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Publication numberUS2166166 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 18, 1939
Filing dateMay 26, 1937
Priority dateMay 26, 1937
Publication numberUS 2166166 A, US 2166166A, US-A-2166166, US2166166 A, US2166166A
InventorsLarkin Walter
Original AssigneeFidelity Machine Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knitted fabric
US 2166166 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 18, '193,9. w, LARK| 2,166,166

KNITTED FABRIC Filed May 26, 1957 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 July 18, 1939. w LARK|N 2,166,166

KNITTED FABRIC Filed May 26, 1937 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 /azzer dimi@ Patented July 18, 19394 UNITED STATES KNITTED FABRIC Walter Larkin, Norristown, Pa., assignor to Fidelity Machine Company, Wilmington, Del., a corporation of Delaware Application May 26, 1937, Serial No. 144,952

7 Claims.

'I'his invention relates to knitted fabrics, and particularly fabrics capable of being made on a machine employing two sets of needles and provided with plating or needle-wrapping mecha- 5 nism for at least one of the needle sets.

One object of the present invention is to provide a knitted fabric having a design formed on at least one face thereof by plating or needle wrapping, with the wrap threads extending walel wise -of the fabric, at predetermined wales respectively, brought to at least one, face of the fabric, at predetermined courses, to form the design, with intervening portions of the wrap threads floating across intervening courses, and

.5 with the floating portions of the wrap threads buriedy in the fabric and concealed from view.

Another object of the invention is to make a fabric of two. separate main knitting threads knit together as a single thread, in single stitches,

:0 with or without wrap threads plated on predetermined stitches of predetermined wales and courses of such single stitches, and with floating portions of the wrap threads held between the two main knitting threads at those courses across which the wrap threads oat, to conceal the floats in the fabric.

Another object of the invention is to make a fabric `of two separate threads, as noted' above, and to knit the two threads'together as a single thread on both sets of needles in predetermined single ply parts 'of the fabric and separately on the two sets of needles respectively in other parts of the fabric as separate plies of a double fabric, with wrap threads plated on predetermined stitches of at least one ply of the double fabricv -and with portions of the wrap threads floating,"

across 'predetermined stitch courses and held between the two main knitting threads in the single p ly fabric and between the two plies of the double o ply fabric, to conceal said floats. y

Another object of the invention is to use two main knitting threads of different characters knit separately on opposite faces respectively of the fabric in predetermined areas of the'fabric and 5 together as'a single thread in other areas, whereby one face of the fabric, made by one of the main knitting threads, may be of a plain moisture-absorbing nature and the other face, made of the other of the main knitting threads, may be of an ornate nature decorated with designs formed by plating or needle wrapping threads face-knit at predetermined Wales and courses with intermediate floats buried in the fabric between the two main knitting threads. In the accompanying "drawings:

Fig. 1 is la diagrammatic View of a piece of,

single ply ribbed fabric made of two separate threads knit together in the dial and cylinder Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic view showing the two main knitting threads knit together in predetermined areas and separately in otherr areas with wrap thread floats between the two main knitting threads in predetermined portions of the fabric;

Fig. V3 'diagrammatically illustrates a tube knit according to the stitch diagram of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a transverse section of the tube taken on the line 4 4, Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 illustrates the tube of Figs. 3 and 4 made into a ljacket for a drinking glass or other object; and 1 Fig. 6 illustrates the construction of Fig. 1 applied to the top of a stocking.

In my prior United States Letters Patent No. 1,772,400, dated August 5, 1930, I Vdisclosed a ribbed fabric made of -a single main kiitting thread knit in both the cylinder and dial wales of a tubular fabric and having a wrap design formed on the cylinder wales, wherein floating portions of the wrap threads passed tothe inside of the .tube and floated loosely across the stitch courses in which .the wrap threads were not face- Aknit to produce a design on the outer face of the tubular fabric.

In the prior patent to Ralph I-Iinchlifl No. 2,035,384, dated March 24, 1936, he employed fabric made in accordance with my above noted earlier patent in his jackets for drinking glasses, etc. this case, the floating threads on the inside of the jacket fabric were visible through clear liquids and clear glass of drinking glasses,

etc. and detracted from the otherwise pleasing p appearance of the jacket. I f

Furthermore, when the fabric made according to my above noted prior patent was used as the tops for mensand childrens socks, etc.the loose floating threads presented a certain amount of annoyance when putting the stockings on.

'I'he fabric forming the basis of the present case avoids the above noted undesirable features, as the ,floating vportions of the wrap threads are buried and concealed in the body of the fabric and are not normally visible from either face of thefabric.

. As shown in Fig. 1, the fabric comprises dial or inside wales i, i alternating, in the present instance, With cylinder or outside wales 2, 2.

