is held against movement tending to remove the key from the key barrel. The key is thus held against withdrawal until the key is turned back to its initial inserted position.

The cylinder lock illustrated herein is not part of my invention. When the key is inserted, it moves several pivoted blocking bars, or tumblers,

from blocking position, between the cylinder casing and an inner key barrel, to neutral position, at which the barrel is released and permitted to rotate freely in the cylinder casing. The barrel movement is imparted to an internal member, such as the locking bolt 4, by a cam arm secured to the barrel. The cam arm is disposed in a transverse slot in the locking bolt to translate the rotary motion of the key barrel into longitudinal motion of the locking bolt.

Where only one cylinder lock is used in the look, I prefer to have the cam arm set to operate from. dead-center to dead-center in its movement, as shown by the bottom cylinder lock I9! in Figure 3. Where more than one lock is used, however, I prefer to set only one look for such dead-center operation, to employ it as the actuating lock, and to employ the other locks merely as permitting or releasing locks to permit the bolt to be moved by the actuating lock. In such case the bottom lock IOI in Figure 3 is made to function as the actuating lock, and the other two locks I02 and I93 are made to function as the releasing locks. As shown in Figure 3, the cam arm. of lock I III is in dead-center position, but the cam arms of locks I02 and I03 are angularly offset so they may be moved by the mere movement of the actuating look, even though no turning force is applied to the keys of locks I92 and I113. .The insertion of the proper keys in the locks I92 and I93 releases them to permit their barrels to rotate when lock IIlI is used to operate the bolt.

The relative positions of the cam arms and the locking bolt in both terminal positions of the bolt, are indicated in Figures 10 and 11. The cam arm of the bottom cylinder look It! moves through a complete half-circle, but the other two cam arms move through an arc less than a half circle. 1

Because of the arrangement of the cam arms in Figure 3, cam arms of different length or throw are required for the looks that function differently. The releasing locks I02 and I03 require cam arms of greater length than the cam arm of the actuating look I III due to the positions occupied by the cam. arms in either terminal positions of the bolt, as shown in Figs. 3, 10, and 11.

The relative dimensions of the cam arms, for use with an operating lock or with a releasing tumbler, are illustrated in Figure 8A, the operating cam arm being shown in full lines and the releasing cam arm being shown in broken lines.

In order to provide the feature of adjustability for directional control of the locking bolt, as was previously discussed, I provide a cam arm I04 as in Figure 8 and Figure 8A or a cam arm I05 as in Figure 9 and Figure 9A, which may be located in one of four positions at right angles. The cam arm N34 has a center positioning pin I05 and is secured in position by four lateral screws. The cam. arm I05 is provided with four positioning pins and is held secured in position by a center screw.

The cam arms may thus be located on a key barrel to operate the bolt in any one predetermined direction while the cylinder lock is always disposed in the same direction, so that the key must be inserted always in the same vertical position, as is illustrated in Figures 4 to '7, inclusive.

As shown in Figure 4, when the bolt is to be reciprocated in a vertical path below the lock casing, the cam arm is mounted on the key barrel in the position indicated. The cylinder lock in this case is so disposed in the casing that the operating key must be inserted in a predetermined vertical position.

In Figure 5 where the bolt is to be operated to the right-hand side of the casing or horizontally, the cam arm is secured to the key barrel in the direction illustrated, while the lock itself is still disposed with its key slot in such position as to require the key to be inserted in the same vertical plane as required in Figure 4.

Figures 6 and '7 illustrate the respective arrangements of the cam arms to operate the bolts in the directions shown, while maintaining the locks in the same vertical positions as in the arrangements shown in Figures 4 and 5.

Although the arrangements in Figures 4 to 7, inclusive, illustrate only one key-operable lock for controlling the movement of the respective locking bolts, it will be understood that the locks may be modified to include more cylinders, similar to the construction in Fig. 1.

In that case the cam arms for the additional key barrels will bear the same relationship to the one illustrated in Figures 4 to '7, inclusive, as the releasing cam arms in Figure 3 bear to the operating crank in Figure 3.

By means of such cam arms for the key barrels, the locks may also be assembled so that the bolt will be extended or withdrawn when the key is removed. The lock may thus be made to function as an extended-bolt type or as a withdrawnbolt type. For an extended-bolt type, the cam arm is secured to the key barrel in the position it will occupy on the bolt when the bolt is extended. For the withdrawn-bolt type, the cam arm is secured to the key barrel in the position it will occupy on the bolt when the bolt is withdrawn.

