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Publication numberUS2168842 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 8, 1939
Filing dateFeb 17, 1937
Priority dateFeb 17, 1937
Publication numberUS 2168842 A, US 2168842A, US-A-2168842, US2168842 A, US2168842A
InventorsKesteven Charles E, Michaelson John W
Original AssigneeMiracle Massage Appliances Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Massaging device
US 2168842 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3, 1939- c. E. KESTEVEN ET AL 2,168,842

MASSAGING DEVICE Original Filed Feb; 17, 1937 2 Sheets-Sheet l Inventor-s- J W. Mmhaelson. C. E. Kes'keven Attorneys.

8, 1939 c. E. KESTEVEN ET AL 2,168,842

MASSAGING DEVICE 1 Original Filed Feb. 17, 1937 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I nve n'for-s:

QTW. Mxch'aelso '3' C-E. Kesteven B3 Md W fitter-megs.

Patented Aug. 8, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE MASSAGING DEVICE Application February 17, 1937, Serial No. 126,212 Renewed March 16, 1939 4 Claims. (Cl. 128-57) Our invention relates to massaging devices. A particular object of the invention is to provide a device of this nature in which instead of a vibrating or up and down action on the parts of 5 the body being massaged, there is an alternate lateral pulling and drawing action on these parts. We accomplish the objects of our invention by providing three juxtaposed resilient balls, there being two outer balls which rotate on axes which 10 are inclined with relation to the axis of rotation of a central ball. Another object is to provide in combination with the main portion of the massaging device, a support therefor whereby the device may be conveniently used for massaging of 16 the feet.

The novel features which we believe to be characteristic of our invention are set forth in the appended claims. The invention itself, however, both as to its organization and method of operation, together with additional objects and advantages thereof, will be best understood from the following description of a specific embodiment in which,

Fig. 1 is a top plan view showing the main por- 25 tion of the device held by a support.

Fig. 2 is a View in section on the line 22 of Fig. 2, and showing the device in operation.

Fig. 3 is a side elevational view of the main portion of the device.

30 Fig. 4 is a View mostly in central longitudinal section of the main portion, and showing it in operation.

Fig. 5 is a View in section on the line 5--5 of Fig. 3.

The main portion of the device includes three resilient balls l0, l2 and M, the body portions of which are preferably sponge-rubber. As best shown in Fig. 5, these balls are perforated diametrally and the perforations provided respeco tively with sleeves I6, 18 and 20. The sleeve 16 surrounds a tubular member 22 the inner end of which outside of the ball I is bent at an obtuse angle. The sleeve 20 surrounds a tubular member 24 the inner end of which outside of the ball 45 I4 is bent at an obtuse angle. The bent portions of the tubular members 22 and 24 extend into opposite ends of the sleeve I8 of the central ball l2, and butt together at about the center of this ball. Within the ball I2, the tubular members 0 22 and 24 fit over the respective end portions of a cylindrical member 26, one of the tubular members preferably being secured to the cylindrical member as by brazing while the other tubular member has a sliding fit over the cylindrical 55 member. This expedient enables the device to be conveniently and accurately assembled. In order to operate the resilient balls for massaging purposes, a handle is provided. This handle includes two arms 28 and 39 made of rod like material. These two arms at their rear are bent so as to merge into each other with adjacent portions lying close together, as will be understood from Fig. 1, to constitute rear portions which are substantially parallel with each other. Beyond these portions the arms are bent away from each other and formed into loops 32 and 34 and then are bent away from each other at a still greater angle and finally toward the front, are bent inwardly toward each other to form front portions 36 and 38 which however are separated from each other by a distance greater than the diameter of one of the resilient balls as best shown in Fig. 5. In assembling the device, the front portions 36 and 38 are respectively introduced into the outer portions of the tubular members 22 and 24. A bolt g0 40 preferably surrounded by a rubber sleeve 42 is then passed through the loops 32 and 34 so that upon turning down the nut on this bolt, the arms are held properly in place, it being understood that the arms are of a springy nature. The sleeves l6 and 29 respectively are provided on their outer ends with washers 44 and 4'6 which rest against the outer balls l9 and Hi. The arm portions 36 and 38 respectively are provided with rings 48 and 50 which rest against the outer ends of the sleeves l6 and 20. The rear portions of the arms 28 and 3d are provided with a hand engageable or handle member 52 which, as shown in Fig. 2 is made in two parts and held together by a bolt 54. The device as thus far described is adapted for massaging various parts of the body in a manner to be referred to later.

In order to adapt the device for massaging the feet, a support such as shown in Figs. 1 and 2 is provided. This support includes arms 56 and 58 which at their rear are joined together by an integral loop 65. About midway of their length, the arms 56 and 58 respectively are provided with loops 62 and 64 through which a bolt 88 preferably surrounded by a rubber sleeve 68 is passed. Near their forward ends, the arms 56 and 58 are connected by a cross rod 19 and then turned downwardly in order that they may be provided with rubber floor engaging members 72. The support at its rear is provided with a rubber floor engaging member 14.