The fabric is composed of two separate main knitting threads a and b respectively which are knit together as single stitches 3 in the inside Wales i and single stitches 4 in the outside wales 2, said stitches 3 and 4 in each successively knit course being connected by portions 5a and 5b of the knitting threads a and b respectively, in intermediate wales t which connect the dial needle wales t to the cylinder needle wales 2 of a ribbed fabric made on a circular knitting machine.

Obviously, the fabric may be made flat on a double needle bank machine without departing from the spirit of the invention; and it will be understood that the terms dial or inner wales, and cylinder or outer wales are used as a matter of convenience for the purpose of description and are intended to cover equivalents in flatand circular knit fabrics.

Plating or wrap threads c extend walewise of the fabric and are knit on the outer face of predetermined stitches 4i of predetermined outside wales 2 in predetermined courses as indicated at c4 with intermediate portions c5 floating from one design spot to the next on a given outside Wale, along an adjacent intermediate or connecting Wale 5, as indicated at c5, between the connecting threads 5a and 5b, whereby said floating portions c5 of the wrap or design threads c are buried in the fabric between the opposite faces thereof and are hidden from view from either face.

'I'he fabric above described and shown in Fig. l is particularly adaptable for the tops of socks as shown in Fig. 6 wherein the top 6 is made of ribbed fabric like that shown in Fig. l and the leg 7, etc., are composed of plain fabric in the usual manner.

The fabric shown in Fig. 2 is composed, in part, of fabric .made in accordance with Fig. 1 and, in part, of a double ply fabric. The double ply section of the fabric is made on two sets of needles, the same as the rib fabric of Fig. 1, but when knitting the double ply sections of the fabric the main knitting threads a and b are knit together in relatively spaced outside wales only, and intermediate such spaced wales the two threads a--b are knit separately on the two sets of needles respectively. The knitting of the two threads a-b together in the relatively spaced outside Wales ties the two plies of the fabric together.

As shown inFig. 2, two relatively spaced sections I and II of the fabric are composed of rib fabric corresponding to the rib fabric of Fig. 1 and an intermediate section I2 is composed of two ply fabric wherein the main knitting thread a 'is knit solely on one set of needles, for example the dial needles of a circular knittingv machine, and the second main knitting thread b is knit solely on the second set of needles, for example the cylinder needles of a circular` knitting machine. The knitting of the threads a and b separatelyon the dial and cylinder needles respectively forms inner and outer plies I3 and I4 in the middle section I2 of the fabric.

At relatively spaced outside wales 2a extending longitudinally or walewise through the middle section I2, from the section Ill to the section II, the two main knitting threads a and b are knit together in single stitches 4a. This ties the inner and outer fabrics I3 and I4 together as a single fabric.

On predetermined outside wales 2b lying intermediate the tie wales 2a, 2a and on the tie wales 2a. also if desired, the Wrapped threads C are faQ@- arcaico knit on the main knitting thread b, as in the stitches ta and 4b, in predetermined courses along the wales 2a and 2b.

The floating portions c5 of the wrapped threads c lie between the main knitting thread b, knit in the outer ply M of the fabric, and the second main knitting thread a, knit in the inner ply i3 of the fabric, throughout the double ply section l2 and are hidden from view from opposite faces of the fabric. The fioating threads c5 extend through the rib sections Ill and il between .the connecting threads 5a and 5b, the same as in Fig. 1.

In Fig. 2 the sections it, ii and i2 may each include any desired number of courses and in the present instance the rib sections lil and Il l include `a plurality of welt courses l5, to give a finish to the opposite ends on each unitof fabric consisting of the sections iii, ii and l2.

When knit on a circular machine, the fabric is produced in a continuous tube consisting of a plurality of units each made up of a section it, a section i i and a section i2. The units, during the knitting of the tube, are joined together by any desired number of ravel courses i6 which may be cut to separate the units and raveled down to the terminal courses of the units.

When the unit shown in Fig. 2 is intended for use as a jacket for drinking glasses, etc., or any place where a certain amount of condensation forms on the outside surface of the glass or article, the main unit thread a is preferably composed'of material having relatively high absorbent qualities, 'such for example as loose spun cotton or loosely twisted cotton, while the main knitting thread b is composed of silk, rayon or other material presenting an esthetic effect to the outer surface of the jacket made from the unit of fabric shown in Fig. 2. Likewise the wrapped threads .c are preferably composed of silk or rayon.