The locks are thus convertible to either extended-bolt or withdrawn-bolt type, by merely securing the crank-pins to the key barrels in proper positions.

In Figures 23 to 26, inclusive, I have illustrated the construction and arrangement of another modification of an operating bolt controlled by three cylinder looks. The arrangement as shown in Figure 23 shows the location of the cam arms of the three locks I22, I2I and I22 when the locking bolt I 23 is moved to its full extended position, and the cam arms are in looking position due to the absence of the keys from the key barrels. In this case the position of the key barrels is illustrated schematically by the key-hole symbols I24, I25 and I26 at the side of the respective locks.

In order to provide a construction whereby the presetting or releasing function of the locks I20, I2I and I22 may be readily established to permit the operating lock to actuate the bolt, the bolt I23 is provided with a transverse slot I28 for the cam arm of lock I20 and two transverse slots I29 and I30 for the cam arms of the releasing locks I2I and I22. In addition, a longitudinal section along the edge of the bolt is reserved to provide a side passage I3I for the cam arms of the releasing locks I2I and I22, under certain conditions to be described.

Where the bolt is to be operated by being moved to its withdrawn position, as shown in Figures 25 and 26, the proper keys are inserted into locks I20, I2! and I22, and the key barrels of the releasing locks I2I and I22 are respectively rotated 96 to move the cam arms out of their respective slots I29 and I 30 into the side passage I3I, so that the portions I33 and I34 of the bolt can be moved vertically past the cam arms I 35 and I36 of the locks I2I and I22, respectively.

After the cam arms I35 and I36 of the two locks I 2! and I22 are rotated to the positions indicated in Figure 24, the operating lock I26 may be operated by its key to turn its cam arm I 38 through an angle of 180, as illustrated in Figure 25, as a result of which the bolt I23 is moved from its lowermost or extended position to its uppermost or withdrawn position.

In such position none of the keys can be removed. The operating key can not be removed from the lock I2il until the lock is rotated back to its initial position, due to the pin 9| on the key. The keys in looks I2I and I22 can not be removed while the bolt is in its upper position as in Figure 25, due to the fact that the portions I33 and I34 of the bolt I23 block the cam arms I35 and I36 in such manner as to prevent free rotation of the locks I2I and I22. The keys of the releasing locks are thus locked against removal, as Well as the operating key, while the locking bolt is in its upper or withdrawn position. When the bolt is returned to its initial lower or extended position, the keys may then be removed.

In many interlocking systems, it is desirable to provide a multi-cylinder lock structure in which one or more keys may be released for removal when the bolt is moved by the actuating lock key. The keys so released and removed may then be used to operate other locks sequentially arranged in the interlocking sequence.

To procure this feature of the lock, the convertibility feature of the cam arms on a lock is utilized, which permits a key to be removed from its lock in the extended or in the withdrawn position of the bolt, as may be desired in that particular case. In the other respective position of the bolt, the interlock key is held against removal from its cylinder lock. Thus each lock may be arranged to control its cam arm to release its key in a pre-selected position of the bolt, independently of the setting of other cylinder locks, and, further, in such manner that the cylinder lock key slot of each cylinder lock will always be in vertical position.

A multi-cylinder lock may thus have an actuating cylinder, a pro-setting or releasing cylinder for an interlock key from a lock prior in the interlocking sequence, and an interlock cylinder to release a key to serve as an actuating key or as a pre-setting key for another look sequentially arranged in the interlocking sequence, following the multi-cylinder lock from which the interlock key is released.

Where the multi-cylinder lock is provided with a bolt and cam arm assembly of the type shown in Figure 3, the top lock cylinder may be made an interlock cylinder by securing the cam arm to its key barrel in the position it would occupy when the bolt is raised, instead of being secured to the cylinder barrel in the position it occupies when the bolt is lowered. The key for the top lock could therefore be removed and re-inserted only in the raised position of the bolt, whereas the other two keys could be inserted and removed only when the bolt was lowered.

Where the multi-cylinder lock is provided with a bolt and cam arm assembly of the type shown in Figure 23, the crank-pin of the interlock cylinder is secured to its barrel in its horizontal position, corresponding to the raised position of the bolt. A suitable transverse slot should be provided in the bolt to permit the cam arm to be rotated into the transverse slot when the bolt is raised, so that the key may be removed from the look at that time. The bolt is then looked against operation until the key is restored and the lock moved to shift the cam arm out of the slot and out of the path of movement of the bolt.

