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Publication numberUS2168076 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 1, 1939
Filing dateFeb 16, 1938
Priority dateFeb 16, 1938
Publication numberUS 2168076 A, US 2168076A, US-A-2168076, US2168076 A, US2168076A
InventorsWalenta Paul
Original AssigneeWalenta Paul
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Upholstery staple
US 2168076 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

UPHOLSTERY STAPLE Filed Feb. 16, 1938 Fig.1.

INVENTOR. Paul Wa I Enta TTORNEYS.

Patented Aug. 1, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,168,076 UPHOLSTERY STAPLE Paul Walenta, Sturtevant, Wis. Application February 16, 1938, Serial No. 190,697

4 Claims.

This invention appertains to upholstery, and more particularly to-novel means for anchoring the spiral springs of the upholstery to the supporting webbing.

5 In the construction of upholstery, it is common practice to secure the springs to the webbing by thread or string, which is passed over the end coils of the springs and through the webbing. This is a laborious and time-consuming operation,

10 and the thread or string is subjected to wear, and in time the springs pull loose from the webbing. In some instances, it has been proposed to utilize metal clips to hold the springs in place. However, all of the clips with which I am familiar 15 have to be bent or clinched after the same are placed over the spring and through the webbing.

This also requires time, and care must be taken that the clips are properly bent. Otherwise, the

same will work their way through the webbing.

One of the primary objects of my invention is to provide a metal staple or pin which can be readily placed in engagement with the spring and through the webbing for securely anchoring the spring to the webbing without any bending or 25 clinching of the staple or pin after the same has been placed in position.

Another salient object of my invention is to provide an upholstery staple or pin which can be quickly and easily placed in position without 30 tearing the webbing, and which will not work its way out during use.

With these and other objects in View, the invention consists in the novel construction, arrangement, and formation of parts, as will 'be 35 hereinafter more specifically described, claimed, and illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which drawing:

Figure 1 is a plan view of a portion of webbing support for the spiral springs of an article 40 of furniture, illustrating the application of an embodiment of my invention thereto.

Figure 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary, detail plan view showing one of the staples or pins in position, the bottom convolution of the spring 45 being shown in dotted lines.

Figure 3 is a detail sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 1, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 4 is a detail perspective view of one of 50 .my novel staples.

Figure 5 is an enlarged, fragmentary plan view showing a slightly modified form of my invention and illustrating the same in its operative position for anchoring a spring to the webbing.

Figure 6 is a detail sectional'view taken on the line 6- -6 of Figure 5, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Referring to the drawing in detail, wherein similar reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several views, the letter S generally indicates my novel upholstery staple for securing a spiral spring I!) to its supporting webbing II.

The spiral spring I is of the common form used in upholstery, and the lower convolution thereof is fastened to the webbing by my staple S, which will now be described in detail.

Each of the staples S includes a pair of parallel legs l2 and I3. These parallel legs I2 and [3 are connected together at their inner ends by a U-shaped connecting or bridge piece M, which extends at right angles to the legs. The leg I3 is sharpened to provide a penetrating point IS. The leg l2 extends a material distance beyond the leg l3, and itsouter end is provided with an arcuately curved extension l6, which terminates in a penetrating point 11. The penetrating point l1 ends substantially in line with the penetrating point 15.

In use of the staple S, the spring I0 is placed on the webbing H and the penetrating point I! of the long leg I2 is inserted through the webbing, with the leg l3 straddling the wire of the lower spring convolution. The leg I2 is inserted in the webbing until the penetrating point I engages the fabric, at which time the point 15 is forced through the fabric a short distance, and the staple is swung down so that the connecting or bridge piece M will straddle the wire of the lower convolution, at which time the penetrating point I! is brought up through the fabric, and the staple is pushed forwardly until the connecting piece 14 engages the webbing. The curved end 16 will lie on top of the webbingand will ride under the lower convolution of the spring.

The staple or pin can be quickly and easily placed in position and will securely anchor the spring to the webbing. Backward movement of the staple or pin through the webbing is prevented by the curved extension IE on the long leg.

If desired, the long leg can have its outer end provided with a curved bill or hook l8, which can be sprung over the lower convolution of the spring. This will further aid in holding the spring in place and in preventing the staple or pin from working its way back through the webbing.

Changes in details may be made without departing from the spirit or the scope of my invention, but what I claim as new is:

1. An upholstery staple or pin formed from wire comprising a long leg, a short leg, and a U-shaped bridge piece connecting the rear ends of the legs together, both of said legs being provided with penetrating points, and said long leg having a curved extension on its forward end extending toward the longitudinal aXis of the short leg.

2. An upholstery staple or pin for anchoring coil springs to supporting webbing comprising a long leg, a short leg lying in parallel relation, a U-shaped bridge piece connecting the rear ends of the legs together, said bridge piece extending at right angles to said legs, the short leg being provided at its forward end with a penetrating point, and an arcuate extension on the forward end of the long leg curving inwardly toward the longitudinal axis of the short leg and terminating in a penetrating point.

3. An uphostery staple or pin for anchoring spiral springs to supporting webbing comprising a long leg, a short leg, a U-shaped bridge piece connecting the rear ends of the legs together,

said bridge piece extending at an angle to said legs, a penetrating point on the forward end of the short leg, and an arcuate extension on the forward end of the long leg, said extension having a spring-engaging hook terminating in a penetrating point.

4. In an upholstery construction including a textile support and a coil spring having its lower convolution seated on the upper face thereof, a pin for detachably connecting the spring to the textile support formed from wire having a pair of spaced parallel legs adapted to lie on opposite sides of the wire from which the spring is made, and a U-shaped bridge-piece connecting the rear ends of said legs extending over the wire of the spring, said bridge-piece being disposed at right angles to the legs, both of said legs being provided at their forward ends with penetrating points, and at least one of said legs extending through the textile support for engagement with the spring.

PAUL WALENTA.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4838254 *Aug 17, 1987Jun 13, 1989Georges GauthierSurgical fastening clip
EP0686364A1Jun 6, 1995Dec 13, 1995Frank G. CavazosMattress
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/360, 24/710.9, 5/235, 5/259.1, 5/263
International ClassificationA47C23/055
Cooperative ClassificationA47C23/055
European ClassificationA47C23/055