When the fabric is used as a jacket for a receptacle or as a stocking top, it is preferable to incorporate elastic in the fabric, to cause the fabric to cling firmly to the article on which the jacket is disposed or to the limb of the wearer of the stocking provided with a top made in accordance with the present invention. It is, therefore, a part of the present invention to lay a rubber strand in each of any desired number of courses of ,stitches of which the jacket or stocking top is composed, the rubber strand preferably being laid in the center of the fabric between the inner and outer wales of the ribbed fabric and between .the inner and outer plies of the double fabric. In either case, the rubber strands are held by the connecting threads 5a and 5b which connect the outer wales to the next adjacentwales of the fabric. In this way the rubber strands, like the floating portions of the wrapped threads, are concealed from view from opposite faces of the fabric.

As shown in Fig. 5, the elastic strands 20 in the n section II of the fabric tube of Figs. 2 and 3 draw that end of the unit around the end of the article on which the jacket is applied, in the form of a flange 2I, While the elastic strands 20 in the section I0 at the opposite end of the fabric unit causes that end of the fabric unit to fit snugly against the sides of the jacketed article.

I'he elastic strands 20 may, if desired, be elimi nated from the section II and the unit may be closed about the end of the jacketed article by connecting opposite points of the inner edge of the circular flange 2|v by cross threads or by fabric, etc., placed across the end of the jacket and SGWn or otherwise secured to the flange 2 I.

I claim:

1. A knitted fabric comprising a pair of main knitting threads formed into stitch Wales and courses, and wrap threads face-knit on predetermined wales at predetermined courses with por# tions floating walewise across predetermined courses and buried in the fabric between said main knitting threads.

2. A knitted fabric comprising a pair of main knitting threads knit together in single stitches in adjacent wales and successive courses with parallel portions of said threads extending coursewise and connecting the stitches of said adjacent wales at said courses respectively, and Wrap threads face-knit on said single stitches on predetermined wales at predetermined courses with portions floating walewise across predetermined courses between said main knitting threads in said parallel portions thereof.

3. A knitted fabric comprising a pair of main knitting threads knit together in single stitches in successive courses and laterally spaced wales and separately in successive courses and adjacent wales intermediate said laterally spaced wales in separate plies respectively of said fabric,

- and Wrap threads face-knit on predetermined stitches in predetermined wales and courses with portions floating walewise across predetermined 'courses between said fabric plies.

Wales at predetermined courses with portions oating walewise across other predetermined courses between said main knitting threads and said fabric plies in said fabric Ysections respectively. 4

5. .A knitted fabric comprising a pair of main knitting threads knit together in single stitches in adjacent wales and successive courses in walewise spaced sections of the fabric and in laterally spaced wales of an intermediate section, and separately in successive courses and adjacent Wales in separate plies of said fabric in said intermediate section between said laterally spaced wales, Wrap threads face-knit onpredetermined wales at predetermined courses with portions floating walewise across other predetermined courses between said main knitting threads and said fabric plies in said fabric sections respectively, and elastic strands laid in predetermined courses between the opposite faces of the fabric.

6. An article of commerce in the form of. a jacket and composed of a tube of knitted fabric comprising a pair of main knitting threads knit together in single stitches in adjacent Wales and successive courses in walewise spaced sections of the fabric, and in laterally spaced wales of an intermediate section, and separately in successive together in single stitches in adjacent wales and successive courses in walewise spaced sections of the fabric and in laterally spaced wales of an intermediate section, and separately in successive courses and adjacent Wales in separate plies of' said fabric in said intermediate section between said laterally spaced Wales, wrap threads faceknit -on predetermined wales at predetermined courses with portions floating walewise across other predetermined courses between said main knitting threads and said fabric plies in said fabric sections respectively, and elastic strands laid in predetermined courses between the opposite faces of the fabric. l

. WALTER LAR/KIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3242754 *Sep 16, 1963Mar 29, 1966Safety Electrical Equipment CoTransmission
US3307379 *Nov 21, 1962Mar 7, 1967Whyte & Smith LtdMen's hose or half hose or other knitwear articles
US4229954 *Dec 7, 1978Oct 28, 1980Phillips Petroleum CompanyDouble knit fabric
US5373713 *Sep 20, 1993Dec 20, 1994J. E. Morgan Knitting Mills, Inc.Bi-ply fabric construction
US5735145 *May 20, 1996Apr 7, 1998Monarch Knitting Machinery CorporationWeft knit wicking fabric and method of making same
EP0132087A1 *Jul 5, 1984Jan 23, 1985James Joseph CurtisKnit cover for beverage container
WO1995008659A1 *Sep 8, 1994Mar 30, 1995J E Morgan Knitting Mills IncBi-ply fabric construction
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/170, 66/172.00E, 66/190, 66/201, 66/196
International ClassificationD04B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationD10B2403/023, D04B1/106, D04B9/32, D04B1/126
European ClassificationD04B1/10, D04B9/32