In order to protect a cylinder lock against the admission and accumulation of dirt, moisture, snow and ice, where the locks are to be employed for out-door service, I provide a soft rubber cap I40 which in its normal position is of oval shape, as shown in Figure 2'7. The cap I48 is provided with a slot MI through which the operating key may be inserted into the cylinder lock without removal of the cap.

l/Vhen the cap MI! is placed in position upon the head I42 of the cylinder, the small diameter of the cap is stretched so that it will fit over the round head of the cylinder, as a result of which the cap assumes the round shape illustrated in Figure 8 and the normally open slot MI is closed by the tension upon the material on the two sides of the slot. By means of such cap, of oval shape in its normal position, with a slot through which a key may be readily inserted, while at the same time serving to maintain itself closed when the key is not in position, the locks may be effectively protected in out-door use against accumulation of dirt, moisture, snow and ice.

Figures 30 and 31 illustrate a form of the invention as employed with an electric switch I55 wherein spring means are employed for biassing the bolt to its extreme position in either direction following its operation by the lock member.

As shown in Figures 30 and 31, the switch comprises a set of lower stationary contacts I54 and I55, and a set of upper stationary contacts I 56 and 557, a set of intermediate pivoted contacts I55 and I59, two pivotally mounted bridging contact-jaws I6! and E52 and a pivoted assembly for controlling the movement of the bridging contact jaws IGI and H52.

The bridging jaws IM are mounted upon and secured to the lower end of a substantially rectangular insulating support I83 by rivets I65. The jaws I62 are mounted upon a similar support I64. The upper ends of the insulating supports I63 and HM are held in proper spaced relationshipby two pins I67 and IE8.

Both insulating supports I63 and I64 are similar in construction, the support I53 being shown in Figure 31. Snap-action operation of the pivoted assembly is effected by means of an overcenter spring I78. The upper end of which is secured to a pin I7! supported between two wall sections I72 and E73, and the other end of the spring is secured to a reciprocating lever I75 secured to the bolt IEI by a pin I76, so that movement of the bolt may be imparted to the lever I75 to shift the anchor point of the over-center spring I70 with respect to the pivotal center I77 about which the pivoted assembly oscillates.

The switch is mounted in a housing which is adapted to be secured to the other housings to make up a lock assembly as desired, whether with one cylinder as shown or with more. The switch housing is arranged to be secured to an intermediate section housing Iilii which serves as an adaptor housing to fit on a cylinder over which. the switch may be mounted.

The adaptor housing I99 is provided with a rectangular box wall I9I of the proper peripheral size and shape to fit over the lower section The front wall of the adaptor housing is provided with a curved section I93 and a saddle section I534 coaxially alined therewith, in a manner similar to that already explained for the other housing sections. In addition, the adaptor housing IBQ is provided with a top wall I95 extending across the entire top of the housing and some distance beyond each side of the housing to provide two flanges 595 and I97 to which the switch housing may be secured. The upper wall I95 of the adaptor housing I96 is provided with a square hole I98 for the lock bolt WI and two round holes I99 and 280 to accommodate two holding down bolts similar to bolts 8I and 82 in Figure 1. The lower surface of the top wall of the adaptor housing is provided with two bosses suitably located and suitably threaded, similar to threaded bosses 64 and 65 of Figure 13, to receive the assembly bolts.

Returning again to the bolt biassing and switch construction, it will be observed that a. relatively flexible connection is provided between the upper end of the lock bolt I5I and the operating bar I75 on the switch. This connection is established by a slot 21H in the operating bar fitting over a pin Z02 anchored in the locking bolt. A set screw 2H2 limits outward movement of the operating bar I75 which might break the mechanical connection between the bar I75 and the pin 292 in response to the lifting movement of the over-center spring I'Iil. The bar thus has sufficient lost motion to permit it to move somewhat in response to the lift force of the over-center spring I78 without imparting a binding force to the lock bolt I5I.

The conditions required of a proper interlocking system are that the interlocks function to positively lock, and prevent operation of, the protected or controlled equipment except under predetermined safety conditions, or according to a predetermined schedule or sequence of operation. I

In order that the locks may accomplish their protective functions, they should be normally indefeatible and tamper-proof, unless leaving a visual indication that the interlocking equipment has been operated to permit extraordinary access to other protected equipment. When such extraordinary access is desired, the interlocking equipment should be operable to permit easy and ready re-adjustment or removal, under proper authority, of course, to permit access to the controlled equipment, free of the interlocking devices.