The operation and advantages of our device will be understood in connection with the foregoing description and the accompanying drawings. It will be noted from Figs. 1 and 5 that We provide three resilient balls so arranged that there are two outer balls which are actively engaged with a central ball. Furthermore the two outer balls are rotatable on axes which are inclined to the axis of the central ball. In use, the handle member 52 is grasped in one hand and the device is moved back and forth longitudinally along the member of the body which is to be massaged, as for instance the arm A shown in Fig. 4. When the device is moved in one direction, the two outer balls exert a lateral pulling action on the flesh away from the central ball as will be understood from Fig. 5. When the device is moved in the other direction, the two outer balls exert a lateral drawing action toward the central ball. The main portion of the device is convenient for massaging most parts of the body of a person. However for massaging the feet, it is much more convenient to employ the support as shown in Figs. 1 and 2. For this purpose, the handle member 52 is slipped into the loop of the support, and the forward portions of the arms 28 and 30 are allowed to rest upon the member 68 of the support. It will be noted that the loops 32 and 34 engage the back of the member 68 of the support so that the massaging device is kept firmly in place. For using the device in this manner, the foot F is placed upon the three balls and moved back and forth, the same alternate lateral pulling and drawing action previously described being produced on the bottom of the foot. The floor engaging members 12 and 14 prevent the support from sliding as the foot is moved back and forth. When the device is used on portions of the body having hair, there is very little chance of the hair being pulled. This is due to the fact that when the device is in use, the resilient balls are squeezed together thus leaving no space into which the hair can enter as will be understood from Fig. 5.

Although we have shown and described a specific embodiment of our invention, we are fully aware that other embodiments are possible. Our invention, therefore, is not to be restricted except insofar as is necessitated by the prior art and by the spirit of the following claims.

We claim:

1. A massaging device comprising a hand engageable member, a pair of rod like arms extending divergently with relation to each other from the front of said hand engageable member and formed into loops, a bolt passing through said loops, said arms continuing divergently from said loops and then being turned inwardly toward each other, tubular members into which said inwardly turned portions fit respectively, the inner ends of said tubular members being bent at obtuse angles and abutting each other end to end, a cylindrical member secured in one of said inwardly turned portions and fitting into the other of said portions, a resilient ball mounted on said abutting portions for rotation thereon, and resilient balls mounted on the main portions of said tubular members respectively for rotation thereon, said last mentioned balls engaging opposite side portions of said first mentioned ball.

2. A massaging device comprising a handle, a central resilient ball, resilient balls positioned transversely on two opposite sides of said central ball and in contact therewith, axes of rotation for said balls carried by said handle, the axes of the side balls being inclined at obtuse angles with relation to the axis of the central ball, and a support adapted to rest upon the fioor having a loop in which the free end of said handle may be engaged and having a cross member for further supporting said handle whereby the device is positioned for massaging the feet.

3. A massaging device comprising a handle, a central resilient ball, resilient balls positioned transversely on two opposite sides of said central ball and in contact therewith, axes of rotation for said balls carried by said handle, the axes of the side balls being inclined at obtuse angles with relation to the axis of the central ball, and a support adapted to rest upon the floor including two divergent arms connected by a loop at the rear for receiving the free end of said handle, said arms toward their front portions being formed into loops connected by a bolt upon which intermediate portions of said handle may rest whereby the device is positioned for massaging the feet.

4. A massaging device comprising a support, rubber fioor engaging members secured to the underside of said support, a central resilient ball, resilient balls positioned transversely on two opposite sides of said central ball and in contact therewith, and axes of rotation for said balls mounted on said support, the axes of the side balls being inclined at obtuse angles with relation to the axis of the central ball whereby the device is adapted for massaging the feet.

CHARLES E. KESTEVEN. JOHN W. MICHAELSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2752915 *Jan 19, 1955Jul 3, 1956Riblet Clifford DFoot massager
US2903731 *Dec 19, 1956Sep 15, 1959Huhtala WilliamPipe brush
US2904813 *Jun 16, 1955Sep 22, 1959George R SchleicherPaint applying devices
US3204276 *Aug 16, 1963Sep 7, 1965Sr Walter L KennedyShielded paint rollers
US3279462 *Feb 4, 1964Oct 18, 1966Samuel NiquetRotative foot exerciser
US4554911 *Oct 13, 1983Nov 26, 1985Nielsen Margaret JMassaging tool and method for lower-eyelids and zygomatic skin
US4852553 *Mar 22, 1988Aug 1, 1989Voykin William JSelf-administering reflex massage therapy apparatus
US4989585 *Apr 3, 1989Feb 5, 1991Auker Lawrence FHand manipulated roller massage tool
US5382222 *Dec 9, 1992Jan 17, 1995Yih-Jong; ChangMassaging device
US5830161 *Oct 21, 1996Nov 3, 1998Cosmano; Robert J.Alternating ribbed foot massager
US6241693 *Apr 30, 1998Jun 5, 2001Brian D. LambdenMethod and apparatus for applying acupressure
US6409690 *Feb 14, 2001Jun 25, 2002Sherry ChenMassage device for feet
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/118, 482/79, 601/119
International ClassificationA61H15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61H2015/005, A61H15/0092, A61H15/00
European ClassificationA61H15/00, A61H15/00C