When the lock is to be located as an element of the interlock system to prevent operation of a protected or controlled device, except under proper conditions, the lock will be placed in such position adjacent the element of the controlled equipment, and in such manner that the lock bolt, when extended, will prevent movement of that element, and, when withdrawn, will permit movement of that element. The lock is mounted in such manner that the assembly bolts 9 and ill will be unaccessible and therefore tamper-proof. The holding down bolts 8i and 82 of Figure I serve to anchor the lock in position. These bolts may, of course, be removed to remove the lock if necessary. However, in order to prevent such removal unless an indication is left, the holding down bolts are provided with a seal wire which must be removed before the bolts can be removed. Such procedure is resorted to, of course, only in an emergency, and by a person in authority. By such an arrangement the proper safety procedure may be assured under normal conditions, and yet such procedure may be dispensed with temporarily where emergency conditions require access to the protected equipment without following the control or procedure set up by the interlocking procedure.

Since in some locations of the lock, the lock bolt will normally be out of sight, a colored indicator button or painted spot 2 l5 may be provided on the front surface of the lock bolt, near the upper end. When the bolt is withdrawn such indicator button or spot will be visible through a transparent window 2% in the tower 15 on the top casing, as shown in Figure 1.

In the operation of the interlock system, where three keys are withdrawn from the other devices and employed to operate a three-key look, as in Figure l, I propose marking the keys as an aid to identify the cylinder lock with which the key is to be used. Thus, a key that is to be inserted in the bottom cylinder lock will have one notch or groove 2H8 cut into the head of the key. The key for the middle or second cylinder lock will have two notches, and the key for the top or third cylinder lock will have three notches for identification.

It will be observed that I have shown square openings in the top and bottom castings to guide the bolt. In addition to providing a two-point bearing support for the bolt, the use of at least one square guide bearing hole prevents rotation of the bolt during operation.

It will be obvious that my invention is not limited to the specific details of construction that are illustrated, since they may be variously modified without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention as set forth in the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. A look structure comprising a plurality of sectional housing elements superimposed to constitute a closed box structure, cylinder lock means supported on and between the housing elements to be accessible for operation, a bolt slidably supported by and between a wall of each end housing element, each wall serving as a bearing for the bolt and the bolt being provided with a transverse slot for each cylinder lock, and a cam arm associated with and controlled by each cylinder lock and having an element for controlling the bolt, said element of the cam arm being disposed in the associated slot.

2. A lock structure comprising a plurality of sectional housing elements superimposed to constitute a closed structure, cylinder lock means supported on and between the adjacent housing elements, said elements embodying co-operating cradle sections for providing a two-point bearing support for each cylinder lock means, and a bolt operable by the said means.

3. A lock comprising a plurality of housing elements each having a correspondingly shaped enclosing wall to permit the elements to be superimposed to constitute a closed structure, wall sections in each element to outline and confine a main working chamber and toseparate the main chamber from one or more auxiliary chambers, a plurality of cylinder locks, a bearing section in each main chamber and a corresponding axially aligned bearing section in one wall of each housing element, each pair of such bearing sections in one housing element co-operating with a corresponding pair of bearing sections in an adjacent housing element to position and support a cylinder look, a bolt operatively connected with the cylinder locks to be controlled thereby, and means for securing the housing elements together in fixed relation.

4. A look comprising a plurality of housing elements each having a correspondingly shaped enclosing wall to permit the elements to be superimposed to constitute a closed structure, wall sections in each element to define a main working chamber and to separate the main chamber from auxiliary chambers, cylinder lock means, a bearing section in each main chamber and a corresponding axially aligned bearing section in one wall of each housing element, each pair of such bearing sections in one housing element cooperating with a corresponding pair of bearing sections in an adjacent housing element to position and support a look, a bolt operatively connected with the locks to be controlled thereby, means for securing the housing elements together in fixed relation, and positioning means for the lock extending through the auxiliary chambers of the housing elements.

5. A look structure comprising a casing provided with a main compartment for the operating mechanism, an auxiliary compartment extending through the casing to accommodate securing means for the lock structure, and a partition between the main compartment and the auxiliary compartment to prevent moisture on the securing means from entering the main compartment.

6. A lock comprising a housing, a cylinder lock therein for receiving a key in a predetermined plane and direction, a bolt operable by the cylinder lock, and an adapter selectively disposable between the cylinder lock and the bolt to provide an operative connection between the cylinder lock and the bolt to operate the bolt in vertical or horizontal directions with the cylinder lock always disposed to receive its key in said predetermined plane and direction, irrespective of the direction of operation of the bolt.

7. A lock comprising a housing, a key-operable cylinder lock mounted thereon, a bolt operable by the cylinder lock, and an adapter between the cylinder lock and the bolt whereby predetermined operation of the cylinder look by its key may be caused to operate the bolt to extend it or to withdraw it in vertical or horizontal directions, according to the selected connection of the adapter, while the cylinder lock serves to retain the key against removal while the bolt is in any position other than a pre-selected position for which it is set.

8. A lock comprising a casing, a locking bolt movable to two terminal positions, a plurality of cylinder locks for controlling the operation of the bolt, an operating member controlled by one cylinder lock to actuate the bolt and to assume a dead-center position relative to the bolt at either terminal position of the bolt, and operating members controlled by the other cylinder locks and disposed off dead-center to permit the first-men tioned cylinder lock to operate the bolt when the other cylinder locks are unlocked.

9. A look comprising a casing, a plurality of key operated cylinder locks supported therein, a reciprocable bolt controlled thereby and provided with a control slot for each cylinder lock, a crank operable by each cylinder lock and embodying a crank pin in the associated slot in the bolt, one of said cylinder locks serving as the operating cylinder lock and the other serving to selectively permit operation when unlocked, the bolt being further provided with a side slot to permit the crank pins of the permitting cylinder locks to be moved out of blocking position, relative to the bolt, to position where the crank pins are then blocked by the bolt after it is moved, whereby rotation of the permitting locks to their initial positions is prevented until the bolt is restored to its initial position.

10. A lock for interlocking service, comprising a structure provided with a plurality of keyoperable cylinder locks and a common bolt, one cylinder lock being arranged to operate the bolt and the other cylinder locks being arranged to be preset to permit the operation of the bolt, said presetting being established by moving an operating cam of the lock out of the path of movement of the bolt, the cylinder locks and the bolt being related to prevent Withdrawal of the operating keys from the cylinder locks while the bolt is in operated position.

11. A look structure comprising a casing, a key operable cylinder lock mounted therein, a lockbolt to be controlled by the cylinder lock, and

a crank-pin to operate the lock-bolt and securable in various angular positions to the key barrel of the lock to cause the bolt to have an initial extended or initial withdrawn position.

12. A look mechanism comprising a plurality of key-operable cylinder locks and a lock-bolt common to all the locks and actuable to two terminal positions, means associated with one look for actuating the bolt to both terminal positions, and means controlled by the other locks to selectively prevent or permit the actuating lock to move the bolt.

13. A lock comprising a casing, a cylinder lock and a bolt operable thereby to two terminal positions, a crank-pin operable by the cylinder lock to actuate the bolt and movable to a dead-center position relative to the bolt at each terminal position of the bolt and means associated with the bolt for biassing the bolt to either terminal position after the lock has been operated to actuate the bolt toward such terminal position.

14. A look for interlocking service, comprising a structure provided with a plurality of keyoperable cylinder locks and a common bolt movable to a normal position and to an operated position only when all of the cylinder locks are l properly positioned by their respective keys, one cylinder lock being mechanically related to the bolt to actuate the bolt, and the other cylinder locks being arranged to selectively permit or prevent actuation of the bolt, and means whereby the other cylinder locks are selectively arranged to retain or to release their respective keys in one or the other terminal position of the lock-bolt.

15. A lock for use in an interlocking system comprising a casing consisting of a plurality of parts disposed and arranged in superposition to support cylinder lock means in position, said parts being arranged in alinement with each other and supporting a lock means between adjacent superposed parts, and with an operating bolt for the cylinder lock means, said bolt extending substantially through all of said parts, and assembly bolts for holding the parts together, the bolts being located in such position as to be inaccessible when the lock is placed in operating position for interlocking service.

16. A housing element for use in a multiple lock structure of the character described, said housing element embodying wall portions to serve as casing and as supporting elements for a completed lock structure, and embodying, further, additional integral partition portions to serve as supports for non-integral elements in co-operation with other like supporting portions of other housing elements to be assembled therewith, such assembly of housing elements to constitute a casing and structure for supporting and enclosing a cylinder lock and its associated mechanism.

RALPH L. KIRK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3154938 *Nov 17, 1961Nov 3, 1964Phelps Time Recording Lock CorLock for a sequential locking system
US3839886 *Aug 1, 1973Oct 8, 1974Watson GMultiple cylinder lock
US4114408 *Apr 4, 1977Sep 19, 1978Gee Victor LGate lock and latch
Classifications
U.S. Classification70/339
International ClassificationE05B35/08, E05B35/00
Cooperative ClassificationE05B35/08
European ClassificationE05B